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17.5.12

Edgar Winter

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Edgar Winter - Not A Kid Anymore - 1994 - Intersound

Gone is the obsession with outer space themes, and back is the rock & roll/rhythm & blues that Edgar Winter does so well. Not a Kid Anymore reunites Winter with his old White Trash bandmate Jerry LaCroix, and the resulting mix of musicianship and vocal prowess make for an excellent album. Choice cuts include "Way Down South," "Big City Woman," and the remake of his solid-gold 1973 classic "Frankenstein." © Michael B. Smith © 2012 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/album/not-a-kid-anymore-r275978

This music should not be compared with Edgar's earlier White Trash days, where his music was mostly in the austere but brilliant electrified blues and hard rock vein. When Edgar relocated from New York City to Beverly Hills in 1989 to write movie score work, some critics openly resented his change in style, and albums like "Not A Kid Anymore" received a lot of undeserved criticism. This album contains "Way Down South" written for the "My Cousin Vinnie" movie, and a reworked version of the great "Frankenstein" hit which was used in the "Wayne's World 2" movie. This is hardly selling out to commercialism. They are both great tracks. "Not A Kid Anymore" certainly contains less of that "White Trash" hard rock element, but "Big City Woman" is a great blues rock tune as good as anything Edgar has ever done, and there are more tracks as good as that one on the album. "Not A Kid Anymore" is still a good rock & roll album with great musicianship, and an album you will listen to repeatedly. Edgar Winter is a true rock legend, and the present sad and sick old music industry could do with a good shot of this kind of music. Listen to Edgar's "The Real Deal" and "Live in Japan" albums, and his classic "Entrance" album. Buy his "Jazzin' the Blues" album. Did anyone hear that Scowell (the guy with the messiah syndrome) may be recruiting the one and only Ms. Spritney Beers as a judge on the X Factor. Well hallelujah and praise the Lord. Looks like great music has finally found a saviour [All tracks @ 320 Kbps: File size = 115 Mb]

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1 Way Down South - Edgar Winter 2:45
2 Not a Kid Anymore - Edgar Winter & Greg Sutton 4:33
3 Against the Law - Edgar Winter, Jerry Lacroix, Jack Pati 4:27
4 Brother's Keeper - Edgar Winter 4:57
5 I Wanta Rock - Edgar Winter & Steve Plunkett 4:31
6 Crazy - Edgar Winter, B. Parker, W. Waldman 4:51
7 Just Like You - Edgar Winter & John Duva 4:59
8 Big City Woman - Edgar Winter 4:26
9 Innocent Lust - Edgar Winter 5:09
10 Wild Man - Edgar Winter & Jake Hooker 5:20
11 Frankenstein - Edgar Winter 5:12

MUSICIANS

Edgar Winter - Guitar, Bass, Horn, Keyboard Programming, Alto Sax, Strings, Vocals
John Duva - Electric & Acoustic Guitar, Slide Guitar, Vocals
Bob Gianetti - Bass Guitar, Vocals
Bernie Pershey - Drum Programming
Jimmy Z. - Harmonica
Tony Bowman, Jerry Lacroix, Gary Pavlica - Vocals

SHORT BIO

Although he's often skirted the edges of blues music, at heart, saxophonist, keyboardist and composer Edgar Winter is a blues musician. Raised in Beaumont, TX, the younger brother of ukulele player and guitarist Johnny Winter, Edgar Winter has always pushed himself in new directions, synthesizing the rock, blues and jazz melodies he hears in his head. As a consequence, his fan base may not be what it could have been, had he made a conscious effort -- like his brother Johnny -- to stay in a blues-rock mold over the years. He's one musician who's never been afraid to venture into multiple musical arenas, often times, within the space of one album, as in his debut, Entrance (1970 Columbia Records). Edgar Winter, the second son of John and Edwina Winter, was born December 28, 1946 in Beaumont, TX, and much of the credit for Edgar and Johnny's early musical awareness must go to the brothers' parents, who have been a constant source of encouragement throughout their respective musical careers. The boys' father sang in a barbershop quartet, in their church choir, and played saxophone in a jazz group. Edgar and Johnny, who's three years older, began performing together as teens, playing local watering holes like Tom's Fish Camp before they were old enough to drink. The pair's early R&B and blues groups included Johnny and the Jammers, the Crystaliers and the Black Plague. In high school, Edgar became fascinated with the saxophone stylings of Julian "Cannonball" Adderley and Hank Crawford, and he began playing alto sax in earnest. As a pre-teen, he had played ukulele, like his older brother. But by the time he was of college age, Edgar had become competent on keyboards, bass, guitar and drums. Edgar was signed to Epic Records in 1970 after performing on his brother's Second Winter album. He recorded Entrance, his debut, which featured himself on most of the instruments. After radio success accompanying his brother on Johnny Winter And, he formed a large horn ensemble called White Trash. Although it was a short-lived group which broke up in mid-'72, Winter assembled another group to record two more albums for Epic Records, White Trash and Roadwork. Winter's single, "Keep Playing That Rock 'n' Roll," reached number 70 on the U.S. rock radio charts, and the album Roadwork hit number 23 on the album charts. By the summer of 1972, through constant touring, (and a ready willingness to do interviews, unlike his older brother), Winter formed the Edgar Winter Group in the summer of 1972. In January, 1973, Epic released They Only Come Out at Night, produced by guitarist Rick Derringer, which reached number three in the U.S. This album had Winter's most famous song, "Frankenstein," which reached number one in the U.S. in May of 1973. Later that year, "Free Ride" from the same album reached number 14. Although he's never matched that kind of commercial radio success again, Winter has continued to tour and record at a prolific pace. He relocated from New York City to Beverly Hills in 1989 to pursue movie score work, which he's had some success with, most notably with a slightly reworked version of "Frankenstein" for the movie Wayne's World II. Although his early-'70s albums like Entrance, White Trash, They Only Come Out at Night and Shock Treatment are bluesier affairs than some of his later albums, there are blues tunes like "Big City Woman" on one of his 1990s releases, Not a Kid Anymore (1994), on the Intersound label, and 1999's Winter Blues was almost wholly devoted to the idiom. A good introduction to Winter for those who weren't around in the early '70s is The Edgar Winter Collection (1993) on Rhino Records. © Richard Skelly © 2012 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/artist/edgar-winter-p73272/biography

MORE

By the time Edgar Winter left his hometown of Beaumont, Texas in the 1960's, he was already technically proficient in every aspect of music. A child prodigy who achieved international success early on, Edgar has found an audience in every major entertainment medium--music, film and television. A prolific writer, Edgar's music encompasses many different genres, including rock, jazz, blues, and pop. From his critically acclaimed 1970 debut release, Entrance, he has demonstrated his unique style and ability to cross the genre lines and do the unexpected. His early recording of "Tobacco Road" is a powerful, emotionally devastating masterpiece that propelled him into the national spotlight. Edgar followed Entrance with two hit albums backed by his group White Trash, a group originally comprised of musicians from Texas and Louisiana. White Trash enjoyed huge success, both with the 1971 release of the studio album, Edgar Winter's White Trash, and with 1972's follow-up live gold album, Roadwork. In late 1972 Edgar brought together Dan Hartman, Ronnie Montrose and Chuck Ruff to form The Edgar Winter Group, the legendary band that created such hits as the number one Frankenstein and the ever popular Free Ride. Released in 1973, They Only Come Out at Night peaked at the number 3 position on the Billboard Hot 200 and stayed on the charts for an impressive 80 weeks. It was certified gold in April 1973 and double platinum in November 1986. Edgar invented the keyboard body strap early in his career, an innovation that allows him the freedom to move around on stage during his multi-instrument high-energy performances. He was also the first artist to feature a synthesizer as the main instrument in a song. Frankenstein revolutionized rock and roll and opened up a whole new world of possibilities with experimentation and sound. After They Only Come Out At Night, Edgar released Shock Treatment, featuring guitarist Rick Derringer in place of Ronnie Montrose. Later albums included Jasmine Nightdreams, The Edgar Winter Group with Rick Derringer, a live album, Together Live With Johnny Winter, Recycled, a reunion with White Trash, Standing On Rock, Mission Earth, Live In Japan, Not A Kid Anymore, The Real Deal, and Winter Blues. With over 20 albums and numerous collaborative efforts to his credit, Edgar Winter has not been satisfied to ride the wave of popular music stardom. Major national television and radio campaigns have relied on Edgar's music to advertise their products. Edgar has also made frequent television appearances, both to promote his music, and to give his opinions on everything from Politically Incorrect to a commercial with George Hamilton for Miller Lite beer. He has appeared in the film "Netherworld", and the TV shows "The Cape", "Mysterious Ways", "Dave Letterman", and "Jimmy Kimmel". Edgar's music can be heard in no fewer than fifteen film and television projects, including Netherworld, Air America, My Cousin Vinny, Encino Man, Son In Law, What's Love Got to do With It, Wayne's World 2, Starkid, Wag the Dog, Knockabout Guys, Duets, Radio, The Simpsons, Queer as Folk, and Tupac Resurrection. Edgar's hauntingly beautiful song, Dying to Live, is featured as "Runnin” (Dying To Live) in the film "Tupac Resurrection", the biography on the life of rapper Tupac Shakur. Produced by Eminem, the song uses the vocal talents of the Notorious B.I.G., Tupac, and Edgar Winter himself. "Runnin" is on numerous Billboard charts. It peaked at number 5 on the Hot R&B/Hip Hop Singles Sales chart, and the soundtrack CD was number 1 for 8 consecutive weeks. Edgar's CD and DVD, titled, "Live At The Galaxy" was recorded live at the Galaxy Theatre for Classic Pictures in 2003. It features the songs, "Keep Playing That Rock and Roll", "Turn On Your Love Light", "Free Ride", "Texas", "Show Your Love", "New Orleans", "Frankenstein" and "Tobacco Road". In addition, the DVD includes a 30 Minute Documentary, "Edgar Winter: The Man and His Music". Edgar Winter's live shows consistently receive rave reviews. His music is always evolving and he is a master at stretching his skill and imagination to produce amazing results. He continues to thrill audiences with his live performances, always remaining on the cutting edge of music and style. Edgar is now at the very top of his game, and his future looks even brighter than his past. Edgar and his wife, Monique, live in Beverly Hills with their little dog Mimi. © 2001 Edgar Winter © http://www.edgarwinter.com/bio.php

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