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29.11.11

Danny Gatton



Danny Gatton - Funhouse - 2004 - Big Mo Records

Danny Gatton was truly the guitarist's guitarist. Hailed by Guitar Player as the "World's Greatest Unknown Guitar Player" he was cherished by the likes of Les Paul, Joe Perry, Steve Vai, Joe Pass, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Vince Gill, Albert Lee and countless other guitar luminaries. Until his tragic and untimely death in 1994 he was every guitar players best resource for a treasure of "hot licks". Never one to tour he remains an underground treasure for those "in the know". If you play the guitar, you owe it to yourself to check out this great instrumental genius. © http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/gatton07

The late Washington, D.C. born guitarist, Danny Gatton played rockabilly, R&B, pop, country, rock, and jazz equally well. This is a searing live set recorded at the Birchmere in Alexandria, VA. on June 10th and 11th, 1988. This is also the only official Danny Gatton release to feature the horn-driven jazz band, Funhouse who Danny played a regular weekly gig with in the Washington area. Danny described Funhouse as"the most stimulating musical experience I've ever had". The set also features legendary pedal steel guitarist Buddy Emmons. Listen to Danny's outstanding "Unfinished Business" and "88 Elmira St." albums. If you're unfamiliar with Danny Gatton's music, check out bigmo.com and look up Danny's catalogue. Danny was not only a great guitarist, but a truly brilliant musician. [All tracks @ 192 Kbps: File size = 79.7 Mb]

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

Blues on the Half Shell - C. Battistone
Momasita - Joe Henderson
Off the Top - Jimmie Smith
A Train - Billy Strayhorn
Land of Make Believe - Chuck Mangione
Smoke and Mirrors - C.Battistone
Pretty Blue - Danny Gatton
Red Label - Chris Battistone & Danny Gatton
Well You Needn't / Rock Candy - Thelonious Monk/Jack McDuff
Harlem Nocturne - Earle Hagen

N.B: Thanks,Danneau for the composers

MUSICIANS

Danny Gatton - Guitar
Billy Windsor - Guitar, Vocals
Buddy Emmons - Pedal Steel Guitar
John Previti - Upright Bass
Barry Hart - Drums
Bruce Swaim, Phil Berlin - Saxophone
Chris Battistone - Trumpet
John Jensen - Trombone

ABOUT DANNY GATTON

Guitar virtuoso Danny Gatton was known for the incredibly wide stylistic range of his playing; based in rockabilly, Gatton's musical vocabulary included R&B, pop, country, rock, and jazz, all of which he could play effectively. Gatton began playing at age nine, joining his first band, the Lancers, three years later. In 1960, Gatton pursued a jazz direction when he joined the Offbeats, where pianist/organist Dick Heintze proved to be one of Gatton's biggest influences. The band broke up four years later, and Gatton moved to Nashville to get into session work; there he met Roy Buchanan, who briefly became his roommate and taught him more about his instrument of choice. Eventually, Gatton built a reputation as a top-notch guitarist around his native Washington, D.C., area through his club performances. He recorded an album with his backing band the Fat Boys titled American Music in 1975 and followed it with Redneck Jazz in 1978. The band on the latter featured steel guitarist Buddy Emmons, drummer Dave Elliott, and eventual longtime cohorts Evan Johns on vocals and rhythm guitar and John Previti on bass. Gatton's albums led to offers from other musicians to join their bands. Lowell George extended an invitation after leaving Little Feat, but was found dead two days later. Gatton wound up touring with country singer Roger Miller and rockabilly artist Robert Gordon, giving him national exposure and a growing cult among guitar fans, who traded bootlegs of Gatton concerts. Gatton returned to Washington, D.C., to be near his friends and family while playing up and down the East Coast with several bands and doing session work. When Gatton purchased an old farmhouse in need of expensive renovations in 1988, he decided to pursue his music career more seriously. He released his first solo album since 1978 the next year, Unfinished Business, which drew notices from several guitar-oriented magazines as well as Rolling Stone. Elektra Records signed him during the summer, and he made his major-label debut in 1991 with the tremendously varied instrumental album 88 Elmira St. 1992 saw Gatton's first straight-ahead jazz album, New York Stories, recorded for none other than Blue Note. Gatton toured the nation solo for the first time in 1993 in support of Cruisin' Deuces, but its lack of success, coupled with the departure of A&R man Howard Thompson from Elektra, spelled the end of Gatton's association with the label. Gatton returned to session work to pay the bills, but sustained a further blow when rhythm guitarist Billy Windsor died of a heart attack early in 1994. Gatton collaborated with organ virtuoso Joey DeFrancesco on Relentless in May and toured Europe during the summer. Sadly, on October 4, 1994, Gatton locked himself in his garage and shot himself. He left behind no explanation. © Steve Huey © 2011 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/artist/danny-gatton-p4343/biography

BIO (WIKI)

Danny Gatton (September 4, 1945 – October 4, 1994) was an American guitarist who fused rockabilly, jazz, and country styles to create his own distinctive style of playing. A biography, Unfinished Business: The Life and Times of Danny Gatton by Ralph Heibutzki, was published in 2003. It has a voluminous discography. Gatton was ranked 63rd on Rolling Stone magazine's 100 Greatest Guitarists of all Time in 2003. On May 26, 2010, Gibson.com ranked Gatton as the 27th best guitarist of all time. Gatton was born in Washington, D.C. on September 4, 1945. His father, Daniel W. Gatton Sr., was a rhythm guitarist known for his unique percussive style, who left his musical career to raise his family in a more stable profession. The younger Gatton grew up to share his father's passion for the instrument. Danny Gatton began his career playing in bands while still a teenager. He began to attract wider interest in the 1970s while playing guitar and banjo for the group Liz Meyer & Friends. He made his name as a performer in the Washington, DC, area during the late 1970s and 1980s, both as a solo performer and with his Redneck Jazz Explosion, in which he would trade licks with virtuoso pedal steel player Buddy Emmons over a tight bass-drums rhythm which drew from blues, country, bebop and rockabilly influences. He also backed Robert Gordon and Roger Miller. He contributed a cover of "Apricot Brandy", a song by Elektra Records-supergroup Rhinoceros, to the 1990 compilation album Rubáiyát. Gatton's playing combined musical styles such as jazz, blues and rockabilly in an innovative fashion, and he was known by some as "the Telemaster" (a portmanteau of "Telecaster", Gatton's guitar of choice, and "Master"). He was also called "the world's greatest unknown guitarist". His most common nickname was "The Humbler", owing to his ability to "humble" or out-play anyone willing to go up against him in "head-cutting" jam sessions. It was Amos Garrett, guitar player for Maria Muldaur, who nicknamed Gatton "The Humbler". After a successful gig, Garrett would pull out a tape of Gatton and tell his band, "You think we played well tonight. Let's take a minute to listen to the Humble-lizer." A photo published in the October 2007 issue of Guitar Player magazine shows Gatton playing in front of a neon sign that says "Victims Wanted". However, he never achieved the commercial success that his talent arguably deserved. His album 88 Elmira Street was up for a 1990 Grammy Award for the song "Elmira Street Boogie" in the category Best Rock Instrumental Performance, but was beaten by Eric Johnson with "Cliffs of Dover". His skills were most appreciated by his peers such as Eric Clapton, Willie Nelson, Steve Earle, and his childhood idol Les Paul. During his career, Gatton appeared on stage with guitar heroes such as Alvin Lee and Jimmie Vaughan, the latter literally walking in one night on a Gatton club gig. There is also an apocryphal rumor about an on-stage "head-cutting" jam between Gatton and fellow Washington DC-area resident (and Telecaster player who also held the title of The Greatest Unknown Guitarist) Roy Buchanan. (Gatton had roomed with Buchanan in Nashville in the mid '60s and they became frequent "jamming partners", according to Guitar Player Magazine's October 2007 issue). He also performed with old teenage friend Jack Casady and Jorma Kaukonen (from Jefferson Airplane and Hot Tuna) as "Jack and the Degenerates". Those recordings were never commercially released, but live tapes are in circulation. In 1993, Gatton was invited by rocker Chris Isaak to record tracks for Isaak's San Francisco Days CD. Reports of where Gatton's playing can be heard on the CD vary, with unconfirmed reports placing him on either "Can't Do A Thing (To Stop Me)", "5:15" or "Beautiful Houses". Gatton reportedly brought a customized Fender Telecaster and Stratocaster to the recording session. He usually played a 1953 Fender Telecaster (Fender now manufactures a replica of his heavily customized instrument), with Joe Barden pick-ups and Fender Super 250L's, or Nickel Plated Steel (.010 to .046 with a .015 for the G) strings. For a slide, Gatton was known for using a beer bottle or mug (still half full of beer), without regard to whether it might spill all over stage or his guitar. During a 1991 performance on Austin City Limits, he followed this by wiping the guitar neck with a rag, then holding the rag between his fingers and the frets, all the while playing flawlessly. In the March 1989 issue of Guitar Player magazine, he said he preferred to use an Alka Seltzer bottle or long 6L6 vacuum tube as a slide, but that audiences liked the beer bottle. He did, however, only play slide overhand, citing his earlier training in steel guitar [Guitar Player, March 1989] He always played with a jazz-style teardrop pick, and was capable of intricate passages combining Bluegrass, bebop, and garage sounds, executed with amazing clarity and at dizzying speeds. His picking technique was a hybrid combination of pick and fingers, primarily his middle and ring fingers on his right hand. The basis of his picking technique was using banjo rolls; he was an accomplished banjo player and from that he learned the traditional (Scruggs style) right-hand technique. His forward roll consisted of a pick downstroke, then middle finger, then ring finger. His backward roll consisted of middle finger, then a pick upstroke, then a pick downstroke. He possessed a classical guitar left hand technique, thumb behind the neck, fretting with arched fingers. Also among his admirers are Les Paul, James Burton, Lenny Breau, Joe Bonamassa (whom Danny mentored when Joe was eleven years old), Vince Gill, Evan Johns (of "Evan Johns and His H-Bombs"), Chris Cheney, Bill Kirchen, Albert Lee, Steve Vai, Buckethead, Arlen Roth, Ricky Skaggs, Slash ("Guns N' Roses"), and Richie Sambora. On October 4, 1994, Gatton locked himself in his garage in Newburg, Maryland and shot himself. He left behind no explanation. In retrospect of his suicide, people around him have suggested that he may have gone in and out of depression for many years. On January 10, 11, and 12, 1995, Tramps club in New York organized a three-night Tribute to Danny Gatton featuring dozens of Gatton's musical admirers, the highlight of which was a twenty-minute performance by Les Paul, James Burton, and Albert Lee. Those shows (with all musicians performing for free) raised $25,000 for Gatton's widow and daughter.

28.11.11

Judie Tzuke



Judie Tzuke - BBC Live in Concert - 1995 - Windsong (USA)

Recorded live by the BBC at The Paris Theatre in Regent St, London on 10/10/81. "Excellent songs selected from her earliest work, this 1981 live recording gives the listener a good sample of her talent. Judy Tzuke is truly one of the most talented lyricists around. Some of her work will reach right down and give your emotions a wedgie, most noteably "Ladies Night" and "Understanding." Both tunes are exceptionally passionate, but if you're feeling the least bit lonely or dumped upon, these two songs might give you that last bump off the ledge. Yet all her work is not from the bottom of the heart, as many on this CD are recipes for smiles. As for the recording, keep in mind it's almost two decades old, and some of the concert goers were probably listening to 8-tracks to and from, but it is actually good to very good. The drums are front and center on the recording, voice neither overdone nor under. The only complaint I can register, and it's small, is that some of the audience appreciation is the loudest part of the track. Otherwise, anyone familiar with Judy will proudly add this to the collection. Just wish the record label would make more of her stuff available." (5 out of 5 stars) - from CD Review "Wish I was at the show" 04/08/1999 © 2006 - 2011 SwapaDVD.com. All Rights Reserved http://www.swapacd.com/Judie-Tzuke-BBC-Radio-1/cd/224170/

In 1979 Judie's beautiful "Stay with Me till Dawn" stayed in the UK charts for 16 weeks and is still played regularly on worldwide radio. In June 2002, the song was voted in at No. 39 in a BBC Radio 2 poll to decide the top fifty British songs of the past fifty years. The song has appeared on dozens of compilation albums and regularly appears in all time most popular song lists. Like so many other artists, it seems that the lady is remembered for one big hit. "BBC Live in Concert" contains plenty of other well structured, melodic songs, mostly composed by Judie with Mike Paxman. It is well worth checking Judie Tzuke's back catalogue. She is a beautiful vocalist, and a very underrated and great musician. She has covered folk, jazz, blues, and rock, but unfortunately her career has had more "downs" than "ups". Try and listen to her "Road Noise: The Official Bootleg" album, and check out her "Welcome To The Cruise" album @ JTZUK/W2TC [All tracks @ 320 Kbps: File size = 104 Mb]

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1. You Are The Phoenix - Paul Muggleton / Bob Noble
2. Sukarita - Mike Paxman / Judie Tzuke
3. Higher & Higher - Bob Noble / Mike Paxman / Judie Tzuke
4. Stay With Me Till Dawn - Mike Paxman / Judie Tzuke
5. The Flesh Is Weak - Bob Noble / Mike Paxman / Judie Tzuke
6. Southern Smiles - Mike Paxman / Judie Tzuke
7. Katiera Island - Mike Paxman / Judie Tzuke
8. Ladies Night - Mike Paxman / Judie Tzuke
9. City Of Swimming Pools - Mike Paxman / Judie Tzuke
10. China Town - Mike Paxman / Judie Tzuke
11. Black Furs - Mike Paxman / Judie Tzuke
12. Sports Car - Mike Paxman / Judie Tzuke
13. Understanding - Mike Paxman / Judie Tzuke

BAND

Judie Tzuke - Vocals
Mike Paxman - Guitar
Paul Muggleton - Guitar & Percussion
Rhino Edwards - Bass
Bob Noble - Keyboards
Charlie Morgan - Drums

BIO (WIKI)

Judie Tzuke (born Judie Myers, 3 April 1956 in London) is an English singer/songwriter. Her father, Sefton Myers, was a successful property developer who also managed artists and singers—most notably Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice during the writing of Jesus Christ Superstar. Her family relocated from Poland to England in the 1920s, and changed their surname from Tzuke to Myers. When Tzuke embarked on her singing career, she decided to reclaim the family's Polish name. Her mother, Jean Silverside, was a television actress. Tzuke has two children: Bailey, also a singer-songwriter, and Tallula Muggleton-Tzuke. Her partner Paul Muggleton has three children: Annie Moody Muggleton; Andy Muggleton and Jamie Muggleton. Educated in the visual arts, performing arts, and music, Tzuke performed in folk clubs from the age of 15. Her meeting with Mike Paxman in 1975 was a turning point and they began to collaborate. They eventually secured a recording contract and formed a band with Paul Muggleton. Under the name of "Tzuke and Paxo," the band released singles, beginning with "These are the Laws" (1975). Judie and Paul later had two children together, Bailey and Tallula. Tzuke's career proper began in 1977, when she signed to Elton John's label Rocket Records. Her first single on Rocket, "For You" (1978), was released under the name of Tzuke and Paxo. However, her first major success - the classic single "Stay with Me till Dawn", released in 1979 - was released simply under "Judie Tzuke". Judie's first album, Welcome to the Cruise, which featured "Stay with Me till Dawn" and some of the Tzuke and Paxo singles, achieved great critical and commercial success. In 2002, "Stay With Me till Dawn" was chosen by the British public as one of the fifty best British songs 1952-2002 (ranking number 39). The song was also sampled by Mylo in the song "Need You Tonite", which is taken from his 2004 album Destroy Rock & Roll. The singer's second album, Sportscar (1980), did not fare so well; possibly because Elton John decided to change his label's distribution company part-way through his American tour (on which Judie was support act), meaning that all support for the tour, and for Tzuke's records in the USA, was pulled. Tzuke released one more record on Rocket, I Am the Phoenix (1982), but then decided to leave for Chrysalis Records. In 1982 Tzuke joined a new label, Chrysalis Records, which promoted well in the UK music press her first album for them, Shoot The Moon. The album gained good reviews and spawned three singles, including a picture disc 7", with the album faring well in the UK charts. Tzuke completed a 57 date tour of the UK, culminating as the headline act at that year's Glastonbury Festival. The performance was recorded for a TV special on UK commercial broadcaster ITV. Several performances from the tour were recorded and released at the end of 1982 as a double album, Road Noise: The Official Bootleg. In summer 1983 Rocket Records issued The Best, an odd compilation album which left out two of her single releases. "Black Furs" was issued as a single using a different recording than that which featured on the album or previous issue I Am The Phoenix. September 1983 saw the release of the much anticipated Ritmo album (Italian for rhythm). The album was somewhat a departure from previous work with a much more electronic feel. The single "Jeanie No" preceded the album and was played heavily on radio, yet did not chart. An edit and extended remix of the track were issued on 7" and 12" (Tzuke's first). The subsequent single "How Do I Feel?" did not fare any better. Chrysalis did not release the album or singles outside of the UK. During autumn 1983 Tzuke toured, taking in larger (but fewer) venues. Tzuke believed that Chrysalis was not interested in promoting her material and decided to take control of her releases, opting for an independent company release of material over the next two years. "You" was released in October 1984; a cover of a lesser-known Marvin Gaye track, turning a rather sedate piece into a grinding electro production. Several different versions of the track were released on the 7" and 12" issues. In early 1985 "I'll Be The One" was issued as the second single, released with an impressive video to promote the track. The Cat Is Out album was released in spring 1985 charting at number 35. June 1985 saw the third single "Love Like Fire" released, again with several remixes on the 7" and 12" issues. September 1985 saw the final single "This Side of Heaven" issued at the same time as the tour. The Cat Is Out Tour proved to be Tzuke's most successful to date with capacity crowds at some of the UK's largest venues. The Fairfield Halls, Croydon date was recorded for a TV special, which many years later was issued as a CD/DVD release. "This Side of Heaven" began to be played by BBC Radio 1 DJ Gary Davis, who made it his record of the week in January 1985, helping Tzuke to reach number 100 in the UK charts. According to Record Mirror in their 1985 end of year review of artists and sales, by the end of 1985 Tzuke was the 5th best selling British female singer for the first half of the 1980s. After a quiet period following the birth of her daughter Bailey, in 1989 the Turning Stones album was released and "We'll Go Dreaming" became Tzuke's first top 75 hit for ten years. Turning Stones charted reasonably, but was quickly deleted by Polydor following a dispute over the 1989 tour, which was subsequently cancelled, enraging fans who turned up to venues. Tzuke later apologised to fans telling them that the cancellation of the tour was out of her control and not her fault, but at the time was gagged by her record company from saying anything publicly on the matter as mentioned by her when she appeared as a guest on Radio 1's Friday evening show "Round Table" reviewing that weeks releases. August 1990 saw another record company, Columbia Records (CBS), issuing a new single "God Only Knows" a cover version of the Beach Boys classic. Despite the single issued in myriad versions (7", 7" poster wrap, limited edition numbered 10", 12" and CD single) plus a video, the song failed to gain chart success, but the video did get viewings on ITV's Breakfast Show. A limited promo 12" was issued of a remix made by DJ Judge Jewels. The song also featured in an ITV documentary series about recording techniques, where Judie and producers Mike Paxman and Paul Muggleton showed hoe the song had been constructed using sound bytes of her voice which were transposed into a synthesizer range. The next album Left Hand Talking was released in May 1991. March 1991 saw a 3 track promo issued widely in independent record stores, and April 1991 two performances at London's Shaw Theatre.These performances were the first time neither Muggleton, Paxman or Noble were part of her live band. "Outlaws" was released in June 1991, on the Columbia label and readily available in independent retailers, but made no impact upon the charts.Radio 1 DJ Richard Skinner made the song his record of the week on his Saturday afternoon show. Taking control of the copyright of her material, Tzuke and Paul set up a studio in their home and the 1992 album Wonderland was released on the Essential Label in September 1992, with two single releases, "Wonderland" and "Fly", which were performed on the BBC1 lunchtime programme "Pebble Mill At One" opening and closing the show in November 1992. Neither album nor singles charted, but the album gained good reviews and featured the talents of Brian May from Queen and Nigel Kennedy on violin. Tzuke stated in a later interview used in the inner booklet of the reissue of the album in 2002 that Wonderland was the album she felt most proud of as a songwriter. Most of the album was co-written with Bob Noble. Autumn 1992 saw a small tour, this time playing at much smaller venues spread out between early October and late November 1992 using the musicians who played upon the album. August 1995 saw the release of two albums. The BBC issued its recording of the September 1981 concert and Polygram issued a compilation album called Stay With Me Till Dawn which drew on Tzuke's first three albums released on Rocket with tracks from the Turning Stones Polydor release. The album included four single remixes which had not previously been available on CD. Under the Angels was issued on Big Moon Records in October 1996, Tzuke and Paul's own record label. With Big Moon Records, Tzuke's audience has grown steadily; Tzuke toured Under the Angels and released a live CD, Over the Moon (1997), and went on to record a second studio album, Secret Agent (1999). Bob Harris of BBC Radio 2 included one of her songs, "Tonight" (from Secret Agent), on his compilation CD. In 2000 Elton John was persuaded to give back to Tzuke the rights to her first three albums recorded under Rocket Records; Tzuke named her tour later that year the "Phoenix Tour," a reference to her last Rocket Records album, "I Am the Phoenix." Following this came a new live album (Six Days Before the Flood, 2000), a new studio album (Queen Secret Keeper, 2001) and a third live album (Drive Live, 2002). In 2004 musician Mylo sampled "Stay With Me Till Dawn" on "Need You Tonite" from his debut album Destroy Rock & Roll. The level of Tzuke's success under Big Moon has been such that she has been approached by a number of well-known artists to work as a songwriter. Over the last few years, Tzuke has contributed vocals and co-written with a varied selection of artists, including 4 top 40 hits for Lucie Silvas and the majority of songs on her "Breath In" and "The Same Side" albums from 2005 and 2007. In 2006, Tzuke provided vocals for the song "Falling Down" for the group Hybrid and their album "I Choose Noise." January 2006 saw a Judie co-write "Strange Love" hit the UK top twenty for the group Phixx. Two Judie co-writes featured on Canadian identical twins Ryandan self-named release for Universal in 2007. "Like The Sun" and "High" were both released as singles. Their album reached number 7 in the UK album charts. In 2007, Tzuke released the album Songs 1, during her biggest tour in almost a decade, with her daughter Bailey Tzuke on backing vocals, and collaborations with other musicians, such as Gareth Gates on piano. June 2008 saw the release of Tzuke's sixteenth studio album, Songs 2. Judie co-wrote 4 tracks from releases by Morcheeba during 2008, and featured vocally on 2 tracks from the "Dive Deep" album, including the lead single "Enjoy The Ride". October/November 2008 saw Judie reach number 37 in the USA adult contemporary chart with a cover of "Captain Of The Heart" guesting on vocals for American Jazz combo Project Grand Slam on their self-titled album . The track was not officially released as a single, but through popularity with air play and downloading became a chart success. Hot on the heels of this there was an official USA release (via CD Baby only) and international download release of the single "Christmas And I'm Home". Judie recorded versions of the song with Haim Cotton, pianist with Project Grand Slam. Proceeds from sales went to the New York Ronald McDonald's charity. On 18 July 2009 Judie took part in a Teenage Cancer benefit concert at Kilworth House, Leicestershire alongside Lucie Silvas, performing 3 tracks solo (Love me No More, Stay With Me Till Dawn and If [When You're Gone]) accompanied by a string quartet. Judie returned to the stage for an encore performance alongside Lucie singing their co-written "Place To Hide" as a duet, receiving a standing ovation from th entire audience. Judie Tzuke is due to release a thirty year celebratory double-album titled "Moon On a Mirrorball" which will feature over thirty songs from her back catalogue, re-recorded songs and some new songs, one of which, "If (When You Go)", was performed on Michael Ball's Radio 2 show in August 2009. "Moon On A Mirror Ball" will be released on 19 April 2010 by WRASSE Records (WRASS259). The 33 tracks include four new songs. On March 16, 2010 Wrasse records re-released all the Big Moon back catalogue as downloads. 12 April 2010 sees the release of the single "If (When You Go)" by Wrasse. 19 April also sees the physical re-issue of Judie's first album "Welcome To The Cruise". Wrasse also have plans to re-issue Judie's 1989 album "Turning Stones". A planned tour for June 2010 to promote "Moon On A Mirrorball" has been delayed until October 2010, with a special concert planned at Islington's Union Chapel for Thursday 7 October.

MORE

Born Judie Myers in London on April 3, 1956, British pop/rock singer Judie Tzuke enjoyed some commercial success in her homeland for a spell during the 1980s, but was not able to translate it stateside. Judie's Polish immigrant parents had changed their last names from Tzuke to Myers shortly after relocating to England (it was a common last name in their new home of Yorkshire), but by the time Judie began establishing her singing career, she had decided to use original family surname. Both of Tzuke's parents were involved in music: her father, Sefton Myers, managed artists and singers (and supported both Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice as the duo penned Jesus Christ Superstar), while her mother, Jean Silverside, acted in several popular films and TV shows. By her teenage years, Judie began penning poems and setting them to a guitar accompaniment, showcasing her original compositions at local folk clubs. Soon after, Tzuke met a songwriting collaborator in Mike Paxman, and the duo (known as Tzuke & Paxo) caught the attention of renowned producer Tony Visconti, who signed them to his Good Earth record label. The duo only managed to issue an obscure, lone 1977 single, "These are the Laws" b/w "It's Only Fantasies," before Tzuke was signed as a solo artist to Elton John's Rocket label (Paxman would remain on board, however, as a singer/guitarist/songwriter for several years). Tzuke first issued a single for her new label, "For You," which was a moderate success on U.K. radio (scraping the Top 40), but around the time of the release of her full-length debut in 1979, Welcome to the Cruise, Tzuke scored a more substantial hit with "Stay with Me 'Till Dawn," which resulted in the song staying on the British charts for 16 weeks and several appearances on the popular Tops of the Pops TV program. Despite landing a prime touring spots opening for her pal Elton John (and playing to an estimated 450,000 people at New York's Central Park), John's label switched distribution in the U.S. around this time, which made it increasingly hard to find Tzuke's music in record stores. Despite it all, Tzuke's career continued to prosper in England, resulting in such further popular releases as 1980's Sportscar, 1981's I Am the Phoenix, and 1982's Shoot the Moon (in addition to appearances at British festivals and a pair of sold-out shows at the Hammersmith Odeon). Tzuke hoped that signing with a new label (Chrysalis) would bring her recording career to the next level. This, unfortunately, proved not to be the case, as Tzuke appeared to be lost in the shuffle when she issued her next studio release, Ritmo, in 1983. Undeterred, Tzuke continued to issue further albums, including 1985's The Cat Is Out (recorded entirely at her home studio), 1989's Turning Stones, 1991's Left Hand Talking, and 1996's Wonderland (which featured a cameo by Queen guitarist Brian May). Tzuke formed her own record label, Big Moon Records, shortly thereafter, which issued Under the Angels and the in-concert Over the Moon in 1997; Secret Agent followed in 1998, as well as another live set, Six Days Before the Flood, in 2000. Around the same time, Elton John decided to return the copyrights of Tzuke's first three (and most popular) albums back to her, which resulted in all being remastered and reissued on Big Moon. Tzuke's next studio effort, Queen Secret Keeper, was released in 2001, with an all-covers album, The Beauty of Hindsight, following in 2003. The 2004 album After the End of the Beginning preceded her two-volume Songs series, with the first volume (2007) focusing on her softer material while the second (2008) favored rock. Two years later, her career-spanning Moon on a Mirrorball was supported by a tour of the U.K. © Greg Prato © 2011 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/artist/judie-tzuke-p133442/biography

27.11.11

Moon



Moon - Turning The Tides - 1977 - Epic

Moon was an early to mid-70's UK R&B/soul/funk/jazz rock band formed by Noel McCalla (ex-Manfred Mann's Earth Band). Between 1975 and 1977 the band recorded two albums, and were quite popular, especially on the London pub scene. The band also toured extensively, supporting artists like Joan Armatrading, and the Average White Band. Most of the band's material was written by session guitarist Loz Netto, but the band covered many songs including Van Morrison's "Moondance" and Steely Dan's "Night By Night". Moon played some of Britain's biggest concert venues including The Hammersmith Odeon, The Rainbow, The Fairfield Halls etc. The band recorded 4 sessions for the late, great John Peel's BBC Radio One programme at BBC's Maida Vale studios. "Turning The Tides" was produced by Barry Blue ("Dancin' On A Saturday Night"), but the less said about that, the better!. "Turning The Tides" is quite a good album, with excellent musicianship, and good vocal harmonics, and contains plenty of catchy AWB type soul grooves, although the album is probably more jazz rock than soul. The album here is a vinyl rip, so please make allowances for sound quality. Check out Moon's "Too Close for Comfort" album, and read Loz Netto's bio @ http://www.loznetto.co.uk/HTML_files/biog.html [All tracks @ 192 Kbps: File size = 57.4 Mb]

TRACKS

A1 The Name Of The Game 5:10
A2 Broken Hearts (At High School) 3:51
A3 I'm Leaving You 6:00
A4 This Is Your Life 5:50

B1 All Night 5:17
B2 Back Rooms 3:59
B3 White Paper Time 4:12
B4 Sweet Virginia 3:00
B5 Cruisin' 5:46

All tracks composed by Loz Netto except "White Paper Time" by Loz Netto, Ron Lawrence, Nicky Payn, Moon and "Sweet Virginia" by Graham Collyer, Nicky Payn

BAND

Lead, Slide, Acoustic Guitar - Loz Netto
Rhythm Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Whistle - Graham Collyer
Bass - Ron Lawrence
Keyboards, Lead Vocals - Noel McCalla
Drums, Percussion - John Shearer
Alto Saxophone, Flute, Congas, Percussion - Doug Bainbridge
Saxophone, Flute, Harmonica - Nicky Payn

ABOUT NOEL MCALLA

Noel McCalla (born 4 November 1956 in London, England) is a British rock singer. He was the lead vocalist for the rock group Manfred Mann's Earth Band from 1991 until September 2009, when his mutually accepted departure was announced. He was replaced as the band's vocalist by Peter Cox (musician), best known for his work as lead singer of Go West (band). McCalla first became involved with the band in 1990, featuring on the Plains Music album, and thereafter toured extensively with them, also featuring on the studio albums Soft Vengeance and 2006, and the live album Mann Alive. He was previously a member of the band Moon. He sang on Mike Rutherford's solo album Smallcreep's Day and on Morrissey-Mullen's 1985 This Must Be the Place. His fifteen-year-old son Mali Michael-McCalla competed for a place in Britain's fifth series of the talent competition X-Factor in 2008, but did not progress to the Live Final stages. Noel Lincoln McCalla was born on 4th November 1956, to Hubert Sylvester McCalla, a minister in a gospel church, and Elizabeth Victoria McCalla, in North London, England. Including himself, there were eight children in the family.McCalla attended Alexandra Park infant school in London, but was withdrawn at the age of nine, as the family moved to Coventry, where he finished his primary school tuition at Hillfarm Junior School. Studying at Barkers Butts Secondary School, Noel McCalla began to realise he had musical potential, and dropped out of school at fifteen to work with a band known as Black and White Notes - gigging, and eventually supporting The Shadows. Later, he joined a band called Moon, who were signed to record label Epic Records. After splitting from the band, he stayed with Epic Records, releasing an album. In 1972, McCalla left his family in Coventry to move back to London. From 1977, he worked for a while with Sniff And The Tears as a backing vocalist. During this time, he worked as a freelance musician, and, by 1981, he had decided to form his own band, which he had named Contact. They played to the public and produced a cassette, which was sold at gigs. In 1993, the band's name changed to McCalla, and they released “Push and Pull”, followed by “Hot From The Smoke" in 1995. Throughout these years, he had much interest from Manfred Mann, and, in 1990, he became the Earthband's lead singer, and began touring both nationally and overseas. With this, came a lot of success, and one of their highest achievements was performing at Wembley Arena, where they supported headliners Status Quo in December of 2008. From mid 2006, whilst being the lead singer for Manfred Mann's Earth Band, he started to collaborate with jazz band Dave Lewis 1Up. He continues to work with them on some accounts, but most of his work is with Manfred Mann touring in Europe.

Amos Garrett



Amos Garrett - The Acoustic Album - 2004 - Stony Plain Records

The title pretty much sets the mood for this all new recording from this venerable musician. The title also indicates just how modest and low key his approach to music is. He comes from the less is more side of the equation. It’s a mix of originals and covers from the likes of Hoagy Carmichael, Jelly Roll Morton, Leadbelly and others. Fans of the Grisman and Garica recordings will want to add this to their collection of acoustic must have. He’s been around forever so it’s easy to take a musician like him for granted. However he doesn’t record much these days and that makes this one even more special. © http://www.villagerecords.com/product_info.php?products_id=2072

In his career, guitarist/singer Amos Garrett has played country, folk, rock & roll, jug music, and some jazz. Born in Detroit, he has primarily worked in Canada, being a busy studio guitarist in addition to having his own solo projects. Acoustic Album lives up to its name, featuring Garrett on a variety of good-time music that includes some swing (including a couple Hoagy Carmichael tunes), country, folk, and roots music. Garrett's easygoing and warm baritone voice, friendly style, and fluent guitar picking make Acoustic Album a delightful set, one well worth savoring. © Scott Yanow © 2011 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/album/acoustic-album-r703947

This CD is placed in the blues category for only one reason; the media kit states File Under Blues. The music of master guitarist Amos Garrett has always defied classification. From his early work with Geoff and Maria Muldaur to Anne Murray and a half dozen years with Paul Butterfield’s classic band Better Days, Garrett played whatever the occasion demanded and he played it better than most. With more than 200 studio sessions under his belt, he has become the definitive studio guitarist. Born in Detroit, Garrett moved to Canada as a youngster with his family. After 40 years in the music business and much of the studio work behind him, the guitarist lives quietly in rural Alberta. He continues to tour and just returned from performances in France, Italy, Belgium and Switzerland in time for the Edmonton Folk Festival. Amos Garrett has led the house band at the esteemed festival for twenty years. This is his first acoustic album and Garrett’s laid back style comes to the forefront. Since coming to international prominence with the beautiful guitar solo on Maria Muldaur’s Midnight At the Oasis in 1973, Garrett became famous for performances that are both relaxed and classy. In fact, the guy is so relaxed that fans who purchase a CD from his website receive a fishing fly, hand-tied by Amos. If a musician of Garrett’s high standing decides to record an acoustic album in Canada, it’s almost an obligation to hire Ken and Chris Whiteley for the session. The Whiteley brothers have more acoustic blues and good time music experience than anyone in the country. From their Original Sloth Band in the 70s to their recent Old Friends albums with Mose Scarlett and Jackie Washington, the brothers offer a timeless quality and sincerity in their music. The addition of David Wilkie on mandolin is another asset to this album. When these folks jam together, nothing is sacred. From Hoagy Carmichael’s classic Small Fry and Hong Kong Blues to Garrett’s own Bailey Hill Requiem the session is pure pleasure. If you’re a traditional guitar fan, you’ll enjoy the record. If you like Leon Redbone, you’ll LOVE this CD. Redbone and Garrett have much in common and one of those things is the pure joy and satisfaction that comes with a great session. Rating: Four Stars Written by & © Richard Bourcier © 1997 - 2011 jazzreview.com | All rights reserved http://www.jazzreview.com/reviews/latest-cd-track-reviews/item/21438-.html

Guitar Player magazine called him "one of the most lyrical and original guitarists playing today...his single note solos and melodic figures are so distinctive that it is virtually impossible to mistake them for anyone else’s. The late Chet Atkins, and Richard Thompson and Mark Knopfler have all lauded Garrett's unique guitar technique. Amos Garrett is a fabulous musician, and vocalist, and although he remains unfamiliar to many people, he is an amazing talent, and has played with some of the greatest musicians of all time, including Bonnie Raitt, Geoff Muldaur, Stevie Wonder, Emmylou Harris, Jesse Winchester, and Paul Butterfield. His guitar playing has to be heard to be believed. "The Acoustic Album" features tracks written by Leadbelly and Hoagy Carmichael, among others. It was nominated for a 2005 Juno Award. The album has elements of jazz, swing, soul, R&B, rockabilly, country, and of course The Blues, and is HR by A.O.O.F.C. Try and find the 1978 "Geoff & Amos" album, which Amos recorded with the great American folk/roots blues legend, Geoff Muldaur. Try and listen to his "Go Cat Go" album. Buy his superb "I Make My Home in My Shoes" album. Amos' "Buried Alive in the Blues" album is @ AMOSG.BAITB [All tracks @ 320 Kbps: File size = 96.6 Mb]

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1 She Don't Go Nowhere ('Till the Stars Come Out at Night) - Paul Geremia 2:35
2 Sam's Song - Jack Elliott, Lew Quadling 5:07
3 Perfume and Tobacco - Chris Whiteley 4:09
4 Judgement Day - Jim Condie 3:19
5 Hong Kong Blues - Hoagy Carmichael 2:57
6 Michigan Water Blues - Traditional 3:10
7 I Hate Myself - Jeff Gutcheon 3:11
8 Bailey Hill Requiem - Amos Garrett 2:47
9 Always Got Your Hands on That Guitar - Ken Whiteley 3:30
10 Grasshoppers in My Pillow - Traditional 3:05
11 Small Fry - Hoagy Carmichael 3:21
12 Some Musician Was to Blame - Chris Whiteley 3:43

MUSICIANS

Amos Garrett (6 & 12 string guitar, vocals)
Ken Whiteley (guitars, banjo, mandolin, accordion, percussion, tenor vocal, background vocals)
David Wilkie (mandolin, mandola, mandocello, vocals on 5 tracks)
Victor Bateman (string bass on 8 tracks), choir, chorus
John Hyde (string bass on 4 tracks)
Bucky Berger (percussion on 1 track)
Chris Whiteley (trumpet on track 8)
David Wall - tenor vocal, background vocals
Chick Roberts, Brently Titcomb, Liam Titcomb, Dave Lang, Eve Goldberg, Sandy Crawley - choir, chorus

ABOUT AMOS GARRETT

Detroit native Amos Garrett began working as a professional guitarist north of the border in Toronto. There he played with the Dirty Shames, a folk jug band, before moving on to the country-rock-oriented Great Speckled Bird at the invitation of Ian and Sylvia Tyson. Maria Muldaur's "Midnight at the Oasis" features his guitar playing, as does Anne Murray's "Snowbird." Other artists who have utilized his talent include Stevie Wonder, Emmylou Harris, Jesse Winchester, Paul Butterfield, Hungry Chuck, and Geoff Muldaur. His studio work led him to California, and he continued to record with other artists. Later, with the Eh Team backing him, Garrett also put out his own recordings, more than half a dozen on Stony Plain Records. In 1989, his album The Return of the Formerly Brothers, garnered a Juno Award. The release also featured Gene Taylor (formerly of Downchild, the Blasters, and later with the Fabulous Thunderbirds) and Doug Sahm of the Texas Tornados. Garrett and the Eh Team continue to play nightspots in Canada, where he resides in Alberta. He toured Japan in 1990, with stops in Kyoto, Osaka, and Tokyo. The concerts there found their way onto a live album. © Linda Seida, allmusic.com

BIO (WIKIPEDIA)

Amos Garrett (born November 26, 1941, Detroit, Michigan, USA) is a Juno Award-winning American-Canadian musician, performer, and author. He holds dual citizenship and was raised in Toronto and Montreal. He is best known for his guitar solo on Maria Muldaur's recording "Midnight at the Oasis". Over the course of his career, Garrett has recorded with more than 150 artists, ranging from Stevie Wonder, Todd Rundgren and Pearls Before Swine to Emmylou Harris, Bonnie Raitt and Martin Mull. He can be heard on Anne Murray's chart-topping rendition of "Snowbird". Garrett was born in Detroit, Michigan, USA on November 26, 1941. When he was five, he was moved to Toronto, Ontario, Canada. He studied piano and trombone through the Royal Conservatory of Music of Toronto. At twelve, Garrett relocated to Montreal, Quebec, Canada, where he began playing guitar at fourteen. There, at the Esquire Club, he would learn while watching performers such as Ben E. King, T-Bone Walker, Fats Domino and B. B. King. After an attempt to study English literature at a university in the USA, he chose a career in music and moved back to Toronto in 1962. Garrett's first professional gig was accompanying Mike Settle at Carnegie Hall in the winter of 1963. Settle was the opening act for comedian Vaughn Meader. From 1964 to 1967, Garrett played in the Toronto jug/string band, The Dirty Shames, which included Chick Roberts, Jim McCarthy and Carol Robinson. It was during this period that Garrett and Roberts took John Hammond, Jr. to see Levon & The Hawks for the first time. The Hawks would later be recommended by Hammond to Bob Dylan. In 1968, Garrett began a two-year stint of touring and recording with Canadian duo Ian & Sylvia, which led to becoming a founding member of Great Speckled Bird. This band is featured in the film Festival Express. They are shown playing the song "C.C. Rider" with members of the Grateful Dead and Delaney Bramlett in 1970. As a special feature on the DVD release of the film, Great Speckled Bird are shown playing the Dylan/Manuel song, "Tears of Rage". Garrett moved to Woodstock, New York in 1970 to play in Maria and Geoff Muldaur's band. Based there, he performed and recorded with artists that were part of Albert Grossman's Bearsville stable, such as Bobby Charles, Todd Rundgren and Jesse Winchester, and as a member of Paul Butterfield's group, Better Days. He was also a member of Hungry Chuck, another Bearsville act, which was formed of ex-Great Speckled Bird members. They released an eponymous album in 1972. Garrett also played trombone on two songs for Jerry Garcia's second solo album, Compliments, released in 1974. After living in Boston for two years, Garrett moved to San Francisco in 1976 to pursue session work. There, he continued as member and bandleader of Maria Muldaur's group until 1978, toured the R&B circuits of North America, and recorded with more than 150 artists. “I wanted to sing. I loved to sing, but there was no way I could do so being a hired gun for bands.” - Amos Garrett. In 1978, Garrett decided to pursue fronting his own project, left Muldaur's group, and began releasing material through Stony Plain Records, a label based in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. His first solo album was 1980's Go Cat Go, which was followed by Amosbehavin in 1982. He formed his back-up band, The 'Eh Team, around this time. Garrett shared performing and recording duties, and co-wrote two songs, on 1988's The Return of the Formerly Brothers with the late Doug Sahm and pianist Gene Taylor. Queen Ida sat in on accordion. The album was awarded the inaugural, 1989, Juno Award for Best Roots & Traditional Album. A follow-up live album, Live In Japan, was recorded in 1990 as Garrett, Sahm and Tayor played clubs and concert halls in Tokyo, Osaka and Kyoto. In 1989, Garrett relocated to Turner Valley, Alberta. That year also brought the album I Make My Home in My Shoes, which paid tribute to his boyhood days, especially on "Stanley Street", a song written in recollection of the Esquire Club. Garrett began his intermittent role as bandleader and/or member of the Edmonton Folk Music Festival's Festival House Band in 1990, reprising it from 1994–2000, from 2002–2006, and from 2008–2011. With Garrett, the band has backed such acts as Richard Thompson, Solomon Burke, Ruth Brown, Rick Danko, Jay McShann, Johnnie Johnson and Rosco Gordon. Third Man In, released in 1992, was a collection of covers and originals. Garrett's covers were written by the likes of Bobby Charles and Percy Mayfield. Off The Floor Live followed in 1996. It was recorded live with the 'Eh Team at the Sidetrack Club in Edmonton. The Cold Club was a collaboration with Oscar Lopez, David Wilkie, Karl Roth and Ron Casat. They released an eponymous record in 1996. Maria Muldaur, Mike Lent and Teddy Borowiecki guested on the album. Garrett released Amos Garrett's Acoustic Album in 2004. It features tracks written by Leadbelly and Hoagy Carmichael, among others. It was nominated for a 2005 Juno Award. This was followed by 2008's release, Get Way Back: A Tribute to Percy Mayfield, which was also nominated for a Juno Award. Garrett was living in High River, Alberta in 2008. On November 6, 2011, Garrett will be conducting a clinic and then performing as part of the Sleepwalk Guitar Festival in Toronto. The festival is presented by Six Shooter Records and will be curated by Luke Doucet. Garrett has authored a number of instructional albums, books and videos. Garrett enjoys fishing, and hopes to one day catch an Atlantic Salmon of twenty pounds or greater.

25.11.11

Laurence Juber



Laurence Juber - PCH - 2007 - Solid Air

On PCH, the incomparable ex-Wings lead guitarist Laurence Juber plays an eclectic mix of ensemble tunes and solo acoustic instrumentals covering rock, jazz, and blues. There are nine LJ originals and stunning cover versions of classics like "Let's Stay Together", "All Of Me" and "Layla". Laurence's demonstrates his complex and and unique fingerpicking acoustic guitar style throughout. Joining LJ on a few tracks are Leland Sklar on Bass, Russ Kunkel on Drums and Jim Cox on Keys. "PCH" is VHR by A.O.O.F.C [All tracks @ 320 Kbps: File size = 62.8 Mb]. Check this blog for more LJ releases, and more detailed info on this guitar maestro

TRACKS

1 PCH
2 Temple Bar
3 Wayfaring Stranger
4 Layla
5 Gardenia
6 Castle Walls
7 Let's Stay Together
8 Bullet Train Boogie
9 All of Me
10 Blue Guitar Blues
11 PCH Solo Mix (Bonus)
12 Gardenia Solo Mix (Bonus)
13 Castle Walls Solo Mix (Bonus)

All tracks composed by Laurence Juber except Track 3 (Trad.), Track 4 by Eric Clapton & Jim Gordon, Track 7 by Al Green, Al Jackson, Jr, Willie Mitchell, and Track 9 by Gerald Marks & Seymour Simons

MUSICIANS

Laurence Juber - Guitar (Acoustic), Guitar (Electric)
Leland Sklar - Bass
Jim Cox - Fender Rhodes, Organ (Hammond), Piano
Russ Kunkel - Drums

Saiichi Sugiyama



Saiichi Sugiyama - Saiichi Sugiyama - 1994 - Blue Water Records

The eleven tracks on Saiichi's first album were recorded in two separate sessions. The seven original songs were recorded with Saiichi's touring band members at Rockfield Studios in Monmouth, Wales (built by Dave Edmonds) in April 1994. The remaining blues tracks came out of Saiichi jamming with guest musicians such as Zoot Money, and The Cutting Crew rhythm section at Jacobs Studios in Farnham, Surrey later in 1994. Much of the material on many of the tracks was recorded live in the studio. Saiichi's guitar solos on Somewhere Down the Road, China Doll, What's Going On, as well as all of the solos on the blues tracks are first takes. The basic tracks were overdubbed at Jacobs where amongst other things, percussion, horn sections, backing vocals, guitar parts, and voices of Japanese crickets were added. The sessions were engineered by Phil Ault who worked on Free's Heartbreaker album at Island Studios. Saiichi's guitar sound on the album is often reminiscent of the great Paul Kossoff

In 1975, aged 15, Saiichi Sugiyama saw an Eric Clapton concert at Tokyo's Budokan. Shortly after, while still living in Tokyo, he formed his first blues band. In 1980, he moved to Surrey, England, and is still playing the English blues circuit. In 1990, He joined up with drummer Paul Olsenwith (ex-Graham Bond Organization) and the former X-Production bassist, Marco Frangos, in the power blues trio, Bluewater, playing the London blues club circuit. In 1993, after Bluewater split, Saiichi started played "solo" gigs backed by drummer Justin Hildreththe, the ex-Walk on Fire musicians, bassist Phil Williams and rhythm guitarist Mike Casswell (of the late Cozy Powell Band). With this band, aided by the the British blues veteran Zoot Money and the rhythm section of erstwhile Cutting Crew, Saiichi recorded this great s/t album which is HR by A.O.O.F.C. The album features seven originals firmly rooted in the blues/R&B style that Saiichi absorbed in his early years, and feature his unique sense of melody, especially in his "China Doll," reputed to be a closet classic for those who are appreciative of his particular style of music. The album received good reviews with a lot of British radio airplay. Check out his "So Am I" album on this blog. Saiichi remains an underappreciated guitarist, and deserves more recognition for his important contribution to British Blues and R&B. Buy his "SAIICHI" album and support this guy! [All tracks @ 320 Kbps: File size = 110 Mb]

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1 Somewhere Down The Road - Saiichi Sugiyama
2 Magic Wand - Saiichi Sugiyama
3 China Doll - Saiichi Sugiyama
4 Pretty Tanya - Saiichi Sugiyama
5 Who's Been Talking - Chester Burnet
6 Hold On - Saiichi Sugiyama
7 What's Going On? - Saiichi Sugiyama
8 Sweet Little Angel - Jules Taub & Riley King
9 Never Turn Back - Saiichi Sugiyama
10 Crosscut Saw - R.B. Ford & R.G. Ford
11 T'Ain't Nobody's Bizness - Prince Robert Graham, Porter Grainger, Clarence Williams

MUSICIANS

Saiichi Sugiyama - Guitar, Vocals
Mike Caswell - Rhythm Guitar
Colin Farley, Phil Williams - Bass
Zoot Money - Hammond Organ
Andy Smith - Keyboards
Martin "Frosty" Beedle, Justin Hildreth - Drums
Steve Williams - Percussion
Tony Collins - Backing Vocals

BIO

As a young child Saiichi was an inveterate "song inventor," singing songs he made up to amuse himself. One of his earliest memories was singing cartoon title-songs on stage with a full band behind him at a function to which he and his father were invited. Well before he took up the guitar, Saiichi wrote "radio" plays complete with soundtracks, and directed his school friends in recorded productions of them. The Beatles' music was constantly in the background then, even in Asakusa, downtown Tokyo where Saiichi was born and raised. This abiding creative activity with all that wonderful music as the background fabric of his existence was a harbinger of things to come... In 1972 when Saiichi got his first guitar at the age of 12 (a Yamaha acoustic), he was wanting to emulate the sound of Crosby Stills Nash & Young, which obviously took him a bit longer than if he was aiming at something a little more straight forward - but he says he has always followed his heart even from a young age. Saiichi straight away started making up what he later learnt to be open chords right up the neck before he mastered the lower position chords. He then befriended the late Tommy Hidaka, a member of the Tokyo group GARO who had major chart hits and were well-known for their impeccable CSN&Y covers. Tommy showed him a few more open chords and tunings and Saiichi was on his way. Saiichi then "met the blues" when he heard the track "Go Back Home" on Stephen Stills' first album, on which Eric Clapton was playing alongside Stills. Saiichi's quest for more of that "certain something" he found in that track led him to the Layla album, live Cream tracks, and finally to John Mayall's Blues Breakers album, with which the 13 year-old Saiichi found an immediate empathy. He started digging deeper into the blues, via B.B. King on Kent, Freddie King, Albert King, right on through Howlin' Wolf to Muddy Waters. Saiichi saw Clapton perform at Tokyo's Budokan in 1975 and formed his first blues band immediately after. Not satisfied playing with Japanese musicians of the day, Saiichi made plans to live abroad--England was calling. After a couple of summers spent in sunny California, Saiichi bit the musical bullet and moved to this green and pleasant (and rainy) land in 1980, home of his earliest musical influences, and decided to live in Surrey. Since then, Surrey has been his home. In 1990, Saiichi teamed up with the ex-Graham Bond Organization drummer, Paul Olsen, and the former X-Production bassist, Marco Frangos, in a power blues triumvirate known as Bluewater, playing the London blues club circuit. The Bluewater partnership with Maggie Ryder (ex-Eric Clapton), however, never went beyond the rehearsal studios as Maggie moved to New York. In 1993, after the dissolution of Bluewater, Saiichi started playing "solo" gigs backed by the ex-Walk on Fire partners, Phil Williams and Mike Casswell (of the late Cozy Powell Band fame) with Justin Hildreth (ex-Joan Armatrading) on the drums. It was with this line-up, augmented by the veteran of the British blues scene Zoot Money and the rhythm section of erstwhile Cutting Crew, that Saiichi recorded his eponymous album "SAIICHI SUGIYAMA" released in 1994. The album boasted seven of his compositions which, while firmly rooted in the blues and R&B Saiichi absorbed in his formative years, featured his unique sense of melody, particularly in the guise of "China Doll," reputed to be a closet classic for those who are appreciative of his particular style of music. The album was well received and got airplays on Jazz FM and various regional stations. His interview with BBC GLR and the appearance on Live TV alongside James Brown ensured that his gigs were packed out. His memorable jams from the nineties included appearances with the rhythm section of John Healy Band and Otis Grand as well as an evening of blues with Zoot Money. Saiichi's ever-evolving band in the 90's featured Boz Burrell (ex-Bad Company), John Cook (ex-Rory Gallagher), Terry Peak (ex-Champion Jack Dupree) and Sam Kelly (multiple-winner of the "best blues drummer in London" prize in the late nineties) among others. The last incarnation of his band featured Tim Weller and Paul Wassiff who went on to support Eric Clapton's Pilgrim US Tour as Distant Cousins. However, Saiichi was unable to get a record company backing, the typical response being "Great music but don't know how to market it" and the business side took its tool - Saiichi practically stopped gigging in 1996 - concentrating on writing just for himself. Saiichi's knowledge of vintage guitars also landed him the role of adviser to Richard Chapman, Christie's guitar consultant, in the auction sale of Clapton's guitars in 1999. This work resulted in Saiichi being comissioned to write various Clapton guitar related articles by Japanese publishers and eventually, his appointment as a consultant for the 2004 Eric Clapton Crossroads Guitar Auction at Christie's. His love of vintage Marshall amps also led him to the 1999 Ampaholics project, demonstrating the sound of various Marshall amps from the 60's on the Ampaholics CD. In 2001, Saiichi started performing on the London and Surrey circuit again with his own band, featuring new material and a new band with David Hadley-Ray, a bassist from Philadelphia, US, and Darby Todd on the drums. Saiichi first saw David play at a local blues jam when he accompanied his friend's young son, Andy Cortes, still learning to play, for moral support. Saiichi was seen gigging around Kingston and guesting on stage with his friends, John O'Leary--founder member of Savoy Brown, Gary Boner of Roadhouse, and Robin Bibi. Soon, Saiichi was rejoined by Sam Kelly on the drums, who played with him in the early '90s, and Saiichi Sugiyama and His Band was back in business. It was in 2001 through David Hadley-Ray's introduction that a collaboration which was to form the foundation of Saiichi's musical activities in the 2000s came into existence. Saiichi met and performed with the Cream lyricist, Pete Brown, at David's wife's birthday party held in the upstairs room in Paradise Bar, Kensal Rise, coincidentally the venue for the launch party for his first album on his birthday 30 Novemebr 1994. Pete began appearing at Saiichi's shows in 2002 playing percussion, singing backing vocals, and performing Cream classics with Saiichi. Through David's introduction, Saiichi also met Malcom Bruce, Jack Bruce's son, who played keyboards in Saiichi's band for a short period before his solo project took over. A Japanese record company executive happened to hear one such performance and requested Saiichi to let him include a live recording of it in his label's Cream tribute project. Instead of releasing live recording, Saiichi and Pete went into a studio with the live set-up, with Malcom on the keyboards and Darby on the drums, to cut four Cream tracks. These re-interpretations of Cream classics, produced and sang by Pete Brown (complete with the previously unreleased extra verses for Politician) were released on "Sunshine of Your Love"by Funai International/Universal Japan in December 2002. Following a spell in Tokyo after his father's death, Saiichi returned to England just before Christmas in 2002 and with Pete Brown's encouragement, started planning for and writing with him his new solo album since 1994. Pete and Saiichi assembled a team consisting of David Hadley-Ray on the bass, Zoot Money and Malcom Bruce on keyboards, Clem Clempson on rhythm guitar. Henry Spinetti, who was originally going to play the drums, was unable to attend due to the extra dates with Roger Chapman and Simon Edgoose took his place. After a week's preproduction in London, the recording session started at Chapel Studios in Lincolnshire in the spring of 2003 with Thunder's Ben Matthews engineering the session. After 10 days, the session moved to London for overdubbing horn sections, cello, flute and backing vocals. Among others, Henry Lowther played the trumpet. The session also saw Pete and Saiichi traveling to Tokyo to capture contribution from Mark Horiuchi of GARO, Saiichi's early musical influence. During the visit, Saiichi and Pete played a one-off gig in Tokyo. This was the first gig in Japan for Pete (and the first since 1978 for Saiichi) and combined with the fact that it was Mark Horiuchi's first recording in ten years, it resulted in much coverage by the local music press. The album production, which took over one year, finished in May 2004. The resulting 14 track album "So Am I" was released from Hendrixx Records in Japan on 20 July 2004 and features Saiichi's compositions and lyrics by Pete Brown. Advance orders on the album resulted in it reaching #604 on the Japanese Amazon.co.jp ranking on 27 June 2004. It received a critical acclaim from Japanese rock press, British blues publications and tracks from the album have been played on US, English, European and Japanese radio stations. In autumn of 2004, Saiichi and Pete returned to studio to cut Saiichi's re-interpretation of Beatle numbers for a Japanese project with Geoff Allen on drums, Clem Clempson on guitar, David Hadley-Ray on bass and David Munch Moore and Malcom Bruce on keyboards. The resultant four tracks were released on a compilation album "Blackbird" on Hendrixx label on 29 November 2004. Saiichi and Pete returned to Japan to play a 5 day mini-tour, starting in Hiroshima, in December to promote the "Blackbird" release. In the UK during 2004, Saiichi with his band featuring David Hadley-Ray on bass and Paddy Milner on keyboards appeared with the Yardbirds and Stan Webb's Chicken Shack. They also performed a one-off acoustic concert at the Jazz venue, Bull's Head in Barnes which was recorded for a possible release. A 6 page feature in the UK's Blues Matters! and appearing with the Yardbirds at thier Chritmas Party were a fitting conclusion of a busy year that 2004 was. 2005 kicked off with a Surrey date with Zoot Money and Pete Brown in Saiichi's band. In May, a compilation album entitled simply SAIICHI was released in UK featuring more Sugiyama-Brown tracks as well as the Beatles and Cream interpretations from the Japanese Hendrixx compilations. The release coincided with the Cream reunion concerts at the Royal Albert Hall and the album was launched at three London gigs by Saiichi Sugiyama Band featuring Pete Brown. The sell-out gig at the Hard Rock Cafe in London was packed with Cream fans visiting from all around the world. Later in the year, Saiichi started a new World Blues project with Helder Pack, the virtuoso drummer from Mozambique and his friend Mauricio Pena from Venezuela on the keyboard and a percussionist and a trumpet player. This unit with an idea to fuse Latin and African influences with Saiichi's brand of rock music eventually turned into Saiichi's new regular touring band and made its debut appearance to a packed crowd at Ealing Jazz and Blues Festival in August.2006 saw Saiichi continuing to work with his band as well as performing gigs entirely consisting of Cream numbers as a musical tribute. The idea was hatched by his friend Funky Paul Olsen, an artist, a drummer and a Cream fan. In July/August 2006, Saiichi performed in Shana Morrison Band for the 12 date UK leg of her European tour across the country. The band led by Shana, Van Morrison's daughter and an incredible blues singer in her own right, received fantastic reviews at their gigs around the country including a packed night at the Borderline in London. The tour culminated in an appearance at Summer Sundae Festival at De Montfort Hall in Leicester. After the Morrison tour, Saiichi teamed up again with Pete Brown to plan for his next projects - one involving a three way collaboration with Mark Horiuchi of GARO in Tokyo for a studio album and also Saiichi's next album consisting of his own materials. In a meanwhile, Saiichi is scheduled to perform a set of Cream music in a double-bill concert with Pete Brown's Interocetors at BoomBoom Club in September 2006. The story continues... © http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/saiichi2#

BIO (WIKI)

Saiichi Sugiyama (born 1960 in Tokyo, Japan) is a British-based guitarist, singer and composer, best known for his writing and performing collaborations with Pete Brown, the lyricist for Cream since 2002 to date. His previous bands in 1990s featured Mike Casswell and Phil Williams of Walk on Fire, Andy Smith of Hot Chocolate, Zoot Money, Boz Burrell of Bad Company, John Cook of Rory Gallagher band as well as the guitarist, Paul Wassif. Sugiyama was the lead guitarist in the band of Shana Morrison, the daughter of Van Morrison in her UK tour of 2006 and on her return to the UK in 2010. Sugiyama's studio albums in 2000s featured Clem Clempson of Colosseum, Pete Brown (who co-wrote and co-produced the albums), Zoot Money and Ben Matthews of Thunder. His British blues-based lead guitar style as well as his association with 1999 and 2004 Crossroads Centre guitar auctions at Christie's (as a guitar consultant) resulted in Sugiyama being labelled as a "Japanese Clapton" in the London blues clubs despite his remonstrations. Sugiyama plays a Gibson Les Paul guitar and Marshall amplifiers. His fluid and conversational guitar style does have a resmblance to Eric Clapton, Peter Green and has a vibrato technique similar that of Paul Kossoff whereas his singing style is of his own. Sugiyama collaborates with Mark Horiuchi, the former lead singer of the Japanese rock band Garo (Japanese rock group) who had a number of chart hits in the Japanese chart in the early 1970s and the duo recorded several tracks which were included in the album "So Am I" released in Japan in 2004. Sugiyama moved from Tokyo to England in 1980 and has lived in Surrey and London since then. He also runs his legal practice for the Japanese community in London and has one son with his English wife.

23.11.11

Jack Bruce



Jack Bruce - Willpower: A Twenty Year Retrospective - 1989 - Polydor

It was with John Mayall’s Bluebreakers that Eric Clapton first accrued status as Britain’s premier guitar hero. His groundbreaking electric blues playing made such an impact on fans that graffiti-type scribblings of “Clapton is God” became the favored slogan on London walls. His stint with the Bluesbreakers made him a star in the U.K., but with Cream, Clapton would establish himself as an icon on both sides of the Atlantic. It was with this super-trio that Clapton, bassist/vocalist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker would experience real commercial success and international recognition. From 1966 to 1968, Cream would record future classics like “Sunshine of Your Love”, “White Room”, “Crossroads”, “I Feel Free” and “Badge”, while at the same time pushing the boundaries of live performance with their improvisational prowess. Following the demise of Cream, Eric Clapton continued to thrive musically, and the hits of every subsequent decade have included his music—from songs like “Layla”, “I Shot the Sheriff”, and “Lay Down Sally” to “Forever Man”, “She’s Waiting” and “Running on Faith”, to “Tears in Heaven”, “Before You Accuse Me” and “Change the World”. Unlike Clapton, Jack Bruce hasn’t spent the last 30 years churning out readily accessible commercial songs, nor has he enjoyed high visibility on MTV and VH1—media that Clapton has used to great effect. For Bruce, commercial success seemingly began and ended with Cream. But while Clapton’s recent history has been well documented, to most, Jack Bruce’s is shrouded in mystery. A child prodigy, Jack Bruce was a multi-instrumentalist with a strong background in jazz and classical music who, at age 17, had won a scholarship to the Royal Scottish Academy of Music for cello and composition. By 1962, Bruce had landed his first important gig with Alexis Korner’s Blues, Inc., that included drummer Charlie Watts, who would later join the Rolling Stones. A year later, Bruce would join forces with organist Graham Bond, drummer Ginger Baker and guitarist John McLaughlin in what would later be known as the seminal Graham Bond Organization. A brief stint with the Bluesbreakers a few years later brought Bruce and Clapton together—a fateful meeting that would soon result in the successful association, Cream. With Cream, Eric Clapton would undoubtedly garner most of the attention, mainly out of his growing reputation as resident guitar god. But it was Jack Bruce’s presence that would prove paramount to the band’s impending success; he penned most of Cream’s original material with lyrical collaborator Pete Brown. Without Jack Bruce there would’ve been no “Sunshine of Your Love”, “White Room”, “I Feel Free” or “Deserted Cities of the Heart”, nor would Cream have had his distinctive, powerful vocals to propel most of the band’s catalog. In the end, it was Bruce who felt that he had strayed too far from his roots, and that perhaps Cream had gone as far as it possibly could. His desire to create new and untapped forms of music was too great to ignore, and his vision could never really be accomplished with Cream. So with the band’s demise, Jack Bruce dove head first into as many diverse collaborations as possible, with the goal of pushing the envelope of musical tradition. His ‘70s experience would commence after the release of his critically acclaimed solo debut, Songs for a Tailor (1969). Throughout the decade Bruce would work simultaneously in series of rock, jazz and classical formats, collaborating with Tony Williams Lifetime, jazz guitarist Larry Coryell, Frank Zappa, Lou Reed, Robin Trower, Leslie West and Corky Laing, while interspersing several fine solo records in the process. Ironically, Jack Bruce’s Willpower: A Twenty Year Retrospective, originally released in 1989, features none of the collaborative efforts previously mentioned, but focuses almost exclusively upon his ‘70s solo ventures. Of the album’s 17 tracks only two Cream tracks—the classic “White Room” and the haunting, open-tuned acoustic number “As You Said”—made the final cut. Eric Clapton also makes an appearance on two previously unreleased songs, “Ships in the Night” and the title track. Although recorded in 1987, “Willpower” sounds as if it jumped off of Disraeli Gears with Clapton reverting back to his classic Cream guitar sound. Recorded during the same sessions, “Ships in the Night” features a breathtaking duet between Bruce and vocalist Maggie Reilly, with Clapton rounding out the song with a blistering yet poignant guitar statement. In essence, the rest of Willpower lifts equally from Songs for a Tailor, Harmony Row (1971), Out of the Storm (1974), How’s Tricks? (1977) and his unreleased 1978 effort, Jet Set Jewel. You won’t find any catchy pop here; instead, what is unearthed are sophisticated, cleverly written and arranged compositions that are designed to move the listener. Nowhere is this more true than on Bruce’s Procol Harum-ish tour-de-force, “Songs for an Imaginary Western” and the somber piano ballad, “Can You Follow?” The other magic moments that follow are just as impressive including “Rope Ladder to the Moon”, “Morning Story” and the jazzy, brass-infused, “Never Tell Your Mother She’s Out of Tune”. Willpower: A Twenty Year Retrospective serves as a perfect introduction to those unfamiliar with Jack Bruce’s post-Cream endeavors. This disc offers up the best of Jack Bruce, the brilliant multi-instrumentalist, profound vocalist, visionary songwriter and a musician who, 30 years after his greatest success, is still on a mission—even if most aren’t privy to it. By & © Scott Hudson 10 September 2001 © 1999-2011 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved http://www.popmatters.com/pm/review/brucejack-willpower

Willpower was really designed to be Jack Bruce's Crossroads -- it followed Clapton's monumental box by a year, had similar artwork, a similar approach that blended selections from throughout his various projects, and the same remastering/production team. Thing is, Bruce didn't have the commercial success of Clapton, nor did he have the same sizable following (although his fans were indeed devoted), and critics just sorta gave up paying attention around 1970, so there wasn't much of an audience for Willpower upon its release in 1989. Nevertheless, it's a pretty terrific summary of Bruce's career, never staying too long in one particular period (even the selections from Cream lack such heavy hitters as "Sunshine of Your Love" or "I Feel Free"), and encapsulating how unpredictable and adventurous Bruce's career has been. This is not heavy on hits, even if it has such signature songs as "White Room," "Theme for an Imaginary Western," "Never Tell Your Mother She's Out of Tune," "How's Tricks," and "As You Said," because Bruce never had that many hits, even radio hits. But it does provide a through, representative introduction. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine © 2011 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/album/willpower-a-twenty-year-retrospective-r78140

Check out West, Bruce and Laing's "Whatever Turns You On", BBM (Baker, Bruce, & Moore) "Around The Next Dream", Jack Bruce's "I've Always Wanted To Do This", Jack Bruce's "Shadows In The Air", Jack Bruce's "Spirit - Live At The BBC", and The Jack Bruce Band's "Live '75 (aka Live at the Manchester Free Trade Hall)" albums on this blog [All tracks @ 192 Kbps: File size = 100 Mb]

TRACKS

1 Willpower 4:18
2 As You Said 4:21
3 White Room 5:01
4 Rope Ladder to the Moon 2:53
5 Theme for an Imaginary Western 3:28
6 Never Tell Your Mother She's Out of Tune 3:40
7 Can You Follow? 1:31
8 Morning Story 4:55
9 Folk Song 4:17
10 Keep It Down 3:45
11 Pieces of Mind 5:40
12 Without a Word 5:21
13 How's Tricks? 4:12
14 Jet Set Jewel 5:22
15 Mickey the Fiddler 5:24
16 The Best Is Still to Come 4:11
17 Ships in the Night 5:15

All tracks composed by Jack Bruce & Pete Brown except "Willpower" by Jack Bruce, Peter Brown, & Paul Westerberg

MUSICIANS

Jack Bruce - Bass, Acoustic Guitar, Keyboards, Organ, Piano, Harmonium, Cello, Vocals
George Harrison, Eric Clapton, Chris Spedding, Clem Clempson, Steve Hunter - Guitar
Hugh Burns - Guitar, Vocals
Peter Weihe - Acoustic Guitar
Tony Hymas - Keyboards, String Arrangements, Vocals
Ginger Baker - Drums, Hi Hat, Tympani
Jim Keltner, Jim Gordon, Jon Hiseman, Stuart Elliott, John Marshall - Drums
Simon Phillips - Drums, Vocals
Dick Heckstall-Smith, Art Themen - Soprano Sax & Tenor Sax
Henry Lowther, Harry Beckett - Trumpet
Felix Pappalardi - Viola, Vocals
Maggie Reilly - Vocals

BIO

Although some may be tempted to call multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, and composer Jack Bruce a rock & roll musician, blues and jazz are what this innovative musician really loves. As a result, these two genres are at the base of most of the recorded output from a career that goes back to the beginning of London's blues scene in 1962. In that year, he joined Alexis Korner's Blues Incorporated. Throughout the following decades and into the 21st century, Bruce has always been a supreme innovator, pushing himself into uncharted waters with his jazz and folk-rock compositions. Bruce's most famous songs are, in essence, blues tunes: "Sunshine of Your Love," "Strange Brew," "Politician," and "White Room." Bruce's best-known songs remain those he penned for Cream, the legendary blues-rock trio he formed with drummer Ginger Baker and guitarist Eric Clapton in July 1966. Baker and Bruce played together for five years before Clapton came along, and although their trio only lasted until November 1968, the group is credited with changing the face of rock & roll and bringing blues to a worldwide audience. Through their creative arrangements of classic blues tunes like Robert Johnson's "Crossroads," Skip James' "I'm So Glad," Willie Dixon's "Spoonful," and Albert King's "Born Under a Bad Sign," the group helped popularize blues-rock and led the way for similar groups that came about later on, like Led Zeppelin. Bruce was born May 14, 1943, in Lanarkshire, near Glasgow, Scotland. His father was a big jazz fan, and so he includes people like Louis Armstrong and Fats Waller among his earliest influences. He grew up listening to jazz and took up bass and cello as a teen. After three months at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music, he left, disgusted with the politics of music school. After traveling around Europe for a while, he settled into the early blues scene in 1962 in London, where he eventually met drummer Ginger Baker. He played with British blues pioneers Alexis Korner and Graham Bond before leaving in 1965 to join John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, whose guitarist was Eric Clapton. This gave him time to get his chops together without having to practice. With Manfred Mann, who he also played with before forming Cream, Bruce learned about the business of making hit songs. Cream's reputation for long, extended blues jams began at the Fillmore in San Francisco at a concert organized by impresario Bill Graham. Bruce later realized that Cream gave him a chance to succeed as a musician, and admitted that if it weren't for that group, he might never have escaped London. After Cream split up in November 1968, Bruce formed Jack Bruce & Friends with drummer Mitch Mitchell and guitarist Larry Coryell. Recording-wise, Bruce took a different tack away from blues and blues-rock, leaning more in a folk-rock direction with his solo albums Songs for a Tailor (1969), Harmony Row (1971), and Out of the Storm (1974). In 1970 and 1971, he worked with Tony Williams Lifetime before putting together another power trio with guitarist Leslie West and drummer Corky Laing in 1972, simply called West, Bruce & Laing. After working with Frank Zappa on his album Apostrophe in 1974, Bruce was at it again in 1975 with the Jack Bruce Band, whose members included keyboardist Carla Bley and guitarist Mick Taylor. Back on the road in 1980 with Jack Bruce & Friends, the latter version of the group included drummer Billy Cobham, keyboardist David Sancious, and guitarist Clem Clempson, formerly of Humble Pie. In the early '80s, he formed another trio, B.L.T., this time with guitarist Robin Trower, before working with Kip Hanrahan on his three solo albums. Bruce's bluesiest albums include all of his work with Cream, the albums B.L.T. and Truce with Trower, some of his West, Bruce & Laing recordings, and several of his albums from the 1980s and early '90s. These include Willpower (PolyGram, 1989); A Question of Time (Epic Records, 1989), which includes guest performances by Albert Collins, Nicky Hopkins, and Baker; as well as his CMP Records live career-retrospective album, recorded in Cologne, France, Cities of the Heart (1993). Bruce released Monkjack in 1995, an album of his jazz piano compositions which he performs with organist Bernie Worrell, issued on CMP. Bruce recorded the fierce Shadows in the Air in 2001 with a new band called the Cuicoland Express that included Vernon Reid, Worrell, and Robby Ameen, and guest artists Eric Clapton and Dr. John for the CMC International/Sanctuary imprint. Bruce reunited with Robin Trower for 2008's Seven Moons, released on Evangeline Records, following it with Seven Moons Live a year later in 2009. In 2010 Bruce joined the Tony Williams Lifetime Tribute Band with Reid, organist John Medeski, and drummer Cindy Blackman and toured in the late part of the year and in early 2011 to sold-out performances and rave critical reviews. Also in 2011, Pledge Music, a company that pairs fans and artists to fund projects, released Jack Bruce and the Cuicoland Express Live at the Milky Way, from a 2001 concert in Amsterdam. The high-quality recording was provided by Bruce's daughters, who designed the cover as well. © Richard Skelly © 2011 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/artist/jack-bruce-p3787/biography

22.11.11

The Nimmo Brothers




The Nimmo Brothers - New Moon Over Memphis - 2003 - Armadillo

The Nimmo Brothers from Glasgow, Scotland are two of the most talented and exciting modern blues guitarists on the European circuit. At the British blues connection awards 2002 they won awards for best UK blues album and best UK blues band. The band have constantly sold out concert venues throughout the UK, Europe and the US. The brothers began playing as the popular Blackwater Blues band in the late 1990s, releasing a popular album called ‘Breaking out the Blues’ full of great blues tracks showcasing the brothers' influences which include musicians like B.B King, Eric Clapton, Peter Greens Fleetwood Mac, John Mayalls Bluesbreakers, and Free. Even today, Free remains Alan Nimmo's favourite band, and Paul Rodgers his favourite vocalist. In 1998 the Nimmo Brothers released their first album, "Moving On". 'New Moon Over Memphis' is the band's first acoustic album, featuring the beautiful John Hiatt song 'Feel Like Rain', and Andy Fraser & Paul Rodgers' "Be My Friend", but the album also focuses on the remarkable vocal and songwriting talents of The Nimmo Brothers. Speaking about the album, Alan said that, "On that album we have a good pal of ours called Mark McGee who played the saxophone solo, so Mark, myself and my brother would go out in Glasgow as a trio sometimes and do some acoustic stuff, and then Stephen and I got to writing some stuff and we wanted to do something more raw and naked. Literally, that’s all that album was, two or three guitars showing warts and all. It was a brave move but I thought it turned out really nice. We did a little bit of touring and it was really sweet to do that. It was nice to go out for the night with no pressure, not having to look after the band. We always found it very relaxing, just the two of us travelling in a car. That was really nice". "New Moon Over Memphis" is a great unplugged album with some brilliant blues, soul, country rock, and even a few Celtic rock touches. Buy the band's great "Live Cottiers Theatre, Glasgow" album and promote great blues rock [All tracks @ 320 Kbps: File size = 85.9 Mb]

TRACKS

1. New Moon Over Memphis 3:20
2. Too Late 3:59
3. I You Need Me (Just Call My Name) 3:07
4. Every Time You Smile 4:43
5. Buttercup 2:16
6. Feels Like Rain 5:22
7. Do You Know 4:02
8. Hard To Be Alone 4:14
9. Never Lose Your Faith 3:55
10. By My Friend 4:08

All songs composed by The Nimmo Brothers except "Feels Like Rain" by John Hiatt, and "Be My Friend" by Andy Fraser & Paul Rodgers

BAND

Stevie Nimmo, Alan Nimmo - Guitar, Vocals
Lindsay Coulson - Bass
Dave Raeburn - Drums
Mark "Deke" McGee - Saxophone
Fraser Spiers - Harp

ABOUT THE NIMMO BROTHERS

Over the past decade and a half, Stevie and Alan Nimmo, as The Nimmo Brothers, from Glasgow, Scotland have proved themselves to be one of the most respected exponents of modern blues the UK has seen since the blues boom of the 1960’s. Firstly in the guise of The Blackwater Blues Band with their debut album ‘Breaking out the Blues’ showcasing an incredible energy and talent in ones so young; Alan was just 19 at the time! 1998 saw the first Nimmo Brothers album ‘Moving On’ with a more varied collection of songs than their previous offering, giving an insight into the strength and power of the Nimmo Brothers arrangements yet to come. Come they did in 2001 with ‘Coming Your Way’, marking the beginning of a hugely successful relationship with Armadillo Music. This album not only captured the true spirit and energy of the Nimmo Brothers but also showed a level of song writing maturity. It was with this batch of songs that the Nimmo Brothers found themselves catapulted to the forefront of the British and European blues scenes – winning best UK blues album and best UK blues band at the 2002 British Blues Connection Awards - as well as headlining festivals and leaving sold out signs in the windows of clubs throughout the UK and Europe. 2003 was time for a change of pace and the brothers achieved this with their acoustic album ‘New Moon over Memphis’; a beautiful and highly emotional recording which focused on the vocal and song writing talents of The Nimmo Brothers. When they first showcased this new material at the Low County Blues Bash in Charleston, South Carolina they were given two consecutive standing ovations by the audience, who were genuinely moved by the power and honesty of the songs they heard. One observer was the US blues artist Debbie Davis who immediately invited the guys to join her on stage that night at her own show. In 2006, after a period where the brothers had concentrated on various solo projects, Armadillo released their ‘Live’ album; recorded in 2003, at The Cottiers Theatre, in their home town of Glasgow. The Nimmo Brothers were back with a bombardment of new killer songs, touring the ‘Live’ album with dates in the UK, Ireland and Europe. In 2009 The Nimmo’s dusted down their amps and hauled out their treasured Les Pauls and Strat’s to promote ‘Picking up the Pieces’ and once again become THE BAND to be reckoned with on the blues scene. Musically stunning, they never fail to impress audience after audience with their show. The Nimmo Brothers have recently been in Austin, Texas, recording a new CD for release in Spring 2012. Sounding stronger and more powerful than ever, The Nimmo’s played and recorded with three top Austin musicians, Bill Whitbeck, bass player with Robert Earl Keen; Jimmy Pettit, bass with Joe Ely, The Flatlanders etc; also joining them on drums, the long time Eric Clapton collaborator and band member, Jamie Oldaker. © Armadillo Music Ltd 2007 http://www.bluearmadillo.com/artistpage.php?artist=16#

21.11.11

Saiichi Sugiyama



Saiichi Sugiyama - So Am I - 2004 - Hendrixx Records

In 1975, aged 15, Saiichi Sugiyama saw an Eric Clapton concert at Tokyo's Budokan. Shortly after, while still living in Tokyo, he formed his first blues band. In 1980, he moved to Surrey, England, and is still playing the English blues circuit.

If you have a soft spot for late 60's/early 70's Brit rock, you would be bloody mad to not take a listen to the stunning bluesy, retro jams on So Am I. Born in Tokyo but having spent most of his life in England, Saiichi Sugiyama may seem like an odd candidate to champion this sound, but he clearly has a firm handle on the style. The 14 distinct tracks here cover a lot of ground, from guitar heavy electric blues and acoustic percussion-laced ballads, to anthemic rockers like "The Band Played On." The common bond they all share is breathtaking guitar work topped with intelligent narrative lyrics that take the listener on a journey that builds continuously with the chord progressions. While showcasing the guitar work without relying on solo-heavy wailers, Saiichi has put together an indelible collection of songs that is a must for any fan of the classic rock blues genre. © cdbaby.com

Talking about "So Am I", Saiichi says "I met Pete [Brown] a few years ago through David Hadley-Ray, my bass player, and he began sitting in at my gigs. We then progressed to Pete writing lyrics for my songs, and the Japanese Cream-tribute project came along. After that, we went into the studio to record an album of my original songs, a good part of which Pete wrote lyrics for. We co-produced the session and I was fortunate enough to have Clem Clemson (Coliseum) and Zoot Money (ex-New Animals) backing me, as well as Malcom Bruce and David Hadley. Henry Spinetti was booked to drum for us but the studio dates crashed with the Roger Chapman tour and he was unable to do it. Henry Lowther came in and put down some great horn parts, and Ben Matthews of Thunder, who engineered for us, also made a cameo appearance playing a double lead guitar with me. It is a songwriter’s album rather than a blues album, although there is no shortage of guitar solos. Some of the songs on the album are quite personal and it covers a whole spectrum of emotions and music styles." Quite a lot to digest on this album, which contains many musical elements. The songs are melodic with a retro flavour of late 60's/early '70s British rock played with Saiichi's Japanese sensitivity. There are balladic and anthemic rock/pop rock tracks on the album, and also good electric blues tracks with first class songwriting, and the album never sounds "cheesy" or commercial. Mostly the music is composed by Saiichi, with lyrics supplied by Pete Brown (ex-Cream). A very good album with cracking guitar throughout. Buy Saiichi's s/t 1994 album, and listen to his "SAIICHI" album [All tracks @ 160 Kbps: File size = 78.8 Mb]

TRACKS

1. Cellar Full Of Noise 4:41
2. Student Susan 5:17
3. Enough 4:35
4. Middle Of The Night 5:12
5. The Band Played On 4:56
6. Old Samurai 8:19
7. Shimmy 3:04
8. Shining Siren 4:19
9. Seagull 6:04
10. Komachi 4:52
11. I Never Turn 5:42
12. There For Me 5:32
13. The Band Played On (reprise) 1:50
14. Sweet Dreams 4:09

All songs composed by Saiichi Sugiyama & Pete Brown

MUSICIANS

Saiichi Sugiyama - Guitar, Vocals
Mark Horiuchi - Acoustic Lead Guitar, Vocals
Dave 'Clem' Clempson - Rhythm Guitar
Ben Matthews - Guitar
David Hadley-Ray - Bass Guitar
Zoot Money - Keyboards, Vocals
Malcolm Bruce - Keyboards
Simon Edgoose - Drums
Pete Brown - Percussion, Backing Vocals
Henry Lowther - Trumpet
John O’Leary - Harp
Rietta Austin, Jim Stapley, Sue Ballingall - Vocals

BIO

As a young child Saiichi was an inveterate "song inventor," singing songs he made up to amuse himself. One of his earliest memories was singing cartoon title-songs on stage with a full band behind him at a function to which he and his father were invited. Well before he took up the guitar, Saiichi wrote "radio" plays complete with soundtracks, and directed his school friends in recorded productions of them. The Beatles' music was constantly in the background then, even in Asakusa, downtown Tokyo where Saiichi was born and raised. This abiding creative activity with all that wonderful music as the background fabric of his existence was a harbinger of things to come... In 1972 when Saiichi got his first guitar at the age of 12 (a Yamaha acoustic), he was wanting to emulate the sound of Crosby Stills Nash & Young, which obviously took him a bit longer than if he was aiming at something a little more straight forward - but he says he has always followed his heart even from a young age. Saiichi straight away started making up what he later learnt to be open chords right up the neck before he mastered the lower position chords. He then befriended the late Tommy Hidaka, a member of the Tokyo group GARO who had major chart hits and were well-known for their impeccable CSN&Y covers. Tommy showed him a few more open chords and tunings and Saiichi was on his way. Saiichi then "met the blues" when he heard the track "Go Back Home" on Stephen Stills' first album, on which Eric Clapton was playing alongside Stills. Saiichi's quest for more of that "certain something" he found in that track led him to the Layla album, live Cream tracks, and finally to John Mayall's Blues Breakers album, with which the 13 year-old Saiichi found an immediate empathy. He started digging deeper into the blues, via B.B. King on Kent, Freddie King, Albert King, right on through Howlin' Wolf to Muddy Waters. Saiichi saw Clapton perform at Tokyo's Budokan in 1975 and formed his first blues band immediately after. Not satisfied playing with Japanese musicians of the day, Saiichi made plans to live abroad--England was calling. After a couple of summers spent in sunny California, Saiichi bit the musical bullet and moved to this green and pleasant (and rainy) land in 1980, home of his earliest musical influences, and decided to live in Surrey. Since then, Surrey has been his home. In 1990, Saiichi teamed up with the ex-Graham Bond Organization drummer, Paul Olsen, and the former X-Production bassist, Marco Frangos, in a power blues triumvirate known as Bluewater, playing the London blues club circuit. The Bluewater partnership with Maggie Ryder (ex-Eric Clapton), however, never went beyond the rehearsal studios as Maggie moved to New York. In 1993, after the dissolution of Bluewater, Saiichi started playing "solo" gigs backed by the ex-Walk on Fire partners, Phil Williams and Mike Casswell (of the late Cozy Powell Band fame) with Justin Hildreth (ex-Joan Armatrading) on the drums. It was with this line-up, augmented by the veteran of the British blues scene Zoot Money and the rhythm section of erstwhile Cutting Crew, that Saiichi recorded his eponymous album "SAIICHI SUGIYAMA" released in 1994. The album boasted seven of his compositions which, while firmly rooted in the blues and R&B Saiichi absorbed in his formative years, featured his unique sense of melody, particularly in the guise of "China Doll," reputed to be a closet classic for those who are appreciative of his particular style of music. The album was well received and got airplays on Jazz FM and various regional stations. His interview with BBC GLR and the appearance on Live TV alongside James Brown ensured that his gigs were packed out. His memorable jams from the nineties included appearances with the rhythm section of John Healy Band and Otis Grand as well as an evening of blues with Zoot Money. Saiichi's ever-evolving band in the 90's featured Boz Burrell (ex-Bad Company), John Cook (ex-Rory Gallagher), Terry Peak (ex-Champion Jack Dupree) and Sam Kelly (multiple-winner of the "best blues drummer in London" prize in the late nineties) among others. The last incarnation of his band featured Tim Weller and Paul Wassiff who went on to support Eric Clapton's Pilgrim US Tour as Distant Cousins. However, Saiichi was unable to get a record company backing, the typical response being "Great music but don't know how to market it" and the business side took its tool - Saiichi practically stopped gigging in 1996 - concentrating on writing just for himself. Saiichi's knowledge of vintage guitars also landed him the role of adviser to Richard Chapman, Christie's guitar consultant, in the auction sale of Clapton's guitars in 1999. This work resulted in Saiichi being comissioned to write various Clapton guitar related articles by Japanese publishers and eventually, his appointment as a consultant for the 2004 Eric Clapton Crossroads Guitar Auction at Christie's. His love of vintage Marshall amps also led him to the 1999 Ampaholics project, demonstrating the sound of various Marshall amps from the 60's on the Ampaholics CD. In 2001, Saiichi started performing on the London and Surrey circuit again with his own band, featuring new material and a new band with David Hadley-Ray, a bassist from Philadelphia, US, and Darby Todd on the drums. Saiichi first saw David play at a local blues jam when he accompanied his friend's young son, Andy Cortes, still learning to play, for moral support. Saiichi was seen gigging around Kingston and guesting on stage with his friends, John O'Leary--founder member of Savoy Brown, Gary Boner of Roadhouse, and Robin Bibi. Soon, Saiichi was rejoined by Sam Kelly on the drums, who played with him in the early '90s, and Saiichi Sugiyama and His Band was back in business. It was in 2001 through David Hadley-Ray's introduction that a collaboration which was to form the foundation of Saiichi's musical activities in the 2000s came into existence. Saiichi met and performed with the Cream lyricist, Pete Brown, at David's wife's birthday party held in the upstairs room in Paradise Bar, Kensal Rise, coincidentally the venue for the launch party for his first album on his birthday 30 Novemebr 1994. Pete began appearing at Saiichi's shows in 2002 playing percussion, singing backing vocals, and performing Cream classics with Saiichi. Through David's introduction, Saiichi also met Malcom Bruce, Jack Bruce's son, who played keyboards in Saiichi's band for a short period before his solo project took over. A Japanese record company executive happened to hear one such performance and requested Saiichi to let him include a live recording of it in his label's Cream tribute project. Instead of releasing live recording, Saiichi and Pete went into a studio with the live set-up, with Malcom on the keyboards and Darby on the drums, to cut four Cream tracks. These re-interpretations of Cream classics, produced and sang by Pete Brown (complete with the previously unreleased extra verses for Politician) were released on "Sunshine of Your Love"by Funai International/Universal Japan in December 2002. Following a spell in Tokyo after his father's death, Saiichi returned to England just before Christmas in 2002 and with Pete Brown's encouragement, started planning for and writing with him his new solo album since 1994. Pete and Saiichi assembled a team consisting of David Hadley-Ray on the bass, Zoot Money and Malcom Bruce on keyboards, Clem Clempson on rhythm guitar. Henry Spinetti, who was originally going to play the drums, was unable to attend due to the extra dates with Roger Chapman and Simon Edgoose took his place. After a week's preproduction in London, the recording session started at Chapel Studios in Lincolnshire in the spring of 2003 with Thunder's Ben Matthews engineering the session. After 10 days, the session moved to London for overdubbing horn sections, cello, flute and backing vocals. Among others, Henry Lowther played the trumpet. The session also saw Pete and Saiichi traveling to Tokyo to capture contribution from Mark Horiuchi of GARO, Saiichi's early musical influence. During the visit, Saiichi and Pete played a one-off gig in Tokyo. This was the first gig in Japan for Pete (and the first since 1978 for Saiichi) and combined with the fact that it was Mark Horiuchi's first recording in ten years, it resulted in much coverage by the local music press. The album production, which took over one year, finished in May 2004. The resulting 14 track album "So Am I" was released from Hendrixx Records in Japan on 20 July 2004 and features Saiichi's compositions and lyrics by Pete Brown. Advance orders on the album resulted in it reaching #604 on the Japanese Amazon.co.jp ranking on 27 June 2004. It received a critical acclaim from Japanese rock press, British blues publications and tracks from the album have been played on US, English, European and Japanese radio stations. In autumn of 2004, Saiichi and Pete returned to studio to cut Saiichi's re-interpretation of Beatle numbers for a Japanese project with Geoff Allen on drums, Clem Clempson on guitar, David Hadley-Ray on bass and David Munch Moore and Malcom Bruce on keyboards. The resultant four tracks were released on a compilation album "Blackbird" on Hendrixx label on 29 November 2004. Saiichi and Pete returned to Japan to play a 5 day mini-tour, starting in Hiroshima, in December to promote the "Blackbird" release. In the UK during 2004, Saiichi with his band featuring David Hadley-Ray on bass and Paddy Milner on keyboards appeared with the Yardbirds and Stan Webb's Chicken Shack. They also performed a one-off acoustic concert at the Jazz venue, Bull's Head in Barnes which was recorded for a possible release. A 6 page feature in the UK's Blues Matters! and appearing with the Yardbirds at thier Chritmas Party were a fitting conclusion of a busy year that 2004 was. 2005 kicked off with a Surrey date with Zoot Money and Pete Brown in Saiichi's band. In May, a compilation album entitled simply SAIICHI was released in UK featuring more Sugiyama-Brown tracks as well as the Beatles and Cream interpretations from the Japanese Hendrixx compilations. The release coincided with the Cream reunion concerts at the Royal Albert Hall and the album was launched at three London gigs by Saiichi Sugiyama Band featuring Pete Brown. The sell-out gig at the Hard Rock Cafe in London was packed with Cream fans visiting from all around the world. Later in the year, Saiichi started a new World Blues project with Helder Pack, the virtuoso drummer from Mozambique and his friend Mauricio Pena from Venezuela on the keyboard and a percussionist and a trumpet player. This unit with an idea to fuse Latin and African influences with Saiichi's brand of rock music eventually turned into Saiichi's new regular touring band and made its debut appearance to a packed crowd at Ealing Jazz and Blues Festival in August.2006 saw Saiichi continuing to work with his band as well as performing gigs entirely consisting of Cream numbers as a musical tribute. The idea was hatched by his friend Funky Paul Olsen, an artist, a drummer and a Cream fan. In July/August 2006, Saiichi performed in Shana Morrison Band for the 12 date UK leg of her European tour across the country. The band led by Shana, Van Morrison's daughter and an incredible blues singer in her own right, received fantastic reviews at their gigs around the country including a packed night at the Borderline in London. The tour culminated in an appearance at Summer Sundae Festival at De Montfort Hall in Leicester. After the Morrison tour, Saiichi teamed up again with Pete Brown to plan for his next projects - one involving a three way collaboration with Mark Horiuchi of GARO in Tokyo for a studio album and also Saiichi's next album consisting of his own materials. In a meanwhile, Saiichi is scheduled to perform a set of Cream music in a double-bill concert with Pete Brown's Interocetors at BoomBoom Club in September 2006. The story continues... © http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/saiichi2#

BIO (WIKI)

Saiichi Sugiyama (born 1960 in Tokyo, Japan) is a British-based guitarist, singer and composer, best known for his writing and performing collaborations with Pete Brown, the lyricist for Cream since 2002 to date. His previous bands in 1990s featured Mike Casswell and Phil Williams of Walk on Fire, Andy Smith of Hot Chocolate, Zoot Money, Boz Burrell of Bad Company, John Cook of Rory Gallagher band as well as the guitarist, Paul Wassif. Sugiyama was the lead guitarist in the band of Shana Morrison, the daughter of Van Morrison in her UK tour of 2006 and on her return to the UK in 2010. Sugiyama's studio albums in 2000s featured Clem Clempson of Colosseum, Pete Brown (who co-wrote and co-produced the albums), Zoot Money and Ben Matthews of Thunder. His British blues-based lead guitar style as well as his association with 1999 and 2004 Crossroads Centre guitar auctions at Christie's (as a guitar consultant) resulted in Sugiyama being labelled as a "Japanese Clapton" in the London blues clubs despite his remonstrations. Sugiyama plays a Gibson Les Paul guitar and Marshall amplifiers. His fluid and conversational guitar style does have a resmblance to Eric Clapton, Peter Green and has a vibrato technique similar that of Paul Kossoff whereas his singing style is of his own. Sugiyama collaborates with Mark Horiuchi, the former lead singer of the Japanese rock band Garo (Japanese rock group) who had a number of chart hits in the Japanese chart in the early 1970s and the duo recorded several tracks which were included in the album "So Am I" released in Japan in 2004. Sugiyama moved from Tokyo to England in 1980 and has lived in Surrey and London since then. He also runs his legal practice for the Japanese community in London and has one son with his English wife.