A.O.O.F.C
recommends
Mizar6

babydancing




Get this crazy baby off my head!

APOLOGIES

Sorry about not re-posting. I've an illness in my family, but I will reply to all ASAP. For the time being, my beautiful friend, Eva is helping me out. Thank you for your understanding...Paul

31.12.10

Gráinne Duffy


.

Gráinne Duffy - Out of the Dark - 2007 - Gráinne Duffy

What a powerhouse of soul and inspiration mixed with desire and passion, Grainne Duffy takes you to the most inner depths of your soul that others artists wish they could do with their music. Her debut release, 'Out Of The Dark', is an amazing album. There is nothing superficial about it. There are layers and layers of meaning and emotion here. Janis would be proud. Joining Grainne on lead guitar and vocals is the Ronnie O Flynn on bass and drums of Sharon Shannon Band and Donal Lunny, Richard Nelson on lap and pedal steel and dobro, previously of the Van Morrison Band, John Mc Cullagh on piano and the very talented Paul Sherry on rhythm guitar. For a debut outing, Grainne Duffy sounds like a seasoned veteran who's been on the scene for some time. As evident as soon as the opening, "Each and Every Time" comes on and wins you over with its passion. Then you have, "Drivin' Me Crazy" and "Good Love Had to Die", that are blues gems that will touch your heart and soul. Duffy offers up a sensual and powerful rendition of the B.B. King classic, "The Thrill Is Gone". Duffy's singing, with phrasing and intonation in order is grounded in spontaneous passion. She seizes the songs of past blues legends and makes them her own, extending her laid back rapture to contemporary material as well. Her voice is unique, her style of playing original. Grainne Duffy sets the standards for modern blues and country female vocals. An artist that is true to her music and not afraid of the hard work and commitment it all involves. Grainne Duffy is the real deal. Highly Recommended. Review by & © The Atomic Chaser © 2003 - 2010 All Access Magazine All & AccessMagazine.com All Rights Reserved http://www.allaccessmagazine.com/vol6/issue02/grainne_duffy.html

"Guitarist" magazine devoted an entire front page to the great Irish blues guitarist and vocalist, Gráinne Duffy saying that "Out of the Dark" boosts 'bluesy Americana from Ireland with genuine worldwide potential'. The magazine also said that what they love most about her is that she has a 'husky voice and plays a mean blues guitar'. "Guitar Techniques" said that 'she plays with both style and feel' and is a 'thoughtful and melodic guitarist', 'her playing is bursting with personality'. Some of Grainne's favourite artists include Keith Richards, John Mayer, Bob Dylan, and the late, great Rory Gallagher. Grainne secured three appearances at the 2008 Glastonbury Festival. She also recorded some promo trailers for BBC Television at George Martin's Air Studios in London including a cover of Oletta Adams 'Get Here if you Can'. Playing with her were Eric Clapton drummer Ian Thomas, ex Van Morrison and Madonna bassist Steve Pearce, James Hollowell on Hammond and Piano and Richard Ashcroft's sideman Adam Philips on guitar.The music was supervised by George Martin, himself. She has also played with Eric Bell of Thin Lizzy. Grainne's self-produced "Out of the Dark" is HR by A.O.O.F.C. Although Gráinne is a capable guitarist, her voice is definitely her strongest feature. She has a magnetic husky tone in her voice and sings slow intense melodies as well as great uptempo numbers, mostly self-penned and perfectly suited to the blues. Gráinne has spoken about how hard it is for many talented musicians to make a name for themselves. Speaking about TV's so called "talent" shows, she has said that "This "X Factor culture" is less about the soul of music and altogether more about the bottom line. To them it doesn’t matter about who wrote the song or what it means. Some people have lost the idea that a song is meant to come from someone, drawn from personal experiences. To these manufactured acts it is more about vocal acrobats. Sometimes it is annoying to see the type of machine that is behind them, giving them such a push. I think they are clogging the industry. It can be frustrating but the good thing is that appreciative audiences really do value it when a genuine singer/songwriter performs. We do have to work harder, but we have a more loyal audience as a result – they stay with us. For manufactured acts, the audience goes once the TV show is over.” A lot of what Grainne says is true, and she is qualified to speak about real music. When Gráinne's next album is released, please buy it and support real music. As Gráinne said, "appreciative audiences really do value it when a genuine singer/songwriter performs".

TRACKS

1 Each and Every Time 3:52
2 Drivin' Me Crazy 2:44
3 Bring It All Together 2:07
4 Bad to Worse 3:53
5 Rather Go Blind 5:36
6 I Don't Know Why 4:06
7 Good Love Had to Die 3:35
8 Meant to Break 3:41
9 Thrill Is Gone 5:47
10 Time's Not Enough 5:40
11 Out of the Dark 2:13
12 Waiting for You 2:43

All songs composed by Gráinne Duffy except "Rather Go Blind" by Billy Foster & Ellington Jordan, and "Thrill Is Gone" by Rick Darnell & Roy Hawkins

MUSICIANS

Gráinne Duffy - Lead Guitar, Vocals
Richard Nelson - Lap & Pedal Steel Guitar, Dobro
Paul Sherry - Rhythm Guitar
Ronnie O' Flynn - Bass, Drums
John McCullagh - Piano

SHORT BIO

Grainne Duffy from Castleblayney, County Monaghan, Ireland is a new voice with new songs in Blues - Rock vein. Think Bonnie Raitt (Grainne also plays a mean lead electric guitar in the band) and you'll have some idea of the power and emotion this young lady can evoke. Her debut CD, "Out Of The Dark" is a stunner! Rock/Blues guitarist and vocalist, Grainne Duffy has just began promoting her debut album ‘Out of the Dark’. Aside from receiving a degree in music in NUI, Maynooth, she also has been gigging constantly as both lead guitarist and vocalist doing session work which has seen her tour Italy, Sicily and France. All of which has lead to the development of herself as an artist writing her own material and the beginning of her solo career. This has been marked by the recording of her debut album which features ten of her original songs and two completely individual takes of the classics, The Thrill is Gone and I'd Rather Go Blind. Joining Grainne on lead guitar and vocals is Ronnie O Flynn on bass, Richard Nelson on lap and pedal steel and dobro, previously of the Van Morrison Band, Johnny McCullough on piano and the very talented Paul Sherry on rhythm guitar. Listening to her debut, it is hard not to acknowledge the many influences in her singing, guitar playing and especially her song writing such as Etta James, Bonnie Raitt, Fleetwood Mac, Peter Green, The Stones and even Bob Dylan. Currently continuing her heavy promotion of her stunning debut through radio and magazine interviews and most importantly for Grainne the heart of the whole experience; live gigs, she already has penned new material for her follow up album. This is an artist true to her music and not afraid of the hard work and dedication it all involves. Just take a listen and see for yourself what everyone is talking about! © http://www.oldflattop.com/Old%20Flattop%20Web%2009/Grainne.htm

BIO (WIKIPEDIA)

Gráinne Duffy is an Irish singer-songwriter from Castleblayney, Co. Monaghan, Ireland. All Access Magazine described her music as a "powerhouse of soul and inspiration mixed with desire and passion".Her Success has led her to play 3 days on the Acoustic Stage at Glastonbury Festival 2008, UK. and Blues On The Bay Festival 2008 in Warrenpoint, Northern Ireland, which has been twice headlined by Van Morrison. Grainne Duffy has opened for many major acts including Robben Ford, Dino Baptiste, Shawn Jones, and The Yardbirds. Her tracks have also made it on many BBC Radio Ulster playlists including Alan Simpson's Playlist, Late Show with Cherrie as well as the blog of BBC Presenter Stuart Bailie. Grainne Duffy has also been asked to record Oleta Adams' Get Here if you Can for the BBC in George Martin's renowned Air Studios in London. Previous to her solo career Grainne Duffy obtained a degree in music at NUI, Maynooth, County Kildare, Ireland and took part in session work across Italy, Sicily and France. She also toured Ireland with the band Shanco. Grainne debut album Out of the Dark was recorded with Ronnie O’Flynn who also plays with Sharon Shannon, Paul Sherry, Richard Nelson who played with Van Morrison, and John McCullagh. Grainne is currently working with Paul Charles who has managed Van Morrison , Tom Waits and Loudon Wainwright III, as well as imaj promotions who have promoted the likes of Steve Earle, John Prine and Jackson Browne in their Irish tour dates. Due to Grainne Duffy's "husky voice" her sound has been compared to Bonnie Raitt whom she lists as an influence. Other influences include Linda Rondstat, Keith Richards, Fleetwood Mac, Peter Green and Bob Dylan. Grainne Duffy will be opening for Little Feat at the Celtic Connections Festival in Scotland in February 2009 as well as opening for Paul Brady at the Ulster Hall Belfast in March 2009. Future Irish tour dates for 2008 include a solo gig in Dublins, Whelens, as well as opening for Ocean Colour Scene in Belfast . Grainne is set to make TV appearances in RTÉ Other Voices (television) on 5 December 2008 and has appeared in BBC NI Blas Ceoil broadcasted on 13 November 2008. Currently finishing tracks for her second album, as a follow up to her debut album Out of the Dark which was released last year to warm reception which included her being asked to appear for three days at Glastonbury 2008 Festival. Grainne also appeared at many of Ireland's leading festivals and was also approached by the BBC to record a track for a T.V. promotion campaign in George Martin's Air Studio in London. She has taken part in two T.V. shows for R.T.E. One of which is for the music programme Other Voices and the second is a documentary piece for the R.T.E. series Nationwide with a featured interview with Paul Charles. Her music is also featured in Belfast director and filmmaker Carol Moore's movie "Pumpgirl".

30.12.10

Split Enz


.

Split Enz - The Rootin Tootin Luton Tapes - 2007 - Warner Australasia [Fan Club Release]

Among Split Enz fans, there are no recordings as legendary as The Rootin' Tootin' Luton Sessions, the demos the band cut in 1978 just after they fired their manager, split from their record company, and had an acrimonious parting with co-founder Phil Judd. Severed from so much they knew, the Enz decided to regroup by recording in an exceedingly tiny studio in Luton. The studio just passed the definition of "studio," barely being big enough to house the band, but such close quarters produced vital, kinetic music that signaled a rebirth of the group. A fair share of that energy could be heard on the subsequent Frenzy, but the Luton sessions -- containing songs that never surfaced on a proper album -- had a unique energy and vibe unlike anything else in the Enz catalog, a quality clearly evident to the band and their fans, so the sessions became a much sought-after bootleg item, where they rightly earned the name The Rootin' Tootin' Luton Sessions. Almost 20 years after their recording, the demos finally saw an official release in 2007 when Eddie Rayner remastered the entire Enz catalog for reissue. The Rootin' Tootin' Luton Sessions appeared as part of the massive box set Enz to Enz, but also as a separately available single disc (and as double-disc limited edition to the Frenz of the Enz fanclub), allowing listeners who are not fanatics to hear some of the band's finest music. So often, rarities beloved by diehards do not translate to a wider audience, but that's certainly not the case with The Rootin' Tootin' Luton Sessions, which contain some of Split Enz's liveliest, best music, perched precisely between their proggy start and the tightly coiled new wave pop that gave them hits in the '80s. Sometimes the group does tilt a bit too heavily toward their elliptical beginnings, but the stripped-down, direct arrangements, along with the raw kinetic performances, prevent this from getting too arty. Indeed, these nervy readings give the Luton Sessions their rootin' tootin' energy, but the songs themselves are equally infectious, finding Split Enz flirting with everything from country-rock in "Evelyn" to the pounding rock & roll of "Message Boy" and the frenzied angular pop of "Miss Haps," a song that suggests the band's future. But even if portions of the sessions point the way toward what lies ahead for the Enz, The Rootin' Tootin' Luton Sessions remains a singular, compelling listen in how it acts as a fulcrum between the two eras of the Enz, producing some of the band's very best music as the group barrels ahead unadorned, unaffected, and unquestionably inspired. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/album/rootin-tootin-luton-sessions-r1266318/review

"The Rootin Tootin Luton Tapes" is a collection of demos made by the great New Zealand Alt./New Wave band Split Enz in 1978. That year the band encountered a series of problems. While in England they lost their recording contract with Chrysalis Records. Their manager and co-founder, guitarist and vocalist Phil Judd had left. (He does play on two tracks on CD 2). The band was on the dole. An opportunity arose for them to record in a small recording studio in Luton, England. Conditions were far from ideal, but with the help of a New Zealand arts grant of five thousand dollars, the band managed to lay down a number of tracks. Some of these tracks were re-recorded for the band's "Frenzy" album, but Split Enz reckoned that the original recordings were of better quality. In 2007, the band's keyboardist Eddie Rayner and Adrian Stuckey completed the remastering and remixing of many of the original 1978 tracks. The single album was released officially by Warner Music (Australia) in 2007. Many of the tracks on CD 1 & CD 2 were supposedly previously unreleased songs. However, many of the tracks had previously been released on various Australasian and Canadian releases, either as now deleted B-sides or on V.A or special issue albums. See CD 1 & 2 TRACK NOTES for info. The band's Frenz Of The Enz fan club made available a limited edition 28 track 2 CD set to its members. The extra 13 tracks on CD 2 are posted here. Given the circumstances of these recordings, the quality of the musicianship and the song material still shines through. Split Enz were a highly original alternative/New Wave band and "The Rootin Tootin Luton Tapes" is HR by A.O.O.F.C. Sound quality is far from perfect, however a lot of hard work obviously went into the remixing and remastering of these 1978 songs, and the album is genuinely worth listening to. If you are unfamiliar with this band's great talent, listen to their classic "Time And Tide" and "Mental Notes" albums

CD 1

TRACKS / COMPOSERS / TRACK NOTES

1. "Miss Haps" (Tim Finn/Eddie Rayner)
2. "Home Comforts" (Tim Finn)
3. "Animal Lover" (Eddie Rayner)
4. "Carried Away" (Neil Finn) [B-side of "I Hope I Never" (Australia)1980: Frenzy album (A&M version), 1982: Frenzy album remix/remaster, 2006
5. "Semi-Detached" # (Tim Finn) [B-side of "Things", 1979: Frenzy album (A&M version) 1982 :Spellbound album 1997: Frenzy album remix/remaster, 2006
6. "Holy Smoke" (Neil Finn) [B-side of "History Never Repeats" (New Zealand/Australia), 1981: Frenzy album (A&M version), 1982]
7. "Message Boy" (Tim Finn) [B-side of "I See Red" (New Zealand/Australia), 1978]
8. "Hypnotised" (Tim Finn) [B-side of "I Hope I Never" (Australia), 1980]
9. "Late In Rome" (aka "Serge") (Neil Finn)
10. "Straight Talk" (Tim Finn/Rob Gillies)
11. "Hollow Victory" (Tim Finn)
12. "Evelyn" (Neil Finn) [I Like It Rare 4 Frenz Of The Enz fan club-only CD, 2007]
13. "Best Friend" (Tim Finn/Neil Finn)
14. "Creature Comforts" (Tim Finn/Nigel Griggs)
15. "Remember When" (Tim Finn)

N.B: Recorded at Quest Studios, Luton, Bedfordshire, England, July 1978. Remixed & remastered by Eddie Rayner & Adrian Stuckey at Bignote Studios, Burleigh Heads, Queensland, Australia, 2006/07 except # which is the original 1978 mix

BAND

Neil Finn - guitar, piano, vocals
Nigel Griggs - bass
Tim Finn - vocals, piano
Eddie Rayner - keyboards
Malcolm Green - drums
Noel Crombie - percussion

CD 2

TRACKS / COMPOSERS / TRACK NOTES

"Hermit McDermitt" (Tim Finn) [B-side of "I See Red" (New Zealand/Australia), 1978: Frenzy album (A&M version), 1982: Spellbound album, 1997]
"Betty" (Tim Finn)
"I See Red" (Tim Finn)
"Mind Over Matter" (Tim Finn/Neil Finn) [Frenzy album (A&M version), 1982]
"Next Exit" (Tim Finn) [More Hits & Myths! NZ-only various artist album, 1981]
"She Got Body She Got Soul" (Tim Finn)
"So This Is Love" * # (Phil Judd)
"Abu Dhabi" # (Tim Finn/Eddie Rayner)
"Famous People" # (Tim Finn)
"I'm So Up" * # (Phil Judd)
"Marooned" # (Tim Finn/Eddie Rayner)
"Livin' It Up" # (Nigel Griggs) [B-side of "I See Red" (Canada), 1982: Frenzy album (A&M version), 1982]
"Frenzy" # (Tim Finn/Eddie Rayner)

N.B: Recorded at Quest Studios, Luton, Bedfordshire, England, July 1978 (except those marked * - recorded on the Dave Lee Travis Show, BBC Studios, London, January 1978) Produced by Dave Cook & Split Enz Engineered & mixed by Dave Cook Remixed & remastered by Eddie Rayner & Adrian Stuckey at Bignote Studios, Burleigh Heads, Queensland, Australia, 2006/07 (except those marked # - original 1978 mixes)

BAND

Neil Finn - guitar, piano, vocals
Phil Judd - guitar, vocals on "So This is Love" and "I'm So Up"
Nigel Griggs - bass
Tim Finn - vocals, piano
Eddie Rayner - keyboards
Malcolm Green - drums
Noel Crombie - percussion

BIO

Best known for their early-'80s new wave pop hits, particularly "I Got You," Split Enz -- after surviving a dizzying array of image and personnel changes and a full decade without any recognition outside of their homeland -- became the first New Zealand band to achieve worldwide success. Although they never reached superstar status outside of Australia and New Zealand, the band developed a strong international cult following that continued to thrive over a decade after their breakup. Split Enz's output always seemed slightly outside of the times and often frustratingly obscure, but in the end, they left behind a body of work that was always interesting and often reached pure pop brilliance. The group was founded in 1972 in Auckland, New Zealand, by Brian Timothy Finn and Phil Judd. Initially, the band was a light acoustic combo called Split Ends consisting of Judd (guitar, vocals), Finn (vocals, piano), Miles Golding (violin), Mike Howard (flute), and Mike Chunn (bass). Finn and Judd were the main songwriting force of the band's early years. Judd drew his inspiration from a wild variety of often non-musical sources while Finn's tastes leaned toward the British pop of the Beatles, the Kinks, and the Move. In a creative rush that lasted several months, the two bashed out songs on acoustic guitars -- Judd working out the basic song with lyrics and Finn providing the melodies. Miles Golding came from a classical background and pushed the band into complex, neo-classical structures and arrangements. The result was an eclectic mix of styles that was quite original though not very commercial. After months of rehearsals, the group went into the studio to record their first single, "For You"/"Split Ends," in February of 1973. After the single was released, the band launched a small tour; upon its completion, Golding left the group to study in London. At Chunn's urging, the band went for a new, electric sound, adding Geoff Chunn on drums, Wally Wilkinson on guitar, and saxophonist Rob Gillies, who was only a part-time member. After the new lineup was in place, Judd refused to tour, claiming their music was too complex for stage presentation; he stayed behind to write and record new material while the rest of the band toured, although he would later rejoin the live lineup. The group made an appearance on the televised New Zealand talent contest New Faces -- though they finished second to last, it gave them some crucial early exposure. In 1974, former Space Waltz keyboardist Tony (Eddie) Rayner was added to the band and they changed their name to Split Enz. Following the name change, the group embarked on a series of radio-sponsored "Buck-a-Head" shows -- rather than play the more traditional pub circuit, they played theaters, which seemed more suited to the band's style. The group's shows took on a theatrical tone, as the bandmembers wore wild, colorful costumes and sported a variety of odd hairdos. Finn acted as master of ceremonies, giving odd spoken soliloquies. Judd made the occasional appearances as did costume designer and spoons soloist Noel Crombie. By the fall of 1974, Crombie was added as a full-time member on percussion. Before the tour was completed, Geoff Chunn was replaced by Paul Crowther and Rob Gillies left the group. In March of 1975, the group traveled to Australia -- at this time, all members except Judd switched to using their middle names. Mistakenly billed as "New Zealand's raunchiest rock & roll band," the band struggled for nine months but they eventually earned a small cult following and secured a contract with Mushroom Records. Their debut album, Mental Notes, was recorded in two weeks. While their inexperience in the studio combined with an unsympathetic producer led to a less than satisfying result in the band's eyes, the album encapsulated the band at its artiest and most ambitious. The album made a brief appearance on both the Australian and New Zealand charts. By November of 1975 Wilkinson was fired and Gillies rejoined. Split Enz had caught the attention of Roxy Music's Phil Manzanera, who offered to help the band with their next album; they arranged to meet him in England to redo Mental Notes. Before leaving, they recorded a new single, "Late Last Night." Despite the complex song structure, the single showed the band moving toward a pop direction; nevertheless, it failed to have much impact. "Late Last Night" was accompanied by a video clip, which was an uncommon practice in 1976; the band would continue to make conceptual clips from that point on. In April of 1976, Split Enz joined up with Manzanera in England and signed to Chrysalis for worldwide distribution. While the recordings went well, they found it impossible to secure live work in Britain without an agent. The band rehearsed constantly, although the songwriting partnership of Judd and Finn had dried up and no new songs were being written. Second Thoughts, essentially a reworked Mental Notes, was released toward the end of 1976 (it was released internationally as Mental Notes). Before the band supported the album with a U.S. tour in early 1977, Crowther was replaced on drums by Mal Green. Judd, fed up with uninterested audiences and the demands of promotion, left the band during the tour and Chunn left two months later. The band returned to England to regroup -- they replaced Judd with Tim's younger brother Neil and recruited bassist Nigel Griggs. Tim Finn assumed leadership of the new incarnation of Split Enz and the group began to move away from its arty, theatrical tendencies on their next LP, 1977's Dizrhythmia. In Australia, the album went gold and the single "My Mistake" became their first Top 20 hit. In England, the group fared far worse. In the wake of the punk explosion, Split Enz seemed slightly out of touch. Though their odd looks and new, leaner material wasn't so far removed from post-punk styles, their earlier reputation seemed more in line with the progressive rock the punks sought to destroy. However, they did manage to keep a small cult following within the U.K. By early 1978, Split Enz had been dropped by Chrysalis and, unable to get gigs, they were forced to go on the dole. They continued writing new material at a feverish pace and rehearsing constantly. Gillies was fired and Judd rejoined but he found himself unable to fit into the new direction of the band and left the group shortly thereafter; he later found limited success as the leader of the Swingers and as a solo artist. The New Zealand Arts Council came to the band's aid with a 5,000-dollar grant. A studio in Luton was booked and the band knocked off 28 songs in under five days. These sessions, known as the "Rootin' Tootin' Luton Tapes," displayed a newfound edge and considerable commercial potential. Around the same time, they recorded a new single with producer David Tickle -- a straight-ahead rocker called "I See Red" -- which charted respectably in Australia. Split Enz returned to Australia to make their next album, 1978's Frenzy, re-recording many songs from the Luton tapes. However, the final product paled in comparison to the demos -- the high energy of the original tapes simply wasn't captured and many of the best songs were left on the demos. Many of the Luton recordings would later resurface on the A&M version of Frenzy, released in North America in 1981. The band teamed up again with David Tickle for their next album, True Colours, in 1979. The album lacked the excesses of their previous albums and showcased their new pure pop direction. With Neil Finn's seductive "I Got You," the band finally broke through -- the single and album hit number one in Australia and New Zealand, with the album eventually selling 200,000 albums in Australia, the equivalent of one in every ten homes in that country. The success led to an international deal with A&M Records. True Colours performed well in the U.K. and the U.S. and went platinum in Canada. The band quickly recorded a follow-up during a mid-year break in touring. The result -- called Corroboree in Australia and Waiata internationally -- was released in April of 1981. The record was somewhat disappointing, seeming to follow the same formula as its predecessor but with decidedly lesser material. The album failed to match the success of True Colours, but it did manage two hit singles, "One Step Ahead" and "History Never Repeats." On their subsequent North American tour, Split Enz were billed equally with Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers, which stands as a testament to the band's growing popularity. Mal Green left the band to work on solo projects and Crombie took over on drums. By late 1981, after many months of intensive touring, the band retreated to the studio to record their most personal and creatively satisfying album to date, Time and Tide. Released in 1982, it immediately topped the Australian and New Zealand charts. The advent of MTV and the channel's commitment to new wave acts helped the band's growing cult status in America -- both "Dirty Creature" and "Six Months in a Leaky Boat" (as well as earlier videos) saw heavy airplay on the channel -- but the album failed to see much chart action. Early in 1983, Tim took a break from Split Enz to work on a solo album, Escapade. The album was a big success in Australasia, spawning several hits singles including the Top Ten "Fraction Too Much Friction." For all of its success, though, the album distracted Tim, delaying the follow-up to Time and Tide and effectively ending the momentum Split Enz had built over the previous three albums. Conflicting Emotions was finally finished by the fall of 1983. Prior to this album, Tim had been the primary contributor, but for this effort, he was overshadowed by brother Neil who had written a considerable majority of songs for the first time. The album, while predictably successful in Australia/New Zealand, saw a delayed release in the States and failed to make much impact. A new drummer, Paul Hester, was added, demoting Crombie to percussion. Before work was begun on the next album, Tim announced that he was leaving the band. With Neil Finn as the leader, the band carried on for one more album -- 1984's See Ya Round, an uneven album that was released only in Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. Neil decided to fold the band following a farewell tour, Enz with a Bang!, for which Tim rejoined the group. Neil and Paul Hester went on to form the internationally successful Crowded House, Tim continued a sporadic solo career, joining Crowded House for the Woodface album in 1991. Nigel Griggs, Noel Crombie, and Phil Judd formed Schnell Fenster, releasing two albums before disbanding and Eddie Rayner has done session work and formed his own combo, the Makers. Tim and Neil Finn reunited for a Finn Brothers album in 1995. Split Enz remains an institution in their homeland, occassionally playing reunion gigs. In 1996, the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra performed a symphonic tribute to Split Enz under the direction of Eddie Rayner with contributions from both Tim and Neil Finn as well as other New Zealand artists including Dave Dobbyn. The resulting album, ENZSO, spent several weeks in the Australian and New Zealand Top Ten. A second ENZSO project, ENZSO 2, followed in 1999. The classic Enz lineup reunited for a New Year's Eve millennium gig in New Zealand. In 2005 the band was inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame and the True Colours-era lineup reunited again for a brief but highly successful Australian tour in 2006. © Chris Woodstra © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/artist/split-enz-p5501/biography

Wild T & The Spirit


.

Wild T & The Spirit - Fender Bender - 2008 - Jazzhaus Records

Toronto guitar master and Trinidadian born Tony Springer has been referred to as "Canada's Hendrix." He has played with one of David Bowie’s touring bands, and has been cited as one of the late, great Jeff Healey’s major influences.“Tony and his band, Wild T & The Spirit had some commercial 1990's hits including "I’ve Got the Rhythm," “Midnight Blues,” “Loveland” and“Freedom Train". "Fender Bender" is the band's sixth album, and is less "commercial" and more in the real blues rock style than some of his previous work. Tony Springer has stated that "blues stuff is easier to write, it’s the other stuff that’s kind of hard. We are still getting the odd gig for that. They’ll pay us a bunch of money and we’d do it. I’d be Whitney Houston if they wanted me to be. It’s all about entertainment. It’s about doing what puts a smile on their faces.” "Fender Bender" is nothing like Whitney Houston, but it is great blues rock with tremendous guitar and keyboard work and great jamming. Try and listen to Wild T's "I've Got The Rhythm" and "True Bliss" albums

TRACKS

Let's Go
The Best That I Can
Secrets
Life Goes On
My Next Ex-Wife
Finders Keepers
Buried Alive
I'll Play The Blues For You
Why Why Why
Keepin' It Real
The Hard Way
Twilight Zone
Now & Zen

All songs composed by Tony Springer and/or Guenther Kapelle except "My Next Ex-Wife" by Rick Estrin (Little Charlie & The Nite Cats), and ‘I’ll Play The Blues For You’ by Jerry Beach

MUSICIANS

Tony "Wild T" Springer - Guitars, Lead & Background Vocals
Guenther Kapelle - Basses, Background Vocals
Herve Bassett - Hammond Organ & Fender Rhodes Piano
Enzo Lapadula - Hammond Organ
Steve Koven - Piano
Chris Lesso - Drums
Al Lee Bahba - Tambourine, Cow Bells
John Bouvette - Background Vocals

REVIEWS

It didn't take long at all for Wild T & The Spirit's newest CD "Fender Bender" to quickly become one of my favorite discs, so far in 2008. It's gut wrenching infusion of hard driving blues rock guitar is just what the doctor called for and is just the right medicine to cure all those of you out there suffering from lack/of/psychedelic/blues/rockitus, a condition that there really hasn't been a cure for since Jimi Hendrix left the scene. Don't try to compare Wild T & The Spirit with anyone else out there, especially in Canada, as he is truly in a special league all his own, as he gets down and dirty with his guitar and leaves all other pretenders in the dust. "Fender Bender" is not for the faint of heart. It ain't your back porch sing - a - long and it ain't your daddy's Chevrolet, what it is though is some of the most gripping blues/rock guitar I can guarantee many of you haven't heard in years, if not decades. In fact the best way to listen to "Fender Bender", is to get yourself into a dark quiet room, throw on the headphones, slap on the seatbelt and prepare to take a ride, because once you get started listening to Wild T & The Spirit, you ain't going to want to stop. "Fender Bender" is my Top Ten Canadian Released CD for 2008, so far. Review by & © John Vermilyea (Blues Underground Network) December 12, 2008

Tony Springer has been a mainstay of the club scene here for many years now and it’s a pleasure to welcome a fine new album. Many of our players do better in Europe than they do here and this disc’s German origins are testimony to that phenomenon. However it got here, you should get one. It’s the bluesiest effort yet from the man many wanted to portray Jimi Hendrix on film. (The fact that Tony is right-handed is an obstacle, of course.) There are several Hendrix-inspired songs here, but there are also fine versions of Rick Estrin’s “My Next Ex-Wife” and of the Albert King hit, “I’ll Play The Blues for You”. Of the originals, from the opening instrumental, “Let’s Go”, to the power ballads “Life Goes On” and “Finders Keepers”, to the new blues “Keepin’ It Real” to the ambitious, eight-minute “Twilight Zone”, there’s much to enjoy here for Tony’s fans, new fans and fans of string bending, Fender or otherwise. Wild T is well supported throughout by Guenther Kapelle on bass and Chris Lesso on drums. Three keyboard players help out on various songs, Herve Bassett, Enzo Lapadula and Steve Koven. Mr. Kapelle also supplied a song, “The Hard Way” and co-produced. The recorded sound is of demonstration quality. The release party was at Jeff Healey’s Roadhouse on February 2nd, but if you don’t see this in time you can still go to www.wildt.ca. It’s an attractive, full service web site. Review by & © John Valenteyn, jvalenteyn8724@rogers.com John Blues Picks http://www.torontobluessociety.com/0802johnspicks.htm

Wild T & the Spirit have been receiving rave reviews from fans & press all over the world for their stellar musicianship blended with a dynamic live show. Wild T & the Spirit released their CD "Fender Bender" on Germany 's Jazzhaus Records last year. The album covers the whole spectrum with blistering guitar ripping' blues rock, soulful melodies and psychedelic super jams a la Jimi Hendrix, an artist that Springer has emulated on many occasions both in guitar dexterity and appearance. The late Jeff Healey used to say "I followed him around like he was the Messiah... Tony has been my idol for years”. Also, when David Bowie hand picks you to be his guitar player from a glimpse of a Wild T & the Spirit video, you just might be recognized as a top player. © 2006-2009 Blues-Finland.com / BluesWebzine.com

Wild T & The Spirit come as something of a pleasant surprise. For having expected some over-cooked post Hendrix fare, 'Fender Bender' offers a surprising depth of variety to the material as well as some fine singing and above all a real band album topped by Tony 'Wild T' Springer's excellent guitar playing. There is of course a core Hendrix vibe to the whole project, but it's the way 'Wild T' searches out new ways to lend expression to his playing that is impressive. In many respects the title of the album 'Fender Bender' is a tad misleading. For while guitar fans will enjoy the various inspired guitar workouts, there are enough strong songs here to set the band ahead of most of their contemporaries. The story of 'Wild T' is that of a Trinidadian native Tony Springer who has made a name for himself in his adopted Canada and who aside from being championed by Jeff Healey now finds himself signed to the prestigious German Jazzhaus label. Throw in recorded appearances for the likes of Davis Bowie and you quickly realise this is a guitarist of some substance. But perhaps the biggest accolade that can be extended to this album is that 'Wild T' stamps his own personality on proceedings. 'Fender Bender' is nicely topped and tailed by impressive two guitar led instrumentals and the remaining eleven tracks consist of strong self penned songs and well chosen covers. Of the original material there's an undoubted Hendrix feel to 'The Best I Can Do' - complete with a sinewy guitar solo and plenty of wah wah - and there's an acoustic guitar/piano break down and a strong melody line on the impressive 'Life Goes On'. 'T' then goes on to explore some low down blues on 'Finders Keepers'. Perhaps the two contrasting ends of his expansive style are best exemplified by the juxtaposition of the lovely mellifluous groove of 'Keepin' It Real' with the altogether brasher psychedelic wah wah of 'The Hard Way'. Musically the latter comes close to the muscular playing of Eric Gales and is one of the few occasions on which 'T' slips into lyrical cliché, as in 'drinking whisky on the bad part of town'. 'T' also adds some Albert King style licks on a cover of 'I'll Play The Blues For You' and the band works up a fine groove on Rick Estrin's humorous and well chosen 'My Next Ex-Wife'. Overall the material is strong and refreshing and the band is anchored by the well marshalled rhythm section of Guenther Kapolei on sumptuous bass and the deft touch of Chris Lesso on drums. 'Fender Bender' is a good album and for those of you as yet unaware of Wild T & The Spirit', a fine introduction to a cracking band. Review by & © Pete Feenstra READY TO ROCK... - Neston, Cheshire, UK [from http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=2375297261]

An apt title and name as this contains some heavy, high-energy blues-rock with guitar playing by Wild T that frequently does border on the wild. On this CD he works chiefly in a power trio format – there are some guest keyboards players but they are very much in supporting roles – and the overall sound is sometimes similar to Jimi Hendrix, sometimes to Led Zeppelin, and sometimes very original. The songs are indeed almost all Wild T or bass player Guenther Kapelle compositions or collaborations except for covers of ‘I’ll Play The Blues For You’ (most often associated with Albert King) and Little Charlie & The Nite Cats’ Rick Estrin’s pointed ‘My Next Ex-Wife’. It is also good to see a little humour creeping in: ‘The Pink Panther Theme’ crops up on the tour-de-force ‘Twilight Zone’. Tony Springer a.k.a. Wild T is a dread-locked Trinidadian raised in Canada who was inspired to take up the guitar after hearing Steve Howe from progressive rock superstars Yes. Hardly the stereotypical background for a powerhouse blues-rocker but listen carefully and you will hear slight traces of jazz, funk and even reggae, giving this a little different twist from the norm. Very interesting indeed. Review by & © Norman Darwen BLUES & ART JOURNAL Mar/Apr 2008 - Vienna, Austria

BIO

''Wild T & The Spirit' (fronted by guitarist Tony 'Wild T' Springer), is a powerful blues-rock jam band based in Toronto, Canada. The band has released 5 Cd's and is currently touring all over Canada and Europe. The band has built up a strong & loyal fan base of musicians and music loving fans over the years with it's powerful live show! Jeff Healey said, "I followed him around like he was the Messiah...Tony has been my idol for years!" Strong songwriting and musicianship has made 'Wild T &the Spirit' a very in demand act! Originally, the band came together in 1990 with guitarist Tony 'Wild T' Springer, drummer Danny Bilan and bassist Nazem Lakay. The band was signed to Warner Music Canada and released 2 albums (Love Crazy 1991,Givin' Blood 1993). "Givin Blood" was nominated for best hard rock album at the 1994 JUNO (Canada's Grammy) awards. In 1993, 'Wild T & the Spirit' was also hand picked to perform on a 14 city tour across Canada opening for Bon Jovi on the "Keep The Faith Tour". During this time, guitarist Springer was also asked to tour & record with David Bowie. "A absolute delight to work with...a lyrical, lilting take on Hendrix" says David Bowie. A Springer appears on the CD "Back Tie, White Noise" and performed with Bowie in concert all over the US. After the tour with David Bowie, Tony continued to tour Canada & US with his band. However, frustrated with the lack of effort by his record company at the time, Tony decided not to renew his contract. Tony then left for Chicago, USA where he continued gigging as a sideman with many great blues bands. For a short time, he also had a Chicago based version of 'Wild T & the Spirit' that toured throughout the mid-west & Texas. One of the highlights during this period, was opening up a string of concerts for "Deep Purple" in places like Detroit, Chicago & New York City. But, like all great blues songs, there were a few disappointments in the "Windy City", so Tony returned to Toronto and by late 2002, the band 'Wild T & the Spirit' was reformed by Springer and bassist Guenther Kapelle. (Kapelle had spent many years gigging and recording in the Los Angeles music scene and had toured all over Canada, USA and Europe with 'The Blazers' and other top acts). With addition of drummer Brian Lass and veteran Toronto keyboardist Peter Nunn, the group recorded the CD "True Bliss", which was released in Canada, USA and Europe by Bullseye/Taxim Records in 2004. "Wild T Springer is building a reputation for himself as the next premier guitarist to emerge from the Canadian music scene!" says Tom Richards of the Michigan Blues Society about the "True Bliss" CD. The band then began a relentless tour schedule of Canada and Europe with drummer Andre Tellier and keyboardist Robert Angelow, playing in all sorts of venues and at some of the largest festivals. This kept the band touring throughout 2004 & 2005. A compilation CD of the first two 'Wild T & the Spirit' albums called "I've Got The Rhythm" was released in 2005. In August 2005, drummer Boris "The Russian Rocket" Andranov joined the band just in time for their 2 month, 7 country, European tour. This also included a stop at the BBC studios in London, England to perform live on "Paul Jones Blues Show" on BBC Radio 1. But in March 2006, the band made a few changes by recruited powerhouse Toronto drummer Chris Lesso and returned to the power trio format minus the keyboards. The band kept touring and ended up up on some of same stages with Jeff Healey, "Canned Heat", Roger Hodgson of "Supertramp", Mick Taylor of "The Rolling Stones" & Joe Bonamassa to name a few. This line up of Springer, Kapelle and Lesso is the best yet, and have been receiving rave reviews from fans & press all over. The combination of blistering guitar blues-rock, stellar musicianship, soulfulmelodies and psychedelic super jams, have made their fans in North America and Europe go crazy for there live concerts! Tony Springer - Tony "Wild T" Springer has hung with the best of them. David Bowie, Jeff Healey, Bon Jovi, Deep Purple, Jay Leno, David Letterman and Arsenio Hall are just some of the musical acts and personalities that have been blown away by Wild T's guitar. Wild T is originally from Tunapuna, Trinidad. Though one may find similarities to Jimi Hendrix, ironically it was T's first exposure to Steve Howe and classic Yes that inspired him to take up guitar. Moving to Toronto, Canada, T quickly gained a reputation on the local club circuit. Since then he has recorded two albums (Love Crazy 1991 and Givin' Blood 1995) with his own group, Wild T and the Spirit for Warner Brothers. He has also recorded an album (Black Tie, White Noise) with David Bowie and has appeared with Bowie on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Late Night with David Letterman and the Arsenio Hall Show. He has toured with Bon Jovi and Deep Purple throughout North America and has performed thousands of club shows. In '99 he was asked to portray Jimi Hendrix in Daydream Believers - The Monkees Story because of his resemblance and showmanship. Guenther Kapelle - Guenther Kapelle is originally from Kelowna, BC, where he grew up in a musical family. He has been playing the bass for over 20 years. He has recorded and performed with blues artists Jimmy O and Code Blue. Chris Lesso - Chris began to study music on the piano at the age of 7, and received his Grade 8 in classical piano through the Royal Conservatory at age 12. He began drumming at 9, and has never looked back. After gaining much experience performing & writing in various bands in the local scene, he sought out and took lessons from many world-renowned artists such as Dom Famularo, Ed Shaughnessy, Jim Chapin and Jim Blackely. Chris’s unique blend of hard rock, jazz, improvisation and world flavored rhythms can now be heard in ‘Wild T & the Spirit’ live show, as well as his own original instrumental band ‘The Factor’, which performs regularly in the Toronto area. © http://www.bluesundergroundnetwork.com/Wild_T_&_The_Spirit_CD.html

29.12.10

Electromagnets


.

Electromagnets - Electromagnets with Eric Johnson - 1975 - EGM

Electromagnets are best known as the launching ground for Eric Johnson, one of the great guitarists of the '80s and '90s. Johnson was known for his clear tones and amazing technical skill -- two things that are apparent on the Electromagnets' first and only album. The group followed the path of such trailblazing fusion groups as the Mahavishnu Orchestra, creating an amalgam of rock, jazz, blues and the avant-garde. Unlike many of their peers, the Electromagnets were loose, letting themselves bend the beat and have fun. As a result, their album is more enjoyable than most '70s fusion records -- even when they venture into prog clichés, or when vocalist Chris Geppert becomes overbearing, their musicianship pulls them through. And of those musicians, Johnson stands out with his crystal clear guitar and tasteful solos. His presence makes Electromagnets the curiosity it is, but also makes it more than an odd historical item. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/album/electromagnets-r61493
With his long time friend, keyboard player Stephen Barber, the late Drummer Bill Maddox from Abilene, Texas formed Electromagnets, the great '70's fusion band from Austin, Texas, in Austin, in 1973. Bill also played with the Eric Johnson Group, Alien Love Child and Omar and the Howlers. Bill had replaced Chris Layton in Grady in 2006, but left in 2007 due to heart problems. “There are a lot of very good drummers out there, but when you see a great one, you know it. Bill Maddox was a great drummer" said Musicmakers owner David Baldry, who grew up in Abilene with a closely knit group that included Stephen Barber, Eric Johnson, Kyle Brock, Johnny Dee and Austin City Limits Live general manager Tim Neece. When Chris Maresh played bass with Bill Maddox in the bluesy Alien Love Child band, he said “Bill was like Mitch Mitchell of the Jimi Hendrix Experience. He brought so much energy to the band." Bill Maddox also played guitar and collected vintage Fender guitars. Band manager Joe Priesnitz said that in his earlier career, Bill had a severe alcohol and drugs problem, but had overcome his addictions and helped many people with similar problems. In 1974, guitarist Eric Johnson joined the Electromagnets.The band played fusion in much the same style as bands like Jeff Beck, Return to Forever, and Weather Report. Keyboardist Steve Barber and bassist Kyle Brock are serious powerhouse musicians. The late Frank Zappa who admired the band, called them “a Mahavishnu with a sense of humor.” If you like classic ’70s jazz rock/fusion give this album a listen. Try and listen to the "Electromagnets II" album, and Eric Johnson's superb "Tones" album

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1 Hawaiian Punch - Eric Johnson, Stephen Barber 6:00
2 Motion - Eric Johnson 4:45
3 Dry Ice - Bill Maddox 5:05
4 Blackhole - Kyle Brock 6:51
5 Salem - Stephen Barber 4:30
6 Minus Mufflers - Bill Maddox 7:36
7 Nova Scotia - Kyle Brock 3:38
8 Crusades - Stephen Barber 8:01
9 Hawaiian Punch (Live) Bonus Track- Eric Johnson, Stephen Barber 8:14
10 Dry Ice (Live) Bonus Track - Bill Maddox 7:40

Recorded at Odyssey Sound Ltd., Austin, Texas, during July and September 1974. The bonus tracks 9 & 10 were recorded at Memorial Hall, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, on November 16th 1975.

.

MUSICIANS

Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar - Eric Johnson
Bass Guitar - Kyle Brock
Electric Piano, Piano, Clavinet, Synthesizer, Vocals - Stephen Barber
Drums, Percussion - Bill Maddox R.I.P
Percussion, Other [Carrot And Egg] - John Treanor on "Minus Mufflers"
Saxophone - Tomas Ramirez on "Minus Mufflers"
Vocals - Chris Geppert on "Motion"

.

ERIC JOHNSON BIO

Austin, Texas is seen as one of the up and coming music scenes in the United States. It has a reputation for being the fertile ground for artsy musicians to perfect their craft and gain recognition for their work. It even hosts the famous South by Southwest music festival every year, which allows new, independent artists the opportunity to showcase their style. Before Austin even started gaining its reputation for great music, Eric Johnson was 16 years old, and rocking the socks off of audiences with his amazing guitar skills. Eric Johnson's journey from humble Austin, TX to becoming a true guitar hero has not been easy. Eric is an admitted perfectionist about his music. He has been called obsessive about his album recordings and guitar equipment. In some regards, this has greatly contributed to his musical excellence, and sometimes stalled his progress toward his ultimate career goals. Through it all, Eric has persevered with patience, continues to rock crowds of guitar enthusiasts, and is heralded by Guitar Player Magazine as being “one of the most respected guitarists on the planet”. Eric Johnson was born on August 17, 1954 into a musically inclined family in Austin, Texas. His father enjoyed singing and encouraged his children to pursue musical interests. Eric and his sisters studied piano very early on, and then Eric switched to guitar lessons. He acknowledges Eric Clapton, Cream, Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan, Jerry Reed, and Chet Atkins among other artists who contributed great influences to his style as he learned the guitar. By the time Eric was 16, he was the lead guitarist in a band called Mariani, which rocked Austin, Texas and he started to make a name for himself. Eric did record some music with his first band, which is now considered a valuable collector's item. When Eric graduated from high school he dabbled in a few different endeavors including a year at the University of Texas at Austin and traveling to Africa with his family. However, he realized that being in Austin and making music was where he really wanted to be. In 1975 he joined up with his second band, the Electromagnets, a fusion group. His three years with the group earned him some great experience and a loyal fan base in the Austin area. Unfortunately, the Electromagnets were never able to get a recording contract with a legitimate music label and broke up. Despite the end of the Electromagnets, Eric kept making music. He began working with a couple members of the defunct group under the new name of the Eric Johnson Trio. Eric didn't just play guitar with the Electromagnets, he also sang. Eric's vocals are impressive to this day, but are commonly overlooked in favor of his string-bending guitar skills. With his new group, Eric was able to tour more and record his first album, entitled Seven Worlds. As was the case with many future projects of Eric's, Seven Worlds got caught up in legal issues and mis-management and was not released until twenty years later. This is one of the first examples of Eric Johnson's perseverance and patience with his musical career. Seven Worlds would not be the first or last of Eric's projects to get entangled in red tape and legal nonsense. Even though his first album got stalled out and his career suffered for a few years, Eric kept working to perfect his sound and his craft. He contributed to recordings by several well-known artists including Christopher Cross, Cat Stevens and Carole King. He also continued his work in the local Austin, TX scene and gained an excellent reputation for mind-blowing live performances, but was not able to translate his success into an album or national recognition for many years. Finally, in 1984 Eric caught a break when Prince saw a clip of his live performance. Prince was an extremely popular and influential artist at the time, and with the help of Christopher Cross, got Eric signed to the Warner Brothers record label. In 1986, Eric released Tones, which was his first legitimate album created with the backing of a major record label. The album earned Eric some media recognition as well as a Best Rock Instrumental Performance Grammy nomination for the song “Zap”. However, it did not sell as well as everyone hoped, so Warner Brothers let Eric go, and he signed with a smaller, independent record label. True to form, Eric did not let the disappointment of losing his Warner Brothers contract keep him from creating music and continuing to work at improving his guitar skills. Big success was right around the corner after the apparent setback of being released from Warner Brothers. Eric's next album Ah Via Musicom brought him the biggest accolades of his career. The now famous track “Cliffs of Dover” won him a Grammy for Best Rock Instrumental Performance in 1990. By this time, Eric was considered a guitar legend. The Ah Via Musicom album went platinum and Eric got all kinds of hype in the guitar press for his impressive accomplishments. Eric entered into a period where he toured to promote Ah Via Musicom and worked toward perfecting his next album release. Apparently, his perfectionism was in high gear during the recording of his follow-up album. A few other factors including side projects and personal issues contributed to the six year wait for Eric's next album, Venus Isle, which was finally released in 1996. Although the album clearly demonstrated that Eric had made great strides in his musical style and abilities, it did not get great reviews or sales. It was one more tough blow to Eric's career, because he had worked on the album for so long and was the producer, songwriter, arranger, and vocalist for the album in addition to his guitar skills. Eric was subsequently dropped from his record label for the second time in his career. During the time Eric was working to put out Venus Isle, he also started a side project called Alien Love Child. The group received a great response from fans and eventually put out a live performance album called Live and Beyond. It is rumored that the Alien Love Child project helped Eric to work through some of his perfectionism and obsessing over his music. Since the album was recorded live, Eric was forced to accept and embrace a few flaws in the performance and found the experience very freeing. Despite the disappointment of the Venus Isle album, Eric did not give up his musical aspirations. He found success rather quickly while touring with other well-known guitarists Steve Vai and Joe Satriani. In 1996 the trio toured together and recorded an album entitled G3: Live in Concert, which went platinum. In 1998, more than twenty years after he originally recorded it, Seven Worlds was released to the public. Fans were intrigued to notice that Johnson's style was already developed on this very first album. His next album, Souvenir, was released in 2002. Souvenir gave fans a unique perspective on Eric's studio recording process. After a nine-year production period, Eric released Bloom in 2005. Fortunately, most of his fans are patient, but he received a lot of criticism for taking so very long to release Bloom. Eric simply attributes the long wait to being busy with other projects. When the album was finally done, Eric's fans enjoyed the diversity of sounds and the more emotional, improvised style of his music. Even though he hadn't quite let go of his perfectionist, technical ways, his music was beginning to show a more light-hearted side of his untouchable guitar greatness. Eric began contributing to musical theater productions in 2006 and continues to work on various live productions and a new studio album. The word on the street says don't hold your breath waiting for his next album release, but when it does come out, you will not be disappointed. Through the personal setbacks, disappointing album sales, accomplishments and awards, Eric Johnson has remained strong and patient. He has received criticism for being too much of a technical musician and not playing with his heart. However, these comments do not bother Eric. He is proud of his technical mastery of the guitar and sees himself fulfilling a different role in the guitar world. He continues to work toward creating a more authentic sound every day. Any aspiring guitarist who wishes to match Eric's mastery needs to develop a commitment to the technical aspects of making music, as well as musical equipment. Eric's advice to developing guitarists is to become very comfortable with the fretboard. He says you have to start out slowly and develop your “ear theory” before you worry about the “book theory” of playing guitar. Learn to recognize intervals and notes all along the guitar fretboard and you will start to work toward all he has accomplished. Eric Johnson is an official guitar hero. Even though he is in his 50's now, his music still appeals to a younger generation. His Grammy winning recording for “Cliffs of Dover” is featured on the Guitar Hero video game series. As Austin, TX gains more of a reputation for creating great music and guitar superstars, Eric Johnson will be remembered as one of the grandfathers of the Austin scene. His sound will never get old, however, as his commitment to keep working slowly but surely to improve his sound and keep his craft relevant to future generations of guitar fans never waivers. © 2007-2008 Mad Guitar Licks http://www.madguitarlicks.com/eric-johnson.html

28.12.10

Can


.

Can - Can - 1978 - Harvest, EMI Electrola GmbH

The final studio effort from the first decade run of Can signifies not only a changing of the guard for the progressive Krautrock icons, but a nod to the shifting tastes of the times. Losing the great bassist Holger Czukay as a bandmember who moved into the production/editing room had a telling effect, but his replacement Rosko Gee was more than adequate. Percussionist Rebop and Gee (both coming off stints with Traffic) buoyed the band and modified Can's sound as they collectively continued exploring amplified and processed experimentation. Electric guitarist Michael Karoli continued expanding his horizons and sound palate, Irmin Schmidt dug deeper into keyboard sounds running parallel to fellow countrymen from the bands Passport, Cluster and Kraftwerk, while Jaki Liebezeit, simply put, remained one of the more consistent and steady rock drummers of the era. But disco beats, on the way out in 1979, remained a part of Can's appeal, and a precursor for the acid-jazz dance music to come. At their best "All Gates Open" whips space blues harmonica, buried vocals, and Robert Fripp inspired guitar into a clean and simple jam. The exotic influence of African music infused into the instrumental "Sunday Jam" suggests strains of the famous jazz standard "Caravan." The purely electric "Sodom" resonates along the lines of Cluster welded to Jimi Hendrix style inferences while also plodding. A campy take of the can can "Ethnological Forger Series #99" parallels the Love Sculpture/Dave Edmunds adaptation of "Sabre Dance." Of the more dance oriented tracks, "A Spectacle" is relevant from a contemporary standpoint with Karoli's spiky, choppy wah wah sound, while "Safe" is completely spaced out. A scintillating attempt at R&B fusion, "Can Be" veers into epic big hair arena corpo-rock territory, held together by Karoli's excellent playing. While Can emerged in ensuing years with different lineups and further sub-developments, this last vestige of the initial band holds firm in resolve, and is at the least an intriguing aside to their more potent earlier albums. © Michael G. Nastos © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/album/can-r3226/review

An album of sheer creative brilliance from the legendary Can, and HR by A.O.O.F.C. Even without bassist Holger Czukay and the incredible vocalist, Damo Suzuki, there is no mistaking Can's unique sound on this album. Three of Can's albums, "Monster Movie", "Tago Mago", and "Ege Bamyasi" are progressive rock classics. Give at least one a listen. You may become hooked on this amazing band's unique sound. It is also worth hearing Irmin Schmidt's "Masters of Confusion" album, Holger Czukay's "Rome Remains Rome" album, and the Damo Suzuki Band's V.E.R.N.I.S.S.A.G.E album

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

A1 All Gates Open - Karoli,Schmidt,Liebezeit,Gee,Reebop 8:16
A2 Safe - Karoli,Schmidt,Liebezeit,Gee,Reebop 8:36
A3 Sunday Jam - Karoli,Schmidt,Liebezeit,Gee 4:17

B1 Sodom - Karoli,Schmidt,Liebezeit 5:42
B2 A Spectacle - Karoli,Schmidt,Liebezeit,Gee,Czukay 5:48
B3 E.F.S. Nr. 99 ("Can Can") - Karoli,Schmidt,Liebezeit, J. Offenbach 3:16
B4 Ping Pong - Karoli,Schmidt 0:25 *
B5 Can Be - Karoli,Schmidt,Liebezeit 3:00

* On the original 1978 vinyl lp side 2 sticker, tracks B3 & B4 are reversed. On the album sleeve, the track sequence is listed as above
N.B: The original 1978 first vinyl pressing of this album was released as "Can". Later vinyl and CD reissues were entitled "Inner Space" after the name of the studio where the album was recorded

BAND

Guitar, Vocals, (Bass on "Can Be") - Michael Karoli
Bass - Rosko Gee
Keyboards, Synthesizer - Irmin Schmidt
Drums - Jaki Liebezeit
Percussion - Reebop Kwaku Baah

BIO

Always at least three steps ahead of contemporary popular music, Can were the leading avant-garde rock group of the '70s. From their very beginning, their music didn't conform to any commonly held notions about rock & roll -- not even those of the countercultures. Inspired more by 20th century classical music than Chuck Berry, their closest contemporaries were Frank Zappa or possibly the Velvet Underground. Yet their music was more serious and inaccessible than either of those artists. Instead of recording tight pop songs or satire, Can experimented with noise, synthesizers, nontraditional music, cut-and-paste techniques, and, most importantly, electronic music; each album marked a significant step forward from the previous album, investigating new territories that other rock bands weren't interested in exploring. Throughout their career, Can's lineup was fluid, featuring several different vocalists over the years; the core bandmembers remained keyboardist Irmin Schmidt, drummer Jaki Leibezeit, guitarist Michael Karoli, and bassist Holger Czukay. During the '70s, they were extremely prolific, recording as many as three albums a year at the height of their career. Apart from a surprise U.K. Top 30 hit in 1978 -- "I Want More" -- they were never much more than a cult band; even critics had a hard time appreciating their music. Can debuted in 1969 with the primitive, bracing Monster Movie, the only full-length effort to feature American-born vocalist Malcolm Mooney. 1970's Soundtracks, a collection of film music, introduced Japanese singer Kenji "Damo" Suzuki, and featured "Mother Sky," one of the group's best-known compositions. With 1971's two-record set Tago Mago, Can hit their visionary stride, shedding the constraints of pop forms and structures to explore long improvisations, angular rhythms, and experimental textures. 1972's Ege Bamayasi refined the approach, and incorporated an increasingly jazz-like sensibility into the mix; Future Days, recorded the following year as Suzuki's swan song, traveled even further afield into minimalist, almost ambient territory. With 1974's Soon Over Babaluma, Can returned to more complicated and abrasive ground, introducing dub rhythms as well as Karoli's shrieking violin. 1976's Unlimited Edition and 1977's Saw Delight proved equally restless, and drew on a wide range of ethnic musics. When the band split in 1978 following the success of the album Flow Motion and the hit "I Want More," they left behind a body of work that has proven surprisingly groundbreaking; echoes of Can's music can be heard in Public Image Limited, the Fall, and Einstürzende Neubauten, among others. As with much aggressive and challenging experimental music, Can's music can be difficult to appreciate, yet their albums offer some of the best experimental rock ever recorded. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/artist/can-p3826/biography

Johnny Winter


.


Johnny Winter - Live Johnny Winter And - 1971 - Columbia

In its time, this was an enormously popular live album, especially among high-school kids just starting to discover blues-rock in the early '70s. Derived from live performances at the Fillmore East and at Pirate's World in Dania, FL, it is probably, in fairness, the best representation of Johnny Winter's sound from his prime years that one is likely to find -- the pity is that it's only about 40 minutes long, and is weighted very heavily toward Winter's covers of well-known rock & roll numbers. Considering that it was recorded along a tour promoting the Johnny Winter And album, one would expect that the band would have done a considerable number of tracks from that record, none of which are represented here. The highlights are of considerable value, however, including a searing rendition of the Stones' "Jumpin' Jack Flash" sandwiched between some much older repertory ("Great Balls of Fire," "Long Tall Sally," "Johnny B. Goode," etc.). Except for the opener, "Good Morning Little School Girl," on which Winter and the band try to show how many notes they can hit as quickly as they can, the players generally try for something a little more subtle and interesting, and one wishes that more of what they did had used the slow blues groove they settle into on "It's My Own Fault." Their version of "Great Balls of Fire" has some of that, mostly by default (no one did the song faster than Jerry Lee Lewis anyway), and also enough energy so one doesn't even "miss" the piano one usually expects somewhere in the song; "Long Tall Sally," by contrast, kicks in on overdrive and takes off from there. But for all of the musical virtues (and obvious joy) that Winter and company bring to those standards, the most interesting cuts here are "It's My Own Fault" and Winter's own "Mean Town Blues," and one wishes that there were more such tracks here. In that regard, it might be worthwhile for someone at Sony/Legacy to do a serious vault search and see if there are surviving tapes of any other numbers recorded from the two shows (and was it just two?) that were recorded for this album. © Bruce Eder © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/album/live-johnny-winter-and-r22058/review
Recorded live at Bill Graham's Fillmore East and Pirate's World, Dania, Florida, this is terrific early '70's blues rock from the great Johnny Winter and his band which includes Rick Derringer on guitar and vocals. This album is VHR by A.O.O.F.C. Johnny remains one of the preeminent white bluesmen of his generation. It's a pity the album is so short, but there is a double LP album "And And Live" available which contains both albums "Johnny Winter And" and "Live Johnny Winter And." Check out http://www.yee.ch/winter/winter_bio.html for info on Johnny's early career. Listen to Johnny Winter's classic 1969, "The Progressive Blues Experiment" album. Later albums like "Third Degree" and "Guitar Slinger" are all great examples of Johnny Winters talent. Check out Johnny Winter's "A Rock n' Roll Collection" @ JWINT/AR&RCOLL and his "Live In NYC '97" album @ JWINT/LIVENYC97

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1."Good Morning Little School Girl" - Sonny Boy Williamson 4:35
2."It's My Own Fault" - John Lee Hooker, B.B. King, Jules Taub 12:14
3."Jumpin' Jack Flash" - Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 4:26
4."Rock And Roll Medley" - 6:46
a."Great Balls Of Fire" - Otis Blackwell, Jack Hammer
b."Long Tall Sally" - Robert "Bumps" Blackwell, Enotris Johnson, Richard Penniman (aka Little Richard)
c."Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" - Dave "Curlee" Williams, James Faye "Roy" Hall
5."Mean Town Blues" - Johnny Winter 8:59
6."Johnny B. Goode" - Chuck Berry 3:22

BAND

Johnny Winter - Vocals, Guitar, Harmonica
Rick Derringer - Vocals, Guitar
Randy Jo Hobbs - Vocals, Bass
Bobby Caldwell - Drums, Percussion

REVIEWS

The band (And) were miraculous live. The sight of taill, spectral milk white Winter bounding across the stage to tower over the dark, stocky little Derringer, defiantly blowing hot licks and slick tricks right back at him, is one of the definitive images of the rock and roll concertm and the beautiful blistering sound track of those gigs can be heard on: Johnny Winter And Live. For my money Johnny Winter is the finest working white blues guitarist (an outrageous claim but not indefensible. - New Musical Express 15-Jul-1972:

Without doubt a true live classic. Recorded in 1971, mainly at the legendary Fillmore East, the Texan bluesrock albino presents himself from his best side. Tender and bitter blues stands against tough rock 'n' roll remakes like "Great Balls Of Fire", "Long Tall Sally" or "Johnny B. Goode". Despite occasional disharmonies the virtuose guitar fights between Winter and Rick Derringer seek for ones of same birth. In intensity, "Jumpin' Jack Flash" is far beyond the Rolling Stones original recording. - ME/SOUNDS 9/93: *****

Johnny Winter And: Live (Columbia 30475, 1971)-If Jimi Hendrix is the definitive interpreter of Bob Dylan ("All Along the Watch Tower," "Like A Rolling Stone"), then Johnny Winter is the definitive interpreter of the Rolling Stones. "Jumpin' Jack Flash" is as final a statement in Rock Music as can be hoped for. Add a corrosive "Johnny B. Goode" to the mix and the listener is transported to some Hard Rock Nirvana where Britney Spears and N'Cync are no where to be found. Oh, did I mention Winter could sing the blues? © http://www.yee.ch/winter/Disco2/winter_disco2_andlive.html
Johnny Winter and Live: Wow!!! What a hell of a live performance!! Johnny's slide and lead playing on his gem really pushes Rick Derringer to have to play his ass off! From the opening track of "Good Morning little School Girl", you these guys mean serious business up on the stage, at that time! Their version of Jumpin' Jack Flash" makes me forget who really wrote this song (nothing personal Mick and Keith). They tend to take this classic to the next level, which most artist can't even come close to doing in their lifetime! The first track on side two, Rock and Roll Melody: Great Balls of Fire, Long Tall Sally, into A Whole Lot of Shakin' Going On is nothing to be reckon' with! Again Johnny has Rick pushed to a blistering edge, when he does his solo on "Great Balls of Fire"!!! Also what's amazing is all the lushful playing Johnny does behind Rick to really compliment his! The whole band brings the end of this amazing R&R Melody to a "full tilt peak" at the end of "Whole Lot of Shakin' Going On"!!! You can really hear the crowd's response to this classic performance afterwards as well (Damn!! I wish I was there!!)! "Mean Town Blues" is quite a follow up to the R&R Melody, you talk about Johnny's blues playing and singing, it's all there in this track. I once heard Buddy Guy mentioned he was the blues, well nothing personal Buddy, but I think Johnny deserves that under his belt! To me, Johnny is "truly the blues"! Why? He's really lived a hard blues life, plays and sings it like he's going to die the next moment, and is presently in a state of very ill health and condition, while all these other cats like Buddy Guy and BB King are reaping their rewards of digging in dirt to finally enjoy their gold mine they currently have and are well enjoying. Ok, enough of the side line talk, and I want to finish up with the last track "Johnny B. Goode", a great track and performance to end this classic live album with! The only thing I have to say is, I wish it was a double album with more juicy songs from the tour they did that year!!! © Daniel Larsen http://www.yee.ch/winter/Disco2/winter_disco2_andlive.html

SHORT BIO

Blues guitarist Johnny Winter became a major star in the late '60s and early '70s. Since that time he's confirmed his reputation in the blues by working with Muddy Waters and continuing to play in the style, despite musical fashion. Born in Beaumont, TX, Winter formed his first band at 14 with his brother Edgar in Beaumont, and spent his youth in recording studios cutting regional singles and in bars playing the blues. His discovery on a national level came via an article in Rolling Stone in 1968, which led to a management contract with New York club owner Steve Paul and a record deal with Columbia. His debut album (there are numerous albums of juvenilia), Johnny Winter, reached the charts in 1969. Starting out with a trio, Winter later formed a band with former members of the McCoys, including second guitarist Rick Derringer. It was called Johnny Winter And. He achieved a sales peak in 1971 with the gold-selling Live/Johnny Winter And. He returned in 1973 with Still Alive and Well, his highest-charting album. His albums became more overtly blues-oriented in the late '70s and he also produced several albums for Muddy Waters. In the '80s he switched to the blues label Alligator for three albums, and has since recorded for the labels MCA and Pointblank/Virgin. The early-2000s were quiet as far as new Winter recordings, but there were a number of significant reissues. Alligator issued the best of their years with the artist as Deluxe Edition in 2001, Columbia/Legacy covered his 1969-1971 period with their 2002 release Best of Johnny Winter, and Fuel 2000 came up with Winter's earliest recordings and compiled them on 2003's Winter Essentials 1960-1967. Sony reissued Winter's 1969 self-titled album with five bonus tracks in 2004, the same year the man returned with his first new album in nearly eight years, I'm a Bluesman. The archival reissues continued with Fuel's Introduction to Johnny Winter in 2006, which collected sides Winter recorded in his pre-Columbia years between 1960 and 1967 for the Dart, KCRO, Frolic, Todd, Hall-Way, and Pacemaker imprints. © William Ruhlmann, allmusic.com


.

BIO (WIKIPEDIA)

John Dawson "Johnny" Winter II, (b. February 23, 1944), Beaumont, TX, United States is an American blues guitarist, singer and producer. Johnny and Edgar Winter were nurtured at an early age by their parents in their musical pursuits. Johnny Winter is known for his southern blues and rock and roll style, as well as his physical appearance. Both he and his brother were born with albinism. Johnny Winter first began performing at an early age with his younger brother, Edgar Winter. Johnny's very first TV appearance was on a local childrens television show that aired in Houston and Beaumont markets called the Don Mahoney and Jeana Claire show. Don Mahoney was a blind singing cowboy/kiddie show host in the Houston area for many years. Jeana Claire was his sidekick and a former Louisiana Hayride backing vocalist. Their show ran in one form or another on Houston television from the early fifties, on into the late '80's (including reruns on Access Cable). Johnny and Edgar appeared on Mahoney's show when they were about ten years old, playing ukelele and singing. Unfortunately, archival footage of the Winter brothers appearance was destroyed; while Don did save some kinescopes of his shows from the fifties, Johnny and Edgar's duo was not one of them. His recording career began at the age of 15, when their band Johnny and the Jammers released "School Day Blues" on a Houston record label. During this same period, he was able to see performances by classic blues artists such as Muddy Waters, B. B. King and Bobby Bland. In 1968, Winter began playing in a trio with bassist Tommy Shannon and drummer Uncle John Turner. An article in Rolling Stone Magazine, written by Larry Sepulvado helped generate interest in the group. The album Johnny Winter was released near the end of that year. The following year they performed at numerous rock festivals including Woodstock. Contrary to urban legend, however, Johnny did not perform with Jimi Hendrix and Jim Morrison on the infamous Hendrix bootleg recording "Woke up this Morning and Found Myself Dead" from New York City's Scene Club. In his own words, "...I never even met Jim Morrison! There's a whole album of Jimi and Jim and I'm supposedly on the album but I don't think I am `cause I never met Jim Morrison in my life! I'm sure I never, never played with Jim Morrison at all! I don't know how that [rumour] got started." Winter struggled with a heroin addiction in the early part of his career. After eventually recovering from the addiction, in 1973, he returned to the music scene in classic form with Still Alive and Well, a song written by Rick Derringer saluting Winter for overcoming his addiction. In live performances, Winter often tells the story about how, as a child, he dreamed of playing with the blues guitarist Muddy Waters. In 1977, he accomplished this goal and produced the Muddy Waters album Hard Again. In 1978, he experienced continued success with the production of Waters' I'm Ready. He followed this in 1980, by producing Muddy's final effort, the album King Bee. Their partnership produced a number of Grammy Award-winning recordings throughout, and he recorded the album Nothing but the Blues with members from Muddy Waters' band. There are quite a few Johnny Winter albums that are considered "non-official." A majority of these albums were produced by Roy Ames, owner of Home Cooking Records/Clarity Music Publishing. According to an article from the Houston Press , Johnny Winter left town for the express purpose of getting away from him. Ames died on August 14, 2003 of natural causes at age 66. As Ames left no obvious heirs, the ownership rights of the Ames master recordings remains unclear.As Johnny stated in an interview when the subject of Roy Ames came up, "This guy has screwed so many people it makes me mad to even talk about him."In a recent interview,Winter explained his current approach to music: "Most of the stuff I do is fairly old," he says, which befits the lifelong bluesman. But don't expect to hear "Rock 'n' Roll Hoochie Koo", (even though that was one of his signature songs back in the day). On this tour, Winter says firmly, "we're not playing any rock and roll at all." Despite experiencing several health crises in recent years, rendering him incapable of performing without being seated, Winter still tours regularly. Sitting down, the venerated musician concentrates on blues numbers and eschews his rock hits. Fans at an August 23, 2008 show in Bowling Green, Kentucky were therefore surprised when he covered not only blues songs such as Jimi Hendrix's "Red House" and Ray Charles' "Blackjack", but also two popular rock and roll songs: the Rolling Stones' "It's All Over Now", and Bob Dylan's "Highway 61 Revisited". Winter produced two Grammy Award-winning albums by Muddy Waters, Hard Again and I'm Ready. At least three of his own albums were also nominated for Grammy awards. He was one of the many acts to perform at the Woodstock Festival, playing a nine song set that featured his brother Edgar Winter, on two of the songs. He was on the cover of the first Guitar World in 1980. In 1988, he was inducted into the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame. The Smashing Pumpkins paid homage to Winter by recording an instrumental song titled "Tribute to Johnny", in which they try to emulate Winter's unique sound. The song was originally intended for their highly acclaimed 1995 album Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness but was rejected and eventually turned as b-side on their Zero single and also was included in their box-set The Aeroplane Flies High.

26.12.10

Dr. Wu' and Friends


.

Dr. Wu' and Friends - Texas Blues Project, Vol. 1 - 2007 - Dr. Wu'

A great collection of hard driving Texas blues featuring many great musicians who started their careers playing in Fort Worth blues night clubs. Check out Dr. Wu's "Reunion" album

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1 I Don't Need No Woman Like You - Ashworth, Freeze 4:01
2 Stop Your Lyin' - Ashworth, Freeze 4:13
3 Jacksboro Highway - Carter, Ellsworth, Nicholson, Wilson 5:36
4 I Don't Care Blues - Ashworth, Freeze 4:09
5 Sister Blue - Ashworth, Bassham, Freeze, Owen 4:19
6 I Wanna' Love You - Ashworth, Freeze 3:53
7 When I Get to Heaven - Ashworth, Bassham, Freeze, Owen 4:41
8 The Fool Around - Ashworth, Freeze 3:19
9 Storm Watch Warning - Ashworth, Bassham, Freeze 7:46
10 Come Back Baby - Ashworth, Freeze 3:17
11 High Maintenance Baby - Ashworth, Bassham, Freeze 4:06
12 Nothin' Like Texas Blues - Ashworth, Bassham, Freeze, Owen 5:06

BIO / MUSICIANS

DR. WU’ “…the good in me …the good in you” Band mates JIM ASHWORTH and BRYAN FREEZE formed Dr. Wu’ in 2002 after growing up and playing in various bands starting in the late 60’s. The name was taken from a favorite Steely Dan song that encourages us to live life to the fullest and strive to be the very best that we can be. With this as their goal, they set out to record their “Texas Blues” Project Volume I “Fort Worth Artists”… a long overdue recorded history utilizing guest appearances by musicians who have made Fort Worth a global mecca of top players… especially great “guitar slingers”.
The first being BUDDY WHITTINGTON , a multi-talented guitarist and singer with an endless bag of guitar licks, sounds, and tricks that are always refreshing and are inspiring. Buddy is a permanent member of blues legend, John Mayall’s BLUESBREAKERS band. Buddy lends his talent to three tracks on the CD, including a live version of the popular Gary Nicholson song… “JACKSBORO HIGHWAY” an infamous strip on the Northside of Fort Worth which in the 50’s and 60’s was lined with nightclubs like THE SKYLINER BALLROOM where under aged teens could get in to see their blues heroes like Jimmy Reed, Ray Sharpe, Delbert McClinton and countless others on any given Saturday night.
After a chance meeting at The 6th Street Bar & Grill, a local Fort Worth blues venue, long time friend STEPHEN BRUTON instantly agreed to add his creativity to a track. Stephen, a “star” in his own rite, has been a player early on with the likes of Kris Kristofferson, Delbert McClinton, Bonnie Raitt, and countless other greats.
Home-grown JAMES PENNEBAKER added his tracks from his home studio in Nashville due to his busy schedule and much sought after talent as a guitar, fiddle, and pedal steel master. James has been a member of the Delbert McClinton, Leroy Parnell and more recently….Big & Rich bands. James is now the Artist Representative for FENDER GUITARS, NASHVILLE.
Hammond B-3 master, “RED YOUNG" lends his “classic” B-3 sound on two tracks, teaming up with Stephen Bruton on “Come Back Baby” and guitarist Danny Hubbard on the Charlie Bassham scorcher, “Storm Watch Warning.” “Red” is currently on the road with Eric Burden and the “Animals” and has also toured with Linda Rondstadt, Sonny and Cher, Joan Armatrading, Tanya Tucker, Delbert, and is the front man for his own band, the ever popular…. RED and the RED HOTS.
Long time friend CHARLIE BASSHAM, original drummer for THE ATOMIC CLOCK and LEE PICKENS GROUP was enlisted as the third member of DR. WU’ after it was apparent that he was the “voice” that was needed to give the “TEXAS BLUES” PROJECT that special magic that would push the project to new levels of “BLUESDOM”.
The core element of DR. WU’ music is is established with the help of MIKE KENNEDY on drums (early on with FREDDY KING), DANNY HUBBARD on guitar, and GRAMMY nominated bassist, JERRY HANCOCK …collectively, the popular FORT WORTH group, “THE SIDEMEN.”
Other GREAT musicians who added their individual talents to the project inlude:
“MOUSE MAYES” guitarist for BLACK OAK ARKANSAS and POINT BLANK in the 80’s and later THE VOODOO KINGS…more recently teams up with BUDDY WHITTINGTON when not on tour with JOHN MAYALL.
LEE PICKENS of “D.O.A.” and BLOODROCK fame, adds his licks on two tracks
“ROLLO” SMITH laid down a tasty traditional slide guitar on “I DON’T CARE BLUES”
BOBBY COUNTS…..Fort Worth’s “OFFICIAL BLUES AMBASSADOR” and bassist extraordinaire contributes on two tracks and…..
RANDY CATES the bass man on the popular “LIVE” version of “JACKSBORO HIGHWAY”
GARY “OWA” OWEN …an original member of The LEE PICKENS GROUP…plays his vintage ‘66 Fender Precision bass on two tracks including the theme song of the album…NOTHIN’ LIKE TEXAS BLUES
RUSTY BODEN , an original member of THE LEE PICKENS GROUP and THE PARTY CRASHERS plays KEYS on two cuts
Drummer DANNY COCHRAN “Fort Worth Shuffles” his way on “HIGH MAINTENANCE BABY”
MICHAEL HAMILTON grooves on the keyboards along with THE SIDEMEN on “JACKSBORO HIGHWAY"
RODNEY BOWENS of PROFESSOR D fame, blows sax on the new dance craze… “THE FOOL AROUND”
YOLANDA WALKER sings soulful backup on “ STOP YOUR LYIN’ ”
…and Last but not least….. “THE WORLDS GREATEST BLUES HARMONICA PLAYER"…. GARY GRAMMER plays on three..
Quite the collection of “World Class Musicians” to come from FORT WORTH and be featured on The first Volume of “TEXAS BLUES” PROJECT ! * * * * * ©2006-2010 OurStage, Inc http://www.ourstage.com/epk/bluesmusic

John Stewart


.

John Stewart - Cannons In The Rain - 1973 - RCA

After recording a pair of records each for Capitol and Warner Bros., John Stewart moved over to RCA, where he remained a bit longer. Issued in 1973, Cannons was released just about the time the outlaw movement was cracking it in Austin with Willie Nelson, Jerry Jeff Walker, Waylon Jennings, Billy Joe Shaver, Guy Clark, Townes Van Zandt, Kris Kristofferson, and the rest. Stewart's music could not have sounded more out of place with the Texans. This was California country music that had been drenched in Stewart's folk influences and his love of West Coast production. To that end, Nick Venet, who had produced his records at Capitol, returned to Stewart's side. He enlisted some of old friends such as banjo boss Bobby Thompson, drummer Russ Kunkel, harmonicat Charlie McCoy, pianist Hargus "Pig" Robbins, and backing vocalist Buffy Ford. Some of the newer faces are what make the difference, however, and these include Pete Drake on pedal steel and dobro, the Nashville Edition on backing vocals, and guitarists Waddy Wachtel and Kelso Herston. The laid-back feel of the disc is a Venet trademark, but Stewart's in fine voice and lyrical form. The loopy melody of "Easy Money" that straddles the line between soft rock and honky tonk is an example as is the forlorn folky country of "Chilly Winds." "Road Away" is Southern California country at its finest. The title cut with its tender chorus and gentle melody line is gorgeous here but would have been better served if cut by Marty Robbins or even Conway Twitty. This is like Jimmy Webb without the acid. "Lady and the Outlaw" is a nod to what was happening in Austin despite its high-on-weed spoken word intro. But here it is, Stewart rolling out a tune that could have been written by Jerry Jeff and sung by either Steve Young or Waylon. It's a hell of a way to close an album and makes the listener long for an entire record of tunes like this -- which came with Wingless Angels the very next year. © Thom Jurek © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/album/cannons-in-the-rain-r97137/review

Even if you are not a fan of "country" or folk music, this album is worth listening to for the songwriting quality of the late San Diegan singer/songwriter John Stewart. Listen to his "California Bloodlines" and "Bombs Away Dream Babies" albums

TRACKS

1."Durango" – 2:51
2."Chilly Winds" – 3:35
3."Easy Money" – 3:23
4."Anna On A Memory" – 3:02
5."All Time Woman" – 3:15
6."Road Away" – 3:10
7."Armstrong" – 2:35
8."Spirit" – 3:54
9."Wind Dies Down" – 3:31
10."Cannons In The Rain" – 3:20
11."Lady And The Outlaw" – 3:29

All songs composed by John Stewart except "Chilly Winds" by John Stewart, & John Phillips

MUSICIANS

John Stewart - (Guitar), (Vocals)
John "Bucky" Wilkin, Chip Young - (Guitar), (Background Vocals)
Waddy Wachtel, Kelso Herston - (Guitar)
Fred Carter, Jr.- (Dobro), (Guitar)
Pete Drake - (Dobro), (Steel Guitar)
Arnie Moore - (Bass), (Guitar), (Vocals)
Chris Darrow - (Dobro), (Mandolin), (Violin)
Bobby Thompson - (Banjo)
Hargus "Pig" Robbins - (Organ), (Piano)
Buddy Herman - (Drums)
Farrell Morris - (Percussion), (Conga), (Marimba), (Vibraphone)
Charlie McCoy - (Harmonica), (Marimba), (Background Vocals)
Bergen White - (Vocals), (Background Vocals)
Buffy Ford, Linda Hargrove, The Nashville Edition - (Background Vocals)
Marvin D Snyder - Shotgun

BIO

John Stewart first gained recognition as a songwriter when his songs were recorded by the Kingston Trio. In 1960, he formed the Cumberland Three, which recorded three albums for Roulette. The following year, he joined the Kingston Trio, replacing Dave Guard, and stayed with them until 1967. His song "Daydream Believer" was a number one hit for the Monkees at the end of that year. Stewart traveled with Senator Robert Kennedy on his 1968 presidential campaign, an experience that affected him deeply. In 1969, he released his classic album California Bloodlines, the first of seven solo albums to reach the charts through 1980. Stewart found his biggest commercial success with the Top Ten album Bombs Away Dream Babies and its single "Gold" in 1979. He released several of his albums and albums by others on his own Homecoming label starting in the 1980s. Airdream Believer appeared on Shanachie in 1995, followed by The American Folk Song Anthology on Delta in 1996. Rough Sketches and the live Bandera were released in 1997 and 1998, respectively, by Folk Era. Stewart signed with Appleseed Recordings in 2000, and his next three albums, Wires from the Bunker (2000), Havana (2003), and The Day the River Sang (2006), all appeared on the Appleseed imprint. Following Stewart's death on January 19, 2008, in San Diego, CA, Folk Era released a previously unheard live set (recorded at the Celebrity Theatre in Phoenix, AZ, on November 30, 1973) as Bite My Foot in 2009. © William Ruhlmann, © 2010 Answers Corporation http://www.answers.com/topic/john-stewart