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15.1.09

One Hand Free



One Hand Free - Quadraphonic - 2008 -Thundertrauzer Enterprises

"It’s hard not to be captivated by One Hand Free’s funky, grind rock delivery on their latest album Quadraphonic. Biting guitar licks, swirling keyboards, a tight rhythm section and some kickin’ vocals is what the band delivers, and they deliver it as good as any." © Metronome Magazine

A great hard/Southern rock album from the New England based One Hand Free. You may not be familiar with the name, but OHF have, for the last decade been playing to global audiences, and have a wide fan base.They have shared stages with Eddie Money, The J. Geils Band, and members of the Allman Brothers. Some music critics have compared OHF's music to The Black Crowes, Government Mule, Free, Deep Purple, and even Otis Redding, and Al Green. Their music is mainly a style of Southern hard rock 'n' roll, but they also incorporate funk, soul, and R&B into their music. One critique compared some of their playing in part to Steely Dan. The Boston Globe ran an article stating that"One Hand Free rattles the skeletons of Grand Funk Railroad and Mountain." "Quadraphonic" is a well played and constructed album, shows originality, and demonstrates a talent way above your average rock bamd. Check out their s/t album.

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1 King by Now - Blowen, Bowe, DiJoseph, Taylor
2 Majesty - Blowen, Bowe, DiJoseph, Taylor
3 Heavy Hands - Blowen
4 Lucky - DiJoseph
5 Dig - Blowen, Bowe, DiJoseph, Taylor
6 Badway - Blowen, Bowe, DiJoseph, Taylor
7 Hard Times - Blowen, DiJoseph
8 Stumble - Blowen

BAND

Andrew Blowen (lead vocals, Hammond organ, electric piano, synth.)
Josh DiJoseph (guitars)
Geoff Taylor (bass)
Kelly Bower (drums)

REVIEWS

"Most of the songs on Quadraphonic are fast-paced and upbeat, but a couple of tracks, most notably “Lucky” and “Stumble,” slow down to enter different dimensions of sonic emotion. “Badway” brings out a funkier edge, reflecting the band members’ admiration for genres slightly outside the rock realm. Blowen’s lyrics match the mood of each song, at times expressing glory and, at others, adversity." © The Wire

Rock and roll. They sweat it, pump it, grind it, grunt it, strut it, flaunt it, beg it, whisper it, shout it, believe it, and preach it. When One Hand Free lay hands on their instruments, they manifest all the glory and all the grime inherent in the magic of authentic home grown, hand rolled, original Rock and Roll. Remember Rock and Roll? When undistilled and uncleaved, Rock and Roll is the most intoxicating blend of roots and influences known to man. One Hand Free's brand is original and hand crafted, at it's full potency. To Rock is truth: the raw power to penetrate and communicate needn't be obscured by genre or made safe by classification. You know it when you hear it.To Roll is pure: the pursuit of the sublime fears no inhibition of hard or soft, easy or complex. You know it when you feel it. To say that One Hand Free play Rock and Roll is to oversimplify. One Hand Free ARE Rock and Roll. They sweat it, pump it, grind it, grunt it, strut it, flaunt it, beg it, whisper it, shout it, believe it, and preach it. They do what it takes to bring true Rock and Roll to a world vastly in need. "Quadraphonic", released January 2008 through Thundertrauzer Enterprises, is a major step forward in achieving One Hand Free's goal of returning Rock and Roll to it's visceral, yet sanctified throne atop the pantheon of authentically interactive entertainment. The audience is ensured a broad audio pallet with which to work by virtue of an adventurous mix helmed by Joel Hamilton (Tom Waits, Mike Patton, Soulive, Dub Trio) and skillfully transmitted by Grammy winning mastering engineer Jay Frigoletto ( War, Fu Manchu, Alice In Chains, Rhino Records). Conjuring in equal parts the cerebral curiosity of Emerson, Lake and Palmer, the bawdy and elemental bottom line of early Aerosmith, and the brute force of Mountain, the scope of the record stimulates notions of both the gutter and the grandiose. The band, consisting of Andrew Blowen (Vocals/Keyboards), Geoff Taylor (Bass), Josh DiJoseph (Guitar/Engineering), and Kelly Bower (Drums), crafted the album in the spirit of The Band and Stevie Wonder: amidst hot solder, rejuvenated Hammond organs, and piles of vinyl in their personal audio play pen known as "The Mood Tube". They found their determination not to settle for the paint by numbers aesthetic of typical studio logistics spurred on by a cathartic swell of support among European rock revival audiences, sparked by press coverage in the Dutch magazine "Aktueel". The sessions, a year long odyssey of Steely Dan - esque lab work and Government Mule - like hotbox live takes, were the culmination of lessons gleaned and peaks glimpsed touring the Northeast in support of the band's self titled first album, released in 2004 by Austin, TX label Halt Music Company. The immediacy and intimacy of One Hand Free's live performances, on stages such as Nectar's, Harper's Ferry, The Stone Church, and The Casino Ballroom, with acts as varied as Eddie Money, members of the Allman Brothers Band, and Godsmack, are evident in the collection of 8 songs that sear their value into the head, heart, and hips. The title, "Quadraphonic", is a nod to One Hand Free's belief that its members are but four facets of a sharp and gleaming sonic stone, as well as a multi layered reference meant to summon spirits of a time when Rock and Roll albums were unified, and unifying works of both art and energy, a synergy of creativity and commerce, and a breeding ground of communication and connection. One Hand Free bear the standard of today’s Rock and Roll renaissance. "Quadraphonic" conveys their action plan. Bassist Geoff Taylor relates the band ethos, "Know when to be simple, know when to be smart, and never be afraid to hit just the right sweet spot. They might not be aware that they need it, but somewhere deep down, you KNOW that they do". Peel back the two sides of your brain and receive what One Hand Free brings to bear, a hot slab of unrepentant Rock and Roll. Right between the ears. © http://cdbaby.com

It has been almost four years since Portsmouth rock ’n’ rollers One Hand Free released a new album. The group’s self-titled 2004 release established the band as an assemblage of classic rock purists, determined to deliver the type of 1960s and ’70s style rock that inspired them to take up their instruments. The latest disc, released on the record label ThunderTrauzer, cranks up the volume of the band’s musical mission. Officially due out in January, “Quadraphonic” features eight original tunes that amount to “a hot slab of unrepentant Rock and Roll right between the ears,” according to the band’s promotional material. Apparently dissatisfied with the state of modern music, but holding dear to the bygone spirit of rock’s past pioneers, One Hand Free set out to restore the heart and soul of rock ’n’ roll. The album begins with the blues-based “King By Now,” which quickly introduces gritty instrumental attitude, as well as the bluesy and soulful vocal attack of singer and keyboardist Andrew Blowen. A couple of minutes later, Geoff Taylor’s bass line shifts gears and guitarist Josh DiJoseph asserts his authority with a gripping electric solo. Meanwhile, drummer Kelly Bower anchors everything with tight, punctuating drumbeats. The next song, “Majesty,” begins with a guitar melody that sounds like something out of Steely Dan’s playbook. At six minutes and 14 seconds, it is the longest track on the disc. © Matt Kanner Thursday, 27 December 2007, © 2009 The Wire

It has been almost four years since Portsmouth rock ’n’ rollers One Hand Free released a new album. The group’s self-titled 2004 release established the band as an assemblage of classic rock purists, determined to deliver the type of 1960s and ’70s style rock that inspired them to take up their instruments. The latest disc, released on the record label ThunderTrauzer, cranks up the volume of the band’s musical mission. Officially due out in January, “Quadraphonic” features eight original tunes that amount to “a hot slab of unrepentant Rock and Roll right between the ears,” according to the band’s promotional material. Apparently dissatisfied with the state of modern music, but holding dear to the bygone spirit of rock’s past pioneers, One Hand Free set out to restore the heart and soul of rock ’n’ roll. The album begins with the blues-based “King By Now,” which quickly introduces gritty instrumental attitude, as well as the bluesy and soulful vocal attack of singer and keyboardist Andrew Blowen. A couple of minutes later, Geoff Taylor’s bass line shifts gears and guitarist Josh DiJoseph asserts his authority with a gripping electric solo. Meanwhile, drummer Kelly Bower anchors everything with tight, punctuating drumbeats. The next song, “Majesty,” begins with a guitar melody that sounds like something out of Steely Dan’s playbook. At six minutes and 14 seconds, it is the longest track on the disc. Most of the songs on “Quadraphonic” are fast-paced and upbeat, but a couple of tracks, most notably “Lucky” and “Stumble,” slow down to enter different dimensions of sonic emotion. “Badway” brings out a funkier edge, reflecting the band members’ admiration for genres slightly outside the rock realm. Blowen’s lyrics match the mood of each song, at times expressing glory and, at others, adversity. Although the style showcased on the new CD is admittedly unoriginal, it will likely appeal to fans of classic rock and jam bands. With echoes of older groups like Lynyrd Skynyrd and Joe Cocker matched by wisps of comparatively more recent acts like The Black Crowes and Dave Matthews Band, “Quadraphonic” presents a timeless sound that radiates from the core of rock music. The album’s appeal is likely to be strongest with those hangers-on who grew up in the ’60s and ’70s and were invigorated by the torrent of rock talent that emerged during that era. The band reaches backward rather than forward, striving not to innovate new sounds but to recreate old ones. However, the songs are all original One Hand Free compositions, and each musician’s rock ’n’ roll passion is refreshingly authentic. The latest disc was mixed by Joel Hamilton, who has previously worked with a range of artists that includes, Elvis Costello, Tom Waits, Mike Patton, Justin Timberlake and Ludacris. It was mastered by Jay Frigoletto, who has worked with Alice in Chains, Oasis, INXS, Tesla and Blondie, among others. While touring the Northeast in support of its last album, One Hand Free shared stages with Eddie Money, Godsmack and members of The Allman Brothers Band. After a lengthy hiatus, the quartet will return to the stage next month, starting with a show at the Dover Brick House on Friday, Jan. 18. Other performances in Portsmouth, Boston and Portland will be announced soon. © One Hand Free, © 2009 The Wire

New England based One Hand Free continues their Rock and Roll crusade with the long awaited follow-up to their acclaimed 2004 self titled debut. 'Quadraphonic' is a call to arms, commanding the listener's attention from the opening riff of 'King by now' to the cacophonous finale of the hauntingly beautiful 'Stumble'. Masterfully engineered by guitarist, Josh DiJoseph, 'Quadraphonic' was delivered to Studio G Brooklyn and placed in the able and adventurous hands of mix-guru Joel Hamilton (Tom Waits, Mike Patton, Soulive, Dixie Witch, Dub Trio), and subsequently mastered by Grammy winner, Jay Frigoletto (War, Fu Manchu, Alice in Chains, INXS, Rhino Records). While firmly rooted in classic and southern rock, One Hand Free puts their love of classic soul, R&B and funk on display with echoes of The Isley Brothers, Tower of Power and Stevie Wonder. This is most evident in 'Badway', a long time staple of OHF's live performances, represented here in all its funk-rock glory. The title, 'Quadraphonic', is a nod to One Hand Free's belief that its members are but four facets of a sharp and gleaming sonic stone, as well as a multi layered reference meant to summon spirits of a time when Rock and Roll albums were unified, and unifying works of both art and energy, a synergy of creativity and commerce, and a breeding ground of communication and connection. Members Andrew Blowen (vocals, Hammond organ, electric piano, synth), Josh DiJoseph (guitars), Geoff Taylor (bass) and Kelly Bower (drums) effortlessly connect and communicate with each other, the result of years spent working together toward a common goal and a mutual respect and admiration for one another's undeniable talents. What s even more remarkable is the connection to their fans, both old and new, from Munich to Moscow to Malden, Mass., who stand united amidst all the glory and grime inherent in the home grown, hand rolled, original Rock and Roll of One Hand Free. What have you done for Rock lately? Published by: Thundertrauzer Enterprises , © 2009 Target.com. All rights reserved

BIO

When One Hand Free lay hands on their instruments, they manifest all the glory and all the grime inherent in the magic of authentic home grown, hand rolled, original Rock and Roll. Remember Rock and Roll? When undistilled and uncleaved, Rock and Roll is the most intoxicating blend of roots and influences known to man. One Hand Free's brand is original and hand crafted, at it's full potency. To Rock is truth: the raw power to penetrate and communicate needn't be obscured by genre or made safe by classification. You know it when you hear it. To Roll is pure: the pursuit of the sublime fears no inhibition of hard or soft, easy or complex. You know it when you feel it. To say that One Hand Free play Rock and Roll is to oversimplify. One Hand Free ARE Rock and Roll. They sweat it, pump it, grind it, grunt it, strut it, flaunt it, beg it, whisper it, shout it, believe it, and preach it. They do what it takes to bring true Rock and Roll to a world vastly in need. "Quadraphonic", released January 2008 through Thundertrauzer Enterprises, is a major step forward in achieving One Hand Free's goal of returning Rock and Roll to it's visceral, yet sanctified throne atop the pantheon of authentically interactive entertainment. The audience is ensured a broad audio pallet with which to work by virtue of an adventurous mix helmed by Joel Hamilton (Tom Waits, Mike Patton, Soulive, Dub Trio) and skillfully transmitted by Grammy winning mastering engineer Jay Frigoletto ( War, Fu Manchu, Alice In Chains, Rhino Records). Conjuring in equal parts the cerebral curiosity of Emerson, Lake and Palmer, the bawdy and elemental bottom line of early Aerosmith, and the brute force of Mountain, the scope of the record stimulates notions of both the gutter and the grandiose. The band, consisting of Andrew Blowen (Vocals/Keyboards), Geoff Taylor (Bass), Josh DiJoseph (Guitar/Engineering), and Kelly Bower (Drums), crafted the album in the spirit of The Band and Stevie Wonder: amidst hot solder, rejuvenated Hammond organs, and piles of vinyl in their personal audio play pen known as "The Mood Tube". They found their determination not to settle for the paint by numbers aesthetic of typical studio logistics spurred on by a cathartic swell of support among European rock revival audiences, sparked by press coverage in the Dutch magazine "Aktueel". The sessions, a year long odyssey of Steely Dan - esque lab work and Government Mule - like hotbox live takes, were the culmination of lessons gleaned and peaks glimpsed touring the Northeast in support of the band's self titled first album, released in 2004 by Austin, TX label Halt Music Company. The immediacy and intimacy of One Hand Free's live performances, on stages such as Nectar's, Harper's Ferry, The Stone Church, and The Casino Ballroom, with acts as varied as Eddie Money, members of the Allman Brothers Band, and Godsmack, are evident in the collection of 8 songs that sear their value into the head, heart, and hips. The title, "Quadraphonic", is a nod to One Hand Free's belief that it's members are but four facets of a sharp and gleaming sonic stone, as well as a multi layered reference meant to summon spirits of a time when Rock and Roll albums were unified, and unifying works of both art and energy, a synergy of creativity and commerce, and a breeding ground of communication and connection. One Hand Free bear the standard of today’s Rock and Roll renaissance. "Quadraphonic" conveys their action plan. Bassist Geoff Taylor relates the band ethos, "Know when to be simple, know when to be smart, and never be afraid to hit just the right sweet spot. They might not be aware that they need it, but somewhere deep down, you KNOW that they do". Peel back the two sides of your brain and receive what One Hand Free brings to bear, a hot slab of unrepentant Rock and Roll. Right between the ears. ® 2009 GarageBand.com

4 comments:

Mike said...

Although the audio recording quality leaves a bit to be desired, it's a solid effort. Good songwriting. I wonder what they'll be like a few years from now when they develop.

A.O.O.F.C said...

Hi Mike. Audio quality is notoriously unreliable on many albums. Sometimes even master tapes are not top quality. There's little can be done about that. It's diffcult to know what lies in store for OHF. Some great bands have split after a year or two. Othere are around forever. Marketing and promotion are important, but quality songwriting and musicianship are the most important things. OHF are an above average band and hopefully will improve, and not become too commercial. You gotta do your own thing, regardless of money, and never sell out to the music industry's "fat cats".

bullfrog said...

dead link, will you please re-post, thanks

A.O.O.F.C said...

Hi,bullfrog. Thanks for broken link info. Another LINK @ http://www.mega
upload.com/?d=
9KZWAREL

Thanks to

http://
serdanoite.
blogspot.com
/2010/06/one-
hand-free-one-
hand-free-2004
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