A.O.O.F.C
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Mizar6

babydancing




Get this crazy baby off my head!

APOLOGIES

Sorry about not re-posting. I've an illness in my family, but I will reply to all ASAP. For the time being, my beautiful friend, Eva is helping me out. Thank you for your understanding...Paul

30.4.10

Hummingbird


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Hummingbird - We Can't Go On Meeting Like This - 1976 - A&M Records

This album is full of really good dynamic playing. The rhythms are great, and there are some nice funky soul/jazz touches. Musicians include guitarist, Bernie Holland who once played with the late, great Mike Patto, Hummingbird's founder, the great bassist and guitarist, Bobby Tench who played with Jeff Beck, Van Morrison, Roger Chapman, Eric Burdon and many more, the brilliant keyboardist Max Middleton, who played with Kate Bush, the late John Martyn, Jeff Beck, etc., and the great session vocalist and ex-Blue Mink member, Madeline Bell. Almost forgot to mention that "The World's Greatest Drummer", the shy and retiring Bernard "Pretty" Purdie plays here too! "We Can't Go On Meeting Like This" was a successful album in the mid seventies, but is almost forgotten now. Listen to the band's "Diamond Nights" album

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

A1 Fire And Brimstone - Clive Chaman, Ian Samwell 4:57
A2 Gypsy Skys - Max Middleton 5:17
A3 Trouble Maker - Ian Samwell, Bobby Tench 3:14
A4 Scorpio - Bernie Holland 4:14
A5 We Can't Go On Meeting Like This - Ian Samwell, Bobby Tench, Max Middleton 4:19

B1 The City Mouse - Clive Chaman 4:45
B2 A Friend Forever - Clive Chaman 5:30
B3 Heaven Knows (Where You've Been) - Ian Samwell, Bobby Tench 4:01
B4 Snake Snack - Clive Chaman 4:25
B5 Let It Burn - Bernie Holland, Ian Samwell, Bobby Tench 4:59

MUSICIANS

Guitar - Bernie Holland
Vocals, Guitar - Bobby Tench
Guitar - Robert Ahwai on tracks A1, A2, B1, B4
Bass, Harmonica - Clive Chaman
Keyboards, Synthesizer [Moog] - Max Middleton
Drums - Bernard Purdie
Backing Vocals - Joanne Williams , Liza Strike , Madeline Bell

BIO (WIKI)

Hummingbird were a British rock band, formed in 1974 by Bobby Tench of The Jeff Beck Group and Streetwalkers fame. Hummingbird recorded three successful albums, released by A&M using Ian "Sammy" Samwell as their record producer.The original line up included members of the second Jeff Beck Group, vocalist and guitarist Bobby Tench,keyboardist Max Middleton, bassist Clive Chaman, drummer Conrad Isidore and second guitarist Bernie Holland. At the start of sessions for their first album they were joined by Jeff Beck for a brief period but he did not contribute to the album and left to work on his own project. After the first album Bernie Holland was replaced by guitarist Robert Awhai and drummer Bernard Purdie replaced Isidore on the next two albums,vocalists Madeline Bell and Liza Strike were brought in to complement the band. They found success mainly in the USA, also in Europe and Japan.

Jeff Beck


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Jeff Beck - Guitar Legend - 1998 - Hallmark

Classic '60's material from rock guitar legend, Jeff Beck, who first shot to fame with The Yardbirds. His first hit with the band, "Heart Full Of Soul" is included here along with other blues/R&B songs from the same time period. The first ten tracks on this album are from Jeff's 18 month stint with the Yardbirds, from 1966 to 1967. The albums last four tracks are from Jeff's time with The All Stars, a makeshift band that Jimmy Page got together in 1965, and included Page, Beck, Nicky Hopkins on piano, and Cliff Barton on bass. There are various blues anthology compilations featuring tracks from these line-ups. N.B: The All Stars was a common band name in the early '60s. Before Jimmy Page established his "All Stars" line-up of Jeff Beck (guitar), Cliff Barton (bass), Nicky Hopkins (piano), Carlo Little (drums), and Jimmy himself, there was also The Cyril Davies R&B All Stars, Cyril Davies' All Stars, the Original All Stars, and more. Some of the musicians mentioned here played in various All Stars line-ups, and it would take a whole book in itself to write about this bands "family tree" and offshoots. If you like good British 60's blues/R&B music, you should find some rewarding music here. A lot of this stuff from the early sixties sounds dated now, but many of these musicians like Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, and the late Nicky Hopkins were pioneers of early British blues and R&B, and are hugely important in the evolution of rock music. Please take some time to check out Nicky Hopkin's bio @ about Nicky Hopkins There is no need to elaborate on Jimmy Page's achievements, but you can read his bio @ about Jimmy Page and there is a bio of the great Yardbirds @ YBIRDS Listen to The Yardbird's classic "Roger The Engineer" album with Jeff Beck on board, and also Jeff Beck's killer "Blow by Blow" album

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1. HEART FULL OF SOUL (Gouldman)
2. WHAT DO YOU WANT (Beck-McCarty-Dreja-Relf-SamwelI Smith)
3. l’M NOT TALKING (Allison)
4. STEELED BLUES (Beck-Relf)
5. l'M A MAN (McDaniel)
6. STROLL ON (Bradshaw-Mann-Kay)
7. l AlN'T DONE WRONG (Relf)
8. LIKE JIMMY REED AGAIN (Beck-Relf-Samwell Smith-Dreja-McCarty)
9. YOU'RE A BETTER MAN THAN I (Hugg-Hugg)
10. JEFFS BLUES (Beck)
11. DOWN IN THE BOOTS (Page)
12. CHUCKLES (Page)
13. STEELIN' (Page)
14. LA BREAKDOWN (Page)

MUSICIANS

The Yardbirds
Jimmy Pages All Stars

BIO

While he was as innovative as Jimmy Page, as tasteful as Eric Clapton, and nearly as visionary as Jimi Hendrix, Jeff Beck never achieved the same commercial success as any of his contemporaries, primarily because of the haphazard way he approached his career. After Rod Stewart left the Jeff Beck Group in 1971, Beck never worked with a charismatic lead singer who could have helped sell his music to a wide audience. Furthermore, he was simply too idiosyncratic, moving from heavy metal to jazz fusion within a blink of an eye. As his career progressed, he became more fascinated by automobiles than guitars, releasing only one album during the course of the '90s. All the while, Beck retained the respect of fellow guitarists, who found his reclusiveness all the more alluring. Beck began his musical career following a short stint at London's Wimbledon Art College. He earned a reputation by supporting Lord Sutch, which helped him land the job as the Yardbirds' lead guitarist following the departure of Eric Clapton. Beck stayed with the Yardbirds for nearly two years, leaving in late in 1966 with the pretense that he was retiring from music. He returned several months later with "Love Is Blue," a single he played poorly because he detested the song. Later in 1967, he formed the Jeff Beck Group with vocalist Rod Stewart, bassist Ron Wood, and drummer Aynsley Dunbar, who was quickly replaced by Mickey Waller; keyboardist Nicky Hopkins joined in early 1968. With their crushingly loud reworkings of blues songs and vocal and guitar interplay, the Jeff Beck Group established the template for heavy metal. Neither of the band's records, Truth (1968) or Beck-Ola (a 1969 album that was recorded with new drummer Tony Newman), was particularly successful, and the band tended to fight regularly, especially on their frequent tours of the U.S. In 1970, Stewart and Wood left to join the Faces, and Beck broke up the group. Beck had intended to form a power trio with Vanilla Fudge members Carmine Appice (drums) and Tim Bogert (bass), but those plans were derailed when he suffered a serious car crash in 1970. By the time he recuperated in 1971, Bogart and Appice were playing in Cactus, so the guitarist formed a new version of the Jeff Beck Group. Featuring keyboardist Max Middleton, drummer Cozy Powell, bassist Clive Chaman, and vocalist Bobby Tench, the new band recorded Rough and Ready (1971) and Jeff Beck Group (1972). Neither album attracted much attention. Cactus dissolved in late 1972, and Beck, Bogert, and Appice formed a power trio the following year. The group's lone studio album -- a live record was released in Japan but never in the U.K. or U.S. -- was widely panned due to its plodding arrangements and weak vocals, and the group disbanded the following year. For about 18 months, Beck remained quiet, re-emerging in 1975 with Blow by Blow. Produced by George Martin, Blow by Blow was an all-instrumental jazz fusion album that received strong reviews. Beck collaborated with Jan Hammer, a former keyboardist for Mahavishnu Orchestra, for 1976's Wired, and supported the album with a co-headlining tour with Hammer's band. The tour was documented on the 1977 album Jeff Beck with the Jan Hammer Group -- Live. After the Hammer tour, Beck retired to his estate outside of London and remained quiet for three years. He returned in 1980 with There and Back, which featured contributions from Hammer. Following the tour for There and Back, Beck retired again, returning five years later with the slick, Nile Rodgers-produced Flash. A pop/rock album recorded with a variety of vocalists, Flash featured Beck's only hit single, the Stewart-sung "People Get Ready," and also boasted "Escape," which won the Grammy for Best Rock Instrumental. During 1987, he played lead guitar on Mick Jagger's second solo album, Primitive Cool. There was another long wait between Flash and 1989's Jeff Beck's Guitar Shop with Terry Bozzio and Tony Hymas. Though the album sold only moderately well, Guitar Shop received uniformly strong reviews and won the Grammy for Best Rock Instrumental. Beck supported the album with a tour, this time co-headlining with guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan. Again, Beck entered semi-retirement upon the completion of the tour. In 1992, Beck played lead guitar on Roger Waters' comeback album, Amused to Death. A year later, he released Crazy Legs, a tribute to Gene Vincent and his lead guitarist, Cliff Gallup, which was recorded with Big Town Playboys. Beck remained quiet after the album's release prior to resurfacing in 1999 with Who Else! You Had It Coming followed in 2001 and his 14th release, Jeff, was issued on Epic two years later. An excellent live set, Performing This Week: Live at Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club, was released in 2008 by Eagle Records. Emotion & Commotion, Beck's first new studio album in seven years, appeared in the spring of 2010. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:3iftxqw5ldse~T1

27.4.10

Nucleus


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Nucleus - The Pretty Redhead (Live At The BBC 1971 & 1982) - 2003 - Hux Records (UK)

The doyen of British jazz-rock groups, Nucleus was formed in 1969 by trumpeter Ian Carr. He was joined by Chris Spedding, John Marshall and Karl Jenkins. (The latter two went on to join Soft Machine a few years later.) In 1970, Nucleus won the band competition at the Montreux Jazz Festival. The following year, they recorded their debut BBC session, which is now released here for the first time. This is one of the last times that the founder members of Nucleus appeared together, as guitarist Chris Spedding left soon afterwards. If the first session here gives us the opportunity to hear a well-established Nucleus line-up reinterpreting some of its best-known material, the second session (also released here for the first time) is even more of a treat, as this particular version of the band never recorded commercially, and it is Ian¹s only known recording of his piece, The Pretty Redhead. "I'm very pleased with it", Ian says now in his liner notes, "It generates terrific feeling." The release of these BBC recordings shows both the original line-up and a much later edition of the band playing at their fiery best for a radio audience. All in all, a delight for Nucleus buffs, and a fine introduction to the band¹s work for newcomers. © http://www.huxrecords.com/cdsales38.htm
The six BBC tracks on The Pretty Redhead boast fine sound and were recorded at sessions on March 9, 1971 and October 6, 1982. The tracks present Nucleus at quite different phases of their career. The personnel differ quite a bit on each session, too, though Ian Carr and John Marshall are present on both. The first three tracks are from the 1971 date, and show them as an instrumental jazz fusion band not too far removed in tone from the latter-day Soft Machine — hardly a surprise as Karl Jenkins and John Marshall would both join that band the following year. The influence of early electric Miles Davis is heavily felt as well, in a performance that marked one of guitarist Chris Spedding's last appearances with the outfit. As the sleeve notes point out, the version of "Song from a Bearded Lady," a tune from their second album, differs markedly from the studio arrangement in its introductory portion. Despite the large shuffle in personnel, Nucleus were playing in pretty much the same style, though perhaps a tad more inside, on their 1982 session, which marked their only known recording with the lineup featuring Carr, Marshall, saxophonist Tim Whitehead, guitarist Mark Wood, and bassist Joe Hubbard. It's also notable for the inclusion of the group's only known recording of Carr's composition "The Pretty Redhead," though Carr's brief comment at the top of the liner notes laments his failure to hit a couple of high notes in the intro and coda .© Richie Unterberger © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:gxfyxqqaldfe
This is a bit like the proverbial waiting for a bus and then three come along together. Except in the case of Nucleus you get several re-releases and two 'buses' you never expected. The first, the Cuneiform CD 'Nucleus live in Bremen' was a welcome surprise, but this Hux release is an absolute delight. It is impossible to exaggerate just how important this Hux CD is because it covers unchartered waters in several areas. One is that it, for the first time, displays how good the original Nucleus line-up was playing live. This is demonstrated on the first three tracks ('Song for the bearded lady', 'Elastic rock' and 'Snakehip's dream' where the level of musicianship is superb and Chris Spedding, who said farewell to the jazz scene shortly after leaving Nucleus in favour of other music, is heard in a staggeringly creative context. At times on 'Snakehips' he sounds like a cross between Steve Cropper and John McLaughlin (Jack Johnson era). It is so refreshing to hear 'Song for the bearded lady' and 'Elastic rock' played live that they almost sound like completely new tunes. Again, the live context gives them a dynamic and edge not heard on the original studio recordings. The solos by Carr and Smith particularly are impressive. The later set begins with a 12-bar blues 'Easy does it now' and presents a new incarnation of Nucleus although with Carr (obviously) and Marshall present. A new sound does emerge, but equal in sophistication and funk to the earlier versions of the band. 'Easy does it' begins with a riff which hooks into the memory long after it's been heard - so be warned. Then we have previously never released title track 'The Pretty Redhead' with solos by Whitehead, Carr and Wood. 'Redhead' is a funky starting piece which transforms into a quiet, reflective almost ballad-esque one. It engages the listener straight away. Finally there is the elegiac 'For Miles and Miles' with sombre muted trumpet by Carr, which despite its soulful beginning miraculously changes gear and tempo halfway through and becomes an upbeat and joyful reflection of Miles' later period. This is a really important release for British jazz fans and perhaps all modern jazzers because the quality of the recording is brilliant (although 'live', there is no discernable audience present) and also because this is one of the very first modern British jazz bands to have BBC sessions released on CD. Also, because they are BBC recordings, the novel 'live' sound heard here of Nucleus is recorded in totally first class conditions and is automatically historically important because of this. I only hope that Hux might consider salvaging other long lost gems of British modern jazz from the library vaults of the BBC (should they still be there) because this would be a substantial service to this genre. For Nucleus fans I would need to say that this is not only an indispensable album, but also a truly fantastic one. The cover is great too, accompanied with sleeve notes by Alyn Shipton. Remember, these recordings aren't merely rehashes of old studio tracks played live, they are, in effect, new pieces, often, as with 'Snakehip's dream' with minor changes to the original arrangement. 'The Pretty Redhead' is therefore destined to become an album of the year. Track listing: 1) Song For The Bearded Lady 2) Elastic Rock 3) Snakehips Dream Recorded: March 9, 1971. Studio 1, Kensington House, London, for broadcast overseas on 'Jazz London' for the BBC Transcription Service. Ian Carr (t, fl); Brian Smith (ss, ts, fl); Karl Jenkins (bar, ob, p, elp); Chris Spedding (g); Jeff Clyne (b, eb); John Marshall (d). : 4) Easy Does It Now 5) The Pretty Redhead 6) For Miles and Miles Recorded: October 6, 1982. Maida Vale Studios, London, for 'Jazz In Britain' on BBC Radio 3. The original broadcast was introduced by Charles Fox.Ian Carr (t, fh); Tim Whitehead (ss, ts); Mark Wood (g) ; Joe Hubbard (elb); John Marshall (d). © Roger Farbey, April 2003 http://www.iancarrsnucleus.net/Reviews/PrettyRedheadreview
Nothing much more to add about this important historic musical document from one of the world's greatest jazz fusion bands. The album is VHR by A.O.O.F.C. Search this blog for other Ian Carr/Nucleus releases

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1 Song for the Bearded Lady - Karl Jenkins 10:30
2 Elastic Rock - Karl Jenkins 6:03
3 Snakehips Dream - Ian Carr 8:13
4 Easy Does It Now - Ian Carr 9:33
5 The Pretty Redhead - Ian Carr 9:06
6 For Miles and Miles - Ian Carr 6:37

Tracks 1-3 Recorded: March 9, 1971. Studio 1, Kensington House, London, for broadcast overseas on 'Jazz London' for the BBC Transcription Service. Ian Carr (t, fl); Brian Smith (ss, ts, fl); Karl Jenkins (bar, ob, p, elp); Chris Spedding (g); Jeff Clyne (b, eb); John Marshall (d). Tracks 4-6 Recorded: October 6, 1982. Maida Vale Studios, London, for 'Jazz In Britain' on BBC Radio 3. The original broadcast was introduced by Charles Fox.Ian Carr (t, fh); Tim Whitehead (ss, ts); Mark Wood (g); Joe Hubbard (elb); John Marshall (d).

MUSICIANS

Ian Carr (flute, trumpet, flugelhorn)
Chris Spedding, Mark Wood (guitar)
Jeff Clyne, Joe Hubbard (electric bass)
Karl Jenkins (oboe, piano, electric piano)
John Marshall (drums)
Brian Smith (flute, soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone)
Tim Whitehead (soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone)

SHORT BIO

Nucleus began its long jazz-rock journey in 1969, when it was originally formed by trumpeter Ian Carr. They attracted a following after a successful performance at the Montreux International Festival in 1970, which led to the critical success of albums Elastic Rock and We'll Talk About It Later. The other members consisted of saxophonist Karl Jenkins, drummer John Marshall, and guitarist Chris Spedding. Spedding split after the first two albums, but the rest of the lineup lasted until 1972, when Jenkins and Marshall both left to join Soft Machine. Belladonna was the first album with only Carr, and although he enlisted the help of guitarist Allan Holdsworth, the band eventually became a solo venture for his music. They finally broke up in the mid-'80s after several Carr-only albums. © Bradley Torreano © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved. http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:39fexq85ldse

IAN CARR BIO [Born: April 21, 1933, Dumfries, Scotland: Died: February 25, 2009, London, England. RIP]

Ian Carr has been on the cutting edge of the British jazz scene for nearly four decades. Self-trained as a musician, Carr played an important role in the development of jazz-rock fusion, playing with John McLaughlin in the early '60s, forming one of England's first electronic jazz-rock fusion groups, Nucleus, in 1969 and playing with the international band the United Jazz Rock Ensemble, since 1975. In 1982, Carr received a Calabria award in southern Italy for Outstanding Contribution in the Field of Jazz. Wire Magazine presented him a special award for services to British jazz in 1987. Carr has been equally influential as a music journalist and educator. The co-author of a jazz encyclopedia, The Essential Companion, Carr was also the author of Music Outside, an examination of contemporary British jazz published in 1973; Miles Davis: The Definitive Biography, published in 1982; and Keith Jarrett: The Man and His Music, published in 1991. Since 1992, Carr has written a monthly column for BBC Music Magazine. Carr is an associate professor at the Guildhall School of Music and Dance and lectures weekly on jazz history. Born in Scotland and raised in England, Carr thought little of a career in music until he was nearly 30 years old. Educated at King's College in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, where he studied English literature, Carr served in the Army in the late '50s. Shortly after his discharge, he formed a band, the EmCee Five, with his brother Mike and John McLaughlin. Carr remained with the band for two years, leaving to form the Rendell-Carr Group with saxophonist Don Rendell in 1962. During the seven years he worked with Rendell, Carr helped the band record five albums. In September 1969, Carr helped form the groundbreaking fusion band Nucleus. The group attracted international acclaim when it took the top prize in a competition at the Montreaux International Festival in 1970. Carr continued to play with Nucleus until 1989 when he left to tour the United Kingdom and Europe as a soloist on electric trumpet with an Anglo-American orchestra led by American composer George Russell. Old Heartland was recorded with the Kreisler String Orchestra in 1988 while Sounds and Sweet Airs was recorded with organist John Taylor in 1992. © Craig Harris, All Music Guide © 2010 Answers Corporation http://www.answers.com/topic/ian-carr

Nucleus


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Nucleus - Snakehips Etcetera - 1975 - Vertigo

"Snakehips Etcetera" was never regarded as one of Ian Carr & Nucleus' strongest albums. Bob Bertles "Rat's Bag" has been called "cliché-filled half-funk". The album has also been called "predictable". One review described the album as "a corny album, a dirty album, a cool album, with a few sporadic hints of grit, but lacking punch" Make what you like out of that ! On 'Snakehips Etcetera', Nucleus was reduced to a sextet with Ian Carr doubling on moog, and piano. Bertles, Shaw, and Castle are still in this '75 Nucleus formation. Roger Sutton on bass and percussion, and Roger Sellers on drums and percussion, make up the "new" rhythm section. "Rat's Bag" is great funky fusion with Ian Carr blowing some great trumpet and Geoff throwing in some classy clavinet. The horn parts are overdubbed very well, giving the impression that there are more than two horns on the tracks. The melodies may be less cerebral than other Nucleus albums, but they are infectious, and will grab you just as much as any of Nucleus' other album tracks. "Alive and Kicking" begins with what sounds like sampled vocals, and Bob Bertles plays some great "snaky" soprano sax on this track. Ken Shaw's guitar work is up to his usual high standard throughout the album. Ian Carr's piano playing on the funky "Rachel's Tune" is also of the highest calibre. "Pussyfoot" is another great Ian Carr number, with marvellous flute from Bob Bertles. "Heyday" finishes of the album in style with with tasteful, bluesy acoustic guitar from Ken Shaw. Many music critics must have been having an "off day" when reviewing this album. In fact, more attention has been paid to the provocative album cover than the great music on the disc. Never judge a book by it's cover, or a record by it's sleeve ! Overall, "Snakehips Etcetera" is a great example of funky jazz fusion, with cool grooves, and impeccable musicianship from one of Britain's greatest jazz fusion bands. "Snakehips Etcetera" is HR by A.O.O.F.C. Search this blog for more Ian Carr/Nucleus related releases.

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

A1 Rat's Bag - Bob Bertles
A2 Alive And Kicking - Roger Sutton
A3 Rachel's Tune - Geoff Castle

B1 Snakehips Etcetera - Ian Carr
B2 Pussyfoot - Ian Carr
B3 Heyday - Ian Carr

MUSICIANS

Guitar, Percussion - Ken Shaw
Bass, Percussion - Roger Sutton
Keyboards, Synthesizer [Moog], Percussion - Geoff Castle
Drums, Percussion - Roger Sellers
Saxophone [Alto, Soprano, Baritone], Flute, Voice, Percussion - Bob Bertles
Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Piano, Synthesizer [Moog], Percussion - Ian Carr RIP

SHORT BIO

Nucleus began its long jazz-rock journey in 1969, when it was originally formed by trumpeter Ian Carr. They attracted a following after a successful performance at the Montreux International Festival in 1970, which led to the critical success of albums Elastic Rock and We'll Talk About It Later. The other members consisted of saxophonist Karl Jenkins, drummer John Marshall, and guitarist Chris Spedding. Spedding split after the first two albums, but the rest of the lineup lasted until 1972, when Jenkins and Marshall both left to join Soft Machine. Belladonna was the first album with only Carr, and although he enlisted the help of guitarist Allan Holdsworth, the band eventually became a solo venture for his music. They finally broke up in the mid-'80s after several Carr-only albums. © Bradley Torreano © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved. http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:39fexq85ldse

IAN CARR BIO [Born: April 21, 1933, Dumfries, Scotland: Died: February 25, 2009, London, England. RIP]

Ian Carr has been on the cutting edge of the British jazz scene for nearly four decades. Self-trained as a musician, Carr played an important role in the development of jazz-rock fusion, playing with John McLaughlin in the early '60s, forming one of England's first electronic jazz-rock fusion groups, Nucleus, in 1969 and playing with the international band the United Jazz Rock Ensemble, since 1975. In 1982, Carr received a Calabria award in southern Italy for Outstanding Contribution in the Field of Jazz. Wire Magazine presented him a special award for services to British jazz in 1987. Carr has been equally influential as a music journalist and educator. The co-author of a jazz encyclopedia, The Essential Companion, Carr was also the author of Music Outside, an examination of contemporary British jazz published in 1973; Miles Davis: The Definitive Biography, published in 1982; and Keith Jarrett: The Man and His Music, published in 1991. Since 1992, Carr has written a monthly column for BBC Music Magazine. Carr is an associate professor at the Guildhall School of Music and Dance and lectures weekly on jazz history. Born in Scotland and raised in England, Carr thought little of a career in music until he was nearly 30 years old. Educated at King's College in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, where he studied English literature, Carr served in the Army in the late '50s. Shortly after his discharge, he formed a band, the EmCee Five, with his brother Mike and John McLaughlin. Carr remained with the band for two years, leaving to form the Rendell-Carr Group with saxophonist Don Rendell in 1962. During the seven years he worked with Rendell, Carr helped the band record five albums. In September 1969, Carr helped form the groundbreaking fusion band Nucleus. The group attracted international acclaim when it took the top prize in a competition at the Montreaux International Festival in 1970. Carr continued to play with Nucleus until 1989 when he left to tour the United Kingdom and Europe as a soloist on electric trumpet with an Anglo-American orchestra led by American composer George Russell. Old Heartland was recorded with the Kreisler String Orchestra in 1988 while Sounds and Sweet Airs was recorded with organist John Taylor in 1992. © Craig Harris, All Music Guide © 2010 Answers Corporation http://www.answers.com/topic/ian-carr

26.4.10

Zach Prather & The Blues Express


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Zach Prather & The Blues Express - Tools Of The Trade - 2004 - Taxi Records, France

Good modern Chicago blues with some great touches of '60's and '70's British blues rock. There is also plenty of boogie and funk in the mix. Even before he started drumming, playing quitar, and singing at most of his native Chicago' s clubs, Zach cut his first single for Curtis Mayfield. The LA Times dubbed him the “New Bad Boy of the Blues”. Zach has played with artists like the late Screamin J. Hawkins, Etta James, the late Willy Dixon, the late great Minnie Ripperton and he played with the late Luther Allison for over three years. In 1995, the late Jay Hawkins said that "Zach has talent. He has talent in the vocal departement, he has talent on the guitar, the drums, but even better still he has talent as a writer, a writer of lyrics and a writer of music. In the old days you had to have talent, and this is where Zach Prather will stand and be counted". This is not an outstanding album, and there are no exceptional tracks, but full marks to Zach Prather and his band for demonstrating great musicianship, and a genuine feeling for the blues. Zach Prather is a great musician, and deserves more media coverage. Buy Zach Prather & Slight Return's "Freak" album, and promote this guy. Also read earlyblues' Alan White's interview with Zach @ http://www.dixonlandingmusic.com/artists/zach-prather/reviews/

TRACKS

1 I stand accused (04:36)
2 Whats the hitch (03:36)
3 Run back (04:48)
4 Expressway (02:59)
5 Memphis (03:39)
6 Low rider (03:59)
7 Smooth sailing (05:01)
8 What goes up (03:09)
9 Warrior (03:26)
10 Hand in another glove (03:47)
11 Waste not want not (03:32)
12 Nobodies home (09:09)
13 Roll with the punch (02:35)
14 Lay your burden down (04:20)

All songs composed by Zach Prather

BAND

Zach Prather - Lead Vocal, lead and rhythm guitar
Urs Baumele - Bass
Michel Caras - Keyboards
Eric Kunz - Drums

BIO

Born in Chicago in 1952, Zach Prather grew up listening to many of the great Blues players. He began playing at the age of 13 and by the time he was 15, he had made his first record with Curtis Mayfields Lable Curtom Records. During this time he had commence playing at many of the well known clubs and venues in the Chicago area. At 17 Prather completed two years military service, after which he formed another Band and returned to the club scene. However, it was not the local Blues players that influenced Prather then, rather the British Invasion groups such as the Rolling Stones, the Kinks, Small faces and the Who. In 1974, Prather moved to Los Angeles and began playing with another Chicago guitar player, Cash McCall. Together they performed with some of the biggest names in the Blues, including Screamin J Hawkins, Etta James and of course Willy Dixon. "Cash and I had allready become very good friends when he introduced me to Willy and in a short time we also were very close, so he, Willy, decided we should record together. Willy really liked the things I was doing, he knew people where calling it Rock 'n Roll but no one knew better then him where Rock 'n Roll came from. During this Recording Project Willie became ill. Prather was with him the day before He died, and he will always be grateful fore being able to meet this man and fore all he taught him about life which is the blues. Latter while touring Europe with Screamin J. Zach meet Luther Allison, after one Jam Session and some quick arrangements Zach moved to Paris where he performed with Luther fore 3 and a half years. While living in Paris, Zach made his first cd called Never My Love, with Melodie/Encore records. He has not stopped since .......© http://www.zach-prather.com/

25.4.10

The Blues Project


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The Blues Project - Lazarus - 1971 - Capitol


First of all, a big thanks to Mike Pell, the renowned radio broadcaster and musicologist for referring this band's great "Flute Thing" instrumental by Al Kooper to me, a track which I was unfamiliar with. - (A.O.O.F.C).
On paper, the Blues Project was a great idea, but in spite of an abundance of talent (Al Kooper, Steve Katz, Danny Kalb, and Tommy Flanders were all members), somehow the band's innovative mix of blues, folk, rock, pop, and jazz never quite gelled the way it should have. The original lineup released one studio project (Projections) and two live sets (Live at the Café Au Go Go and Live at Town Hall) in the late '60s before collapsing from the usual ailments of the era (ego, poor management, drugs), leaving behind a sketchy but occasionally brilliant legacy. Kooper and Katz went on to form Blood, Sweat & Tears, while Roy Blumenfeld started up Seatrain and Kalb pasted his life back together after a few too many heavy acid trips. In 1971, newly signed to Capitol Records, the Blues Project resurfaced as a trio, with bassist and saxman Don Kretmar of Seatrain joining Kalb and Blumenfeld for Lazarus, which was recorded in England and produced by Shel Talmy. While Lazarus doesn't rise to the level of the original band, it does feature some striking tracks, including Kalb's pretty, impressionistic "Vision of Flowers," the ominous title cut, "Lazarus," and the rocking version of Joe Turner's "It's All Right Baby" that opens the set. Kretmar's tenor sax work is a delight throughout the album, as is the piano contribution of session player Tom Parker. N.B: the preceding review is © Steve Leggett © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved The review here is not the full article. Read it @ http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:hpfixqqsldje
Guitarist Danny Kalb, formed TBP in Greenwich Village, NYC, in the mid sixties. An eclectic band in the early days, TBP played everything from American roots and Folk music to psychedelic rock. The great Al Kooper joined The Blues Project on keyboards in 1965, but left shortly before the band played Monterey in 1967. With Steve Katz, Al was a founder of the great jazz rock outfit, Blood Sweat and Tears, which he left in 1968. The Blues Project released four albums in the sixties, before "Lazarus" was released in 1971, (and posted here), and a further two albums between 1972 and 1973. Half of The Blues Project evolved into Sea Train. "Lazarus" is quite a good album, musically. The vocals could be stronger, but there is a lot of great playing here, especially the guitar work from Dave Cohen and Danny Kalb. Most of the songs are well written, and the band's blend of jazz, blues and psychedelic rock works well. Listen to the band's exceptional "Projections" album from 1966, and also their 1973 "Reunion In Central Park" album. BS&T's "Child Is Father to the Man" album, on which Al Kooper solely penned six of the album's twelve brilliant tracks, is a great listen, as is Danny Kalb's “Livin’ with The Blues” album. It is also worth hearing Al Kooper's wonderful "Naked Songs" album.

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

It's Alright - P.L. Johnson/Turner, J.
Personal Mercy - Roy Blumenfeld
Black Night - Trad.
Visions Of Flowers - Danny Kalb
Yellow Cab - Tim Hardin
Lazarus - Trad.
Brown Eyed Handsome Man - Chuck Berry
Reachings - Danny Kalb
Midnight Rain - Roy Blumenfeld
So Far, So Near - Don Kretmar

BAND

David Bennett Cohen - Guitar, Keyboards
Danny Kalb - Guitar
Roy Blumenfeld - Drums
Don Kretmar - Saxophone
Tommy Flanders - Vocals

BIO

One of the first album-oriented, "underground" groups in the United States, the Blues Project offered an electric brew of rock, blues, folk, pop, and even some jazz, classical, and psychedelia during their brief heyday in the mid-'60s. It's not quite accurate to categorize them as a blues-rock group, although they did plenty of that kind of material; they were more like a Jewish-American equivalent to British bands like the Yardbirds, who used a blues and R&B base to explore any music that interested them. Erratic songwriting talent and a lack of a truly outstanding vocalist prevented them from rising to the front line of '60s bands, but they recorded plenty of interesting material over the course of their first three albums, before the departure of their most creative members took its toll. The Blues Project was formed in Greenwich Village in the mid-'60s by guitarist Danny Kalb (who had played sessions for various Elektra folk and folk-rock albums), Steve Katz (a guitarist with Elektra's Even Dozen Jug Band), flutist/bassist Andy Kulberg, drummer Roy Blumenfeld, and singer Tommy Flanders. Al Kooper, in his early twenties a seasoned vet of rock sessions, joined after sitting in on the band's Columbia Records audition, although they ended up signing to Verve, an MGM subsidiary. Early member Artie Traum (guitar) dropped out during early rehearsals; Flanders would leave after their first LP, Live at the Cafe Au-Go-Go (1966). The eclectic résumés of the musicians, who came from folk, jazz, blues, and rock backgrounds, was reflected in their choice of material. Blues by Muddy Waters and Chuck Berry tunes ran alongside covers of contemporary folk-rock songs by Eric Anderson and Patrick Sky, as well as the group's own originals. These were usually penned by Kooper, who had already built songwriting credentials as the co-writer of Gary Lewis' huge smash "This Diamond Ring," and established a reputation as a major folk-rock shaker with his contributions to Dylan's mid-'60s records. Kooper also provided the band's instrumental highlights with his glowing organ riffs. The live debut sounds rather tame and derivative; the group truly hit their stride on Projections (late 1966), which was, disappointingly, their only full-length studio recording. While they went through straight blues numbers with respectable energy, they really shone best on the folk and jazz-influenced tracks, like "Fly Away," Katz's lilting "Steve's Song," Kooper's jazz instrumental "Flute Thing" (an underground radio standard that's probably their most famous track), and Kooper's fierce adaptation of an old Blind Willie Johnson number, "I Can't Keep from Crying." A non-LP single from this era, the pop-psychedelic "No Time Like the Right Time," was their greatest achievement and one of the best "great hit singles that never were" of the decade. The band's very eclecticism didn't augur well for their long-term stability, and in 1967 Kooper left in a dispute over musical direction (he has recalled that Kalb opposed his wishes to add a horn section). Then Kalb mysteriously disappeared for months after a bad acid trip, which effectively finished the original incarnation of the band. A third album, Live at Town Hall, was a particularly half-assed project given the band's stature, pasted together from live tapes and studio outtakes, some of which were overdubbed with applause to give the impression that they had been recorded in concert. Kooper got to fulfill his ambitions for soulful horn rock as the leader of the original Blood, Sweat & Tears, although he left that band after their first album; BS&T also included Katz (who stayed onboard for a long time). Blumenfeld and Kulberg kept the Blues Project going for a fourth album before forming Seatrain, and the group re-formed in the early '70s with various lineups, Kooper rejoining for a live 1973 album, Reunion in Central Park. The first three albums from the Kooper days are the only ones that count, though; the best material from these is on Rhino's best-of compilation. © Richie Unterberger © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:fifwxqw5ldde~T1

BIO (WIKI)

The Blues Project was a band from the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City that was formed in 1965 and originally split up in 1967. While their songs drew from a wide array of musical styles, they are most remembered as one of the earliest practitioners of psychedelic rock, as well as one of the world's first jam bands, along with the Grateful Dead. In 1964, Elektra Records produced a compilation album of various artists entitled, The Blues Project, which featured several white musicians from the Greenwich Village area who played acoustic blues music in the style of black musicians. One of the featured artists on the album was a young guitarist named Danny Kalb, who was paid $75 for his two songs. Not long after the album's release, however, Kalb gave up his acoustic guitar for an electric one. The Beatles' arrival in the United States earlier in the year signified the end of the folk and acoustic blues movement that had swept the U.S. in the early 1960s. The ensuing British Invasion was the nail in the coffin. Kalb's first rock and roll band was formed in the spring of 1965, playing under various names at first, until finally settling on the Blues Project moniker as an allusion to Kalb's first foray on record. After a brief hiatus in the summer of 1965 during which Kalb was visiting Europe, the band reformed in September 1965 and were almost immediately a top draw in Greenwich Village. By this time, the band included Danny Kalb on guitar, Steve Katz (having recently departed the Even Dozen Jug Band) also on guitar, Andy Kulberg on bass and flute, Roy Blumenfeld on drums and Tommy Flanders on vocals. The band's first big break came only a few weeks later when they auditioned for Columbia Records, and failed. The audition was a success, nevertheless, as it garnered them an organist in session musician Al Kooper. Kooper had begun his career as a session guitarist, but that summer, he began playing organ when he sneaked into the "Like a Rolling Stone" recording session for Bob Dylan's album, Highway 61 Revisited. In order to improve his musicianship on the new instrument, Kooper joined the Blues Project and began gigging with them almost immediately. Soon thereafter, the Blues Project gained a recording contract from Verve Records, and began recording their first album live at the Cafe Au Go Go in Greenwich Village over the course of a week in November 1965. While the band was known for their lengthy interpretations of blues and traditional rock and roll songs, their first album saw them rein in these tendencies because of record label wariness as well as time restrictions. Entitled Live at The Cafe Au Go Go the album was finished with another week of recordings in January 1966. By that time, Flanders had left the band and, as a result, he appeared on only a few of the songs on this album. The album was a moderate success and the band toured the U.S. to promote it. While in San Francisco, California in April 1966, the Blues Project played at the Fillmore Auditorium to rave reviews. Seemingly New York's answer to the Grateful Dead, even members of the Grateful Dead who saw them play were impressed with their improvisational abilities.(Source: Rock Family Trees - television program) Returning to New York, the band recorded their second album in the fall of 1966, and it was released in November. Projections contained an eclectic set of songs that ran the gamut from blues, R&B, jazz, psychedelia, and folk-rock. The centerpiece of the album was an 11-and-a-half minute version of "Two Trains Running," which, along with other songs on the album, showed off their improvisational tendencies. One such song was the instrumental "Flute Thing", written by Kooper and featuring Kulberg on flute. Soon after the album was completed, though, the band began to fall apart. Kooper quit the band in the spring of 1967, and the band without him completed a third album, Live At Town Hall. Despite the name, only one song was recorded live at Town Hall, while the rest was made up of live recordings from other venues, or of studio outtakes with overdubbed applause to feign a live sound. One song in the latter category, Kooper's "No Time Like the Right Time," would be the band's only charting single. The Blues Project's last hurrah was at the Monterey International Pop Festival held in Monterey, California, in June 1967. By this time, however, half the original line-up was gone. Kooper had formed his own band and played at the festival as well. Katz left soon thereafter, followed by Kalb. A fourth album, 1968's Planned Obsolescence, featured only Blumenfeld and Kulberg from the original lineup, but was released under the Blues Project name at Verve's insistence. Future recordings by this lineup would be released under a new band name, Seatrain. In 1968, Kooper and Katz joined forces to fulfill a desire of Kooper's to form a rock band with a horn section. The result was Blood, Sweat & Tears. While Kooper led the band on its first album, Child Is Father to the Man, he did not take part in any subsequent releases. Katz, on the other hand, remained with the band into the 1970s. In the period between 2001-07 or longer, Roy Blumenfeld has been drumming in the Barry Melton Band (Barry of Country Joe & the Fish fame). The band plays in the Northern California area. The Blues Project, with a modified line-up, reformed briefly in the early 1970s, releasing three further albums: 1971's Lazarus, 1972's The Blues Project, and 1973's The Original Blues Project Reunion In Central Park (which featured Kooper but not Flanders). These albums did little to excite the public and since then, the group's activity has been confined to a few sporadic reunion concerts.

Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel


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Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel - The Quality Of Mercy - 2005 - Gottdiscs

You may not like Rod Stewart's music. The guy went commercial years ago, (and good luck to him, and Glasgow Celtic!), but he can write great songs, and some of his 70's work with the Faces was terrific rock 'n' roll. Rod said that Steve Harley was "one of the finest lyricists the UK has ever produced". Very true, but Steve is also a great musical composer, and his music included some of the best pop rock songs ever to come out of the UK. His songs included "Make Me Smile", "Judy Teen", "Mr. Raffles", "Mr. Soft", "The Best Years Of Our Lives", and "Psychomodo". These are all intelligent, well written songs, with great hooks. These, and many more Harley songs stamped Cockney Rebel with a very individual musical style. Steve Harley was, and still is a superb songwriter, singer, and showman. When "The Quality Of Mercy" was released in 2005, it was the first time Steve had used the Cockney Rebel band label in 26 years. The album proved that Steve Harley never lost it. He still sounds great after four decades on the road. Even in 2005, Steve Harley's sound is still reminiscent of his best 70's work. The songs are beautifully composed, with Cockney Rebel's unique British folk-pop sound still intact. "The Quality Of Mercy" is an example of the enduring talent of Steve Harley and his band, and is HR by A.O.O.F.C. Some really talented and genuine bands and artists were caught up in the notorious "Glam Rock" net in Britain in the mid seventies. Many of these bands were overnight sensations, or one hit wonders, and many were studio manufactured. Some of these bands were also hugely successful, due to clever management and recording songs written by top class songwriters. It is well known that many of these artists couldn't play, or sing, (the perfect recipe for success in the glitzy seventies!). However, some of these artists had predated the "Glam Rock" era, and were hugely talented. Just to name a few - T.Rex, David Bowie, Mott The Hoople, Abba, Elton John, Roy Wood & Wizzard, and Roxy Music. All these artists could sing, play, write brilliant songs, and they would have made the grade regardless of the ridiculous studio trickery that went into other "Glam Rock" bands that eventually fell by the wayside..... "You can fool some of the people, etc, etc....". Anyway, Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel were one of THE great "Glam Rock" bands. and . Without a doubt, one of the most talented bands to emerge in the seventies. Listen to CR's brilliant "The Psychomodo", and "The Human Menagerie" albums , and Steve Harley's "Poetic Justice" album, and you will have gone some distance towards hearing Steve and the band's best work. Find info about Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel's "Best Of The 70's" album @ SHAL&COCKNREB/BOT70s

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1 The Last Goodbye - Cregan, Harley 3:53
2 Journey's End (A Father's Promise) - Anderson, Gladwell, Harley, Lascelles, Wickens 4:04
3 Saturday Night at the Fair - Harley 4:28
4 No Rain on This Parade - Harley 4:43
5 The Coast of Amalfi - Harley 5:17
6 The Last Feast - Harley 7:31
7 Save Me (From Myself) - Harley 5:28
8 When the Halo Slips - Cregan, Harley 4:37
9 A Friend for Life - Cregan, Harley 4:44

MUSICIANS

Steve Harley - Vocals, Guitar
Robbie Gladwell - Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar, Backing Vocals
Barry Wickens - Acoustic Guitar, Violin, Backing Vocals
Jim Cregan - Guitar Solo on "A Friend for Life"
Tony Ryan - Pedal Steel Guitar on "Save Me (From Myself)"
Lincoln Anderson - Bass
James Lascelles - Keyboards
Kerr Nice - Piano on "Journey's End (A Father's Promise)"
Adam Houghton - Drums

BIO

British rocker Steve Harley was born Steven Nice in London on February 27, 1951; the son of a jazz singer, he was stricken with polio at age two and spent the better part of his adolescence in and out of hospitals. After trying his hand at journalism, by the early '70s Harley was busking throughout London, forming the band Cockney Rebel in 1973 with guitarist Jean Paul Crocker, bassist Paul Jeffreys, keyboardist Milton Reame James, and drummer Stuart Elliott. Signing to EMI, the group debuted with The Human Menagerie; the single "Judy Teen" followed in early in 1974, becoming Cockney Rebel's first hit. Psychomodo was also a success, but as Harley's combative relationship with the press worsened he dissolved the group soon after. A Harley solo single, "Big Big Deal, " preceded the formation of a new Cockney Rebel lineup, which again featured drummer Stuart Elliott in addition to new guitarist Jim Cregan, bassist George Ford and keyboardist Duncan McKay. 1975's The Best Years of Our Lives generated Harley's first U.K. chart-topper, "Make Me Smile (Come Up and See Me), " on its way to selling over a million copies; the follow-up Love's a Prima Donna also launched a Top Ten hit with its cover of the Beatles' "Here Comes the Sun." But in the wake of 1977's Face to Face -- A Live Recording, Harley again disbanded Cockney Rebel and relocated to the U.S., recording the better part of Hobo With a Grin in Los Angeles before returning to Britain. 1979's The Candidate failed to restore his commercial lustre, and with the exception of a minor 1983 hit "Ballerina (Prima Donna)" he spent the better part of the '80s removed from the pop scene. When his recording of "Mr. Soft" experienced a rebirth thanks to its use in a television commercial, Harley assembled a hits collection of the same name. Soon after he formed a new incarnation of Cockney Rebel and regularly toured into the following decade. 1999's Stripped to Bare Bones documents an acoustic set recorded the year previous. Yes You Can was issued in summer 2000. © Jason Ankeny, All Music Guide

MORE ABOUT STEVE HARLEY & COCKNEY REBEL (WIKIPEDIA)

Steve Harley (born Stephen Malcolm Ronald Nice, 27 February 1951,Deptford, London, England) is a English singer and songwriter, best known for his work with the 1970s rock group Cockney Rebel, with whom he still occasionally tours (albeit with many personnel changes through the years). As a child, Harley suffered from polio, spending four years in hospital up to the age of 16. It was in hospital that he first heard Bob Dylan, inspiring him to a career of words and music. At the age of 10, he received a guitar from his parents, and he played violin with the school orchestra. He left the Haberdashers' Aske's Hatcham College with no O levels. In 1968, at the age of 17, Harley began work as an accountant with the Daily Express, from which he progressed to become a reporter in a number of local Essex newspapers for a duration of three years. Later, he returned to London to work for the East London Advertiser. Harley first started out playing in bars and clubs in the early 1970s, mainly at folk venues on open-mike nights. He also busked around London on the Underground and in Portobello Road. While auditioning for folk band Odin in 1971, he met violinist John Crocker, with whom he formed Cockney Rebel in late 1972. Cockney Rebel went on to release The Human Menagerie and The Psychomodo before splitting up in 1974. However, Harley carried on with drummer Stuart Elliot, renaming the band Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel, with whom he had more success. From the next album, The Best Years of Our Lives, came the number one and million selling single, "Make Me Smile (Come Up and See Me)". Harley had two more hits during the mid 1970s with "Mr Raffles" and "Here Comes the Sun" which were both Top 20 hits, but he did not have any further major successes, and in the 1980s he all but faded from the public eye, relocating to the United States. He was set to star as the Phantom in the London premiere of The Phantom of the Opera, and recorded the promotional single of the title song, but was surprised to be replaced close to rehearsals by Michael Crawford. In the early 1990s, Harley released several solo albums. His songs "Sebastian", "Tumbling Down", and "Make Me Smile (Come Up and See Me)" were included in the Todd Haynes 1998 rock musical Velvet Goldmine. The soundtrack album included "Make Me Smile", but omitted "Sebastian", yet included a cover version of "Tumbling Down" with vocals by Jonathan Rhys Myers. "Make Me Smile" was also included in the 1997 film, The Full Monty. In 1999, Harley began presenting a BBC Radio programme The Sounds of the Seventies, of which the last programme aired on 27 March 2008. In 2005, The Quality of Mercy was released under the Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel name, and Harley began touring more frequently, although mainstream success remained elusive. Harley lives in Suffolk with his wife, Dorothy. They have two children, Kerr and Greta

24.4.10

Brand X


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Brand X - Timeline - 1999 - Buckyball Music

Superb Jazz Rock/Fusion (not getting into definitions again!) with some excellent long stretched superbly played pieces, with great guitar solos and spacy sounds. Robin Lumley, the keyboardist with Brand X made the following comment about Brand X's music style, - "We never objected to being called a jazz-Rock band, but really we were playing rock 'n' roll with jazz bits in it." Brand X "Timeline" consists of a double CD featuring the band in live concerts at two different periods: 1977 and 1993. On Disc 1 Brand X played as a quintet, live in Chicago on November 16th, 1977. On Disc 2 the band played as a trio, live in New York, on June 21st, 1993. Both concerts showcase the dynamic, innovative and creative energy of this great jazz rock/fusion band. The playing smokes throughout both concerts, even though they are divided by 16 years. Drummer Kenwood Dennard is phenomenal on the 77 concert, and Phil Collins great drum work is hardly missed; the drumming being executed by Kenwood Dennard, and Frank Katz. On the second concert disc, John Goodsall does a great job filling in with good Synth-Guitar which dilutes the sometimes overpowering Electric Guitar often associated with power trios. The balance is just right here. Percy Jones Bass playing is clever, subtle, and nicely counterbalances John Goodsall's incredible guitar work. Both concerts feature many subtle passages, beautifully played, and the jamming work is intense and exciting. There is some tape wow and hiss on the album, but in general, sound quality is adequate and the tight musicianship comes across ok, sonically. "Timeline" is HR by A.O.O.F.C. If you are not familiar with the band, then try and listen to the "Masques" album. There is info on BX's "Manifest Destiny" album @ BRX/MANDES For music in the same genre, check out albums by Bill Bruford, Tribal Tech, and National Health

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

DISC 1

1. Disco Suicide - Robin Lumley
2. Nightmare Patrol - Kenwood Dennard, John Goodsall
3. Why Should I Lend You Mine (When You've Broken Yours Already) - John Goodsall, Percy Jones, Robin Lumley, Phil Collins
4. Access to Data - John Goodsall
5. Nuclear Burn - Phil Collins, John Goodsall, Percy Jones
6. Euthanasia Waltz - John Goodsall
7. Malaga Virgen - Percy Jones
8. Deadly Nightshade - Morris Pert
9 Why Should I Lend You Mine 2 * - John Goodsall, Percy Jones, Robin Lumley, Phil Collins

* Bonus track on some Japanese CD issues

DISC 2

1. Introduction - John Goodsall
2. Duck Exploding, A - John Goodsall, Percy Jones, Frank Katz
3. Guitar Concerto - Arr. by John Goodsall
4. Thalidomide Squid - John Goodsall
5. Strangeness - Percy Jones
6. Nuclear Burn/Cambodia - John Goodsall, Percy Jones, Robin Lumley
7. Drum Solo - Frank Katz
8. Church of Hype - Percy Jones
9. Healing Dream - John Goodsall
10. Macrocosm - John Goodsall

MUSICIANS DISC 1

John Goodsall - guitar
Percy Jones - bass
Robin Lumley - Keyboards
Morris Pert - percussions
Kenwood Dennard - drums

MUSICIANS DISC 2

John Goodsall - guitar
Percy Jones - bass
Frank Katz - drums

SHORT BIO

Brand X were a British jazz-rock fusion outfit formed by Genesis drummer Phil Collins and Atomic Rooster guitarist John Goodsall as a side project from their regular groups. Their initial lineup also included keyboardist Robin Lumley and bassist Percy Jones (the Liverpool Scene, the Scaffold). Brand X's debut album, Unorthodox Behaviour, was released in 1976; a live album, Livestock, and the studio effort Moroccan Roll followed in 1977. Collins left the group to concentrate on Genesis, and for 1978's Masques, he was replaced by Al Di Meola drummer Chuck Burgi, as well as additional keyboardist Peter Robinson, who had played with Stanley Clarke. Three further albums — 1979's Product, 1980's Do They Hurt?, and 1982's Is There Anything About? — followed before the group disbanded. In the mid-'90s, Lumley, Goodsall, and Jones reunited, issuing several live collections in the years to follow. © Steve Huey, allmusic.com, www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:gifyxqw5ldde

BIO (WIKI)

Brand X is a classic jazz fusion band, noted for including Phil Collins in its ranks. Its original incarnation was active between 1974–1980. Other important members were John Goodsall (guitar), Percy Jones (bass), Robin Lumley (keyboards) and Morris Pert (percussion). In the 1990s, original members John Goodsall and Percy Jones formed a new version of Brand X. In 1999, Goodsall reformed Brand X with fretless bassist Mick Stevens replacing Percy Jones. This version of the band includes keyboardist Kris Sjobring who performed with the touring version of Brand X in 1997. Contrary to popular belief, Brand X was in existence long before Collins became involved. It started in 1974 as a "blowing" band which got together weekly at PSL, a rehearsal facility in the London suburb of Wandsworth. Keyboard player Robin Lumley (a one-time member of David Bowie's Spiders From Mars) and bassist Percy Jones (ex-The Liverpool Scene) had used the same studio with their previous band Karass (led by sax player Jack Lancaster) and one night were, explains Lumley, "asked along for a blow, as there was a vague possibility of getting a deal with Island. We trolled along to have a play, only to discover that the lead guitarist was something very special: John Goodsall, recently just out of Atomic Rooster" (Goodsall was known as "Johnny Mandala" during his stint with AR). When they started rehearsing at Island Studios, the label's A&R man (and ex-Melody Maker critic) Richard Williams took note of their music and wrote down "Brand X" in the studio diary, since the group lacked a name at the time. Original singer/percussionist Phil Spinelli and rhythm guitarist Pete Bonas quit the band after inconclusive sessions for an Average White Band-style album. The rest of the band decided to carry on as an instrumental, jazz-fusion style unit. Original drummer John Dillon left at that point, and Genesis drummer Phil Collins, who engaged in prolific session work during this period, agreed to take over in early 1975, feeling he could fit in time for recording and gigs with Brand X as a side project. In September 1975, Unorthodox Behaviour was recorded but was turned down by Island and eventually released on Genesis's label Charisma in early 1976. Regular gigging followed throughout 1976, working around Collins' commitments with Genesis. Percussionist and composer Morris Pert was added shortly before the late 1976 sessions for the follow-up Moroccan Roll. (The band had previously employed other percussionists, including Bill Bruford, Jeff Seopardie, Andy Ward (of Camel) and Preston Heyman). By early 1977, it became clear that Collins would be unavailable for much of the year, and Brand X decided to recruit a replacement drummer (although Collins rejoined for strategic dates throughout the year). Their first choice, Joe Blocker, didn't work out (he joined Steve Hillage's band instead), and eventually American drummer Kenwood Dennard filled the slot, making his debut on the band's first US tour (a 32-date affair in May-June 1977) and appearing on part of the live album Livestock. Collins came back to the fold for a series of dates in September 1977 including two appearances on the same day in London (Crystal Palace garden party) and Paris (Fete de l’Humanite) - the first time ever a band played two open-air shows in different countries on the same day ! A second US tour followed late in the year, again with Dennard on drums. Meanwhile, Lumley was becoming more and more in-demand as a producer, which led to the recruitment of ex-Quatermass and Stanley Clarke keyboardist Peter Robinson. 1978's Masques (produced by Lumley) also introduced a new drummer, Chuck Burgi. For much of the band's touring that year, Californian guitarist Mike Miller depped for Goodsall, and the "exploding drummer" syndrome continued leading to the recruitment of ex-Headhunters drummer Mike Clark. In 1979, Collins was temporarily free of commitments with Genesis, and re-joined Brand X for the series of recording sessions which would produce two albums, 1979's Product and 1980's Do They Hurt?. These took place at Startling Studios, located in Ringo Starr's countryside home (formerly owned by John Lennon), with two distinct line-ups operating in alternation, as Jones later explained. "Our record and management companies were both complaining about poor record sales and telling us we had to make the music more accessible. Some of the guys agreed to go along with this but I felt that to do this would not generate a new audience but would probably just alienate the one that we already had. The only solution was to have two bands, one being more accessible and the other being more experimental or whatever. For my stuff the line-up was Robinson, Clark, Goodsall and me; for the other direction it was Lumley, Collins and Goodsall with John Giblin on bass. We recorded in shifts, ours was 8pm to 4am and the others 10am to 6pm. How Goodsall managed to do both is still a mystery to me !". Touring resumed in September 1979 for a North American tour which brought back together the original line-up of Collins, Goodsall, Jones and Lumley, albeit with Peter Robinson still on second keyboards. The dual keyboard formula had been established earlier in the year when Lumley and Robinson (along with fellow Brand X members Goodsall and Pert) both took part in the tour for Rod Argent's "Movin' Home" album. "Being a keyboard-player's album, it had tons of keys overdubs", Lumley recalled, "which meant more than one keyboard player if the tunes were to be performed live. So Pete and I formed a huge "castle" of keyboards at one side of the stage and played all the bits Rod couldn't do!... The twin keyboards arrangement worked so well, that we carried on with the idea for the 1979-80 Brand X tours". A final UK tour took place in April-May 1980 (co-headlining with Bruford), for which Mike Clark once again took over the drum stool. The band disintegrated at that point, with both Jones and Goodsall moving to America (Lumley eventually settled in Australia). In 1982, a final studio album, Is There Anything About?, was released, consisting of re-worked outtakes from previous sessions. (For instance "Modern, Noisy, and Effective" is simply the backing track to "Soho" with a new keyboard line). "I don't think anyone wanted to do this album", Lumley later recounted. "But there was a contractual thing with CBS which had to be fulfilled. It ended up my baby, but not by choice... I was simply the only person in the UK at the time to do it !!! Tony Smith, our manager, asked me to undertake it, by trawling through reels of old takes to see if I could come up with something. Steve Short (Trident engineer) and I overdubbed and fiddled with the takes we thought viable... I know that the chaps who weren't around weren't happy... But then neither was I !!! However one undertakes a salvage job like that, you'll never please everyone. Certainly the whole thing was a disappointment and perhaps should never have been attempted... Although the contractual business was unavoidable". Looking back on his Brand X years, Lumley says: “It was great that everyone really got on well, from beginning to end. Funnily enough there was never really a leader. People recognised Phil as a figure head and he had his own status, but generally it was a band without a boss. We were all very good friends socially, and we all shared the same sense of humour. Yes, there were some very silly episodes with Super Glue on the road! I refuse to take all the blame for that. But I did manage to get some industrial strength glue that was used for sticking aeroplanes together. So as far as sticking hotel room furniture to the ceiling was concerned - that was easy! Lumley addressed the reasons for the breakup as follows: - "The fact is we wore it out. We certainly didn't hate each other. We could no longer write anything together that made us happy and we just got on with other things. Phil of course went into his solo career, which became fantastically successful. The interesting thing is that now the old Brand X records are selling really well. I guess they are appealing to people who have worn out their vinyl copies and want the CDs! We never objected to being called a jazz-Rock band, but really we were playing rock 'n' roll with jazz bits in it." Goodsall and Jones got back together in 1992 with drummer Frank Katz under the Brand X name again for the Xcommunication album. This version of the band featured Goodsall performing on guitar and MIDI-guitar. The 1996 album Manifest Destiny also includes Goodsall, Jones, and Katz, as well as Franz Pusch on keyboards and other instruments, Marc Wagnon on MIDI vibes and other percussion instruments, Ronnie Ciago on percussion, and Danny Wilding on flute. European and Japanese tours took place in 1997 with a revised line-up consisting of Goodsall, Jones, former Gong drummer Pierre Moerlen and keyboardist Kris Sjobring. Jones subsequently departed, leaving Goodsall to front a California-based version of the band with Sjobring, fretless bassist Mick Stevens and drummer John Holmes and Brand X touring keyboardist Kris Sjobring. The unreleased CD "X2K/live at the House of Blues" was recorded during their "X2K" U.S. West Coast tour. In 2004, veteran drummer Brock Avery joined the line-up who announced plans for their first new studio CD in almost 10 years, which was due to appear in 2007.

Pages


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Pages - Pages (1st album) - 1978 - Epic

Confusingly, Pages released their third album in 1981 on Capitol called...Guess what?...Yes. Pages! However this album is now becoming known as "Pages 3". The post here, the bands debut s/t album was released in 1978. They are two completely different albums. Richard Page and Steve George had been working together for years in and around Southern California and had done sessions, backing vocals, and penned songs, for artists like Kenny Loggins, Patti LaBelle, Rick Springfield, The Pointer Sisters, Donna Summer etc. Pages' biggest success came with the band Mr. Mister. (As lead vocalist for Mr. Mister, Page scored two consecutive Hot 100 #1's with the singles "Broken Wings" and "Kyrie"). Richard Page and Steve George made three albums for Epic and Capitol Records under the name Pages, and their first album is very professional late 70's West Coast pop-rock. The vocals are good, and the songs are well above average compared to a lot of music in this genre. There are plenty of good melodic hooks, and the whole album has a nice soul jazz touch. Pages' music has been described as "Steely Dan meets Toto". Musicians on the album include Victor Feldman, Michael Brecker, Lani Groves, and Philip Bailey. Check out the band's 1981 "Pages" (aka "Pages 3"), and "Future Street" albums. Check out Richard Page's bio @ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Page_(musician) and Steve George's bio @ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_George_(keyboardist)

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

Clearly Kim - (R.Page,S.George,J.Lang)
This Is For The Girls - (R.Page,J.Lang)
Let It Go - (R.Page,S.George,J.Lang)
Listen For The Love - (J.Manfredi,R.Page,S.George,J.Lang)
Love Dance - (J.Manfredi)
If I Saw You Again - (J.Manfredi,R.Page,S.George,J.Lang)
Interlude - (D.Grusin)
It's Alright - (J.Manfredi,R.Page,S.George,J.Lang)
Room At The Top - (J.Manfredi,R.Page,S.George,J.Lang)
I Get It From You - (R.Page,S.George,J.Lang)

MUSICIANS

Richard Page - Guitar Solo, Lead & Background Vocals, Clavinet, Grand Piano
Steve George - Grand Piano, Fender Rhodes,Yamaha CS80 Synthesizer, Oberheim Synthesizer, Mini-Moog, Mini-Moog[solo], Lead Vocal and Background Vocals
Peter Leinheiser - Electric & Acoustic Guitars, Guitars[solo]
Jerry Manfredi - Bass, Bass[solo]
Russ Battelene - Drums, Vocals
Chuck Silverman, Claudio Slon - Percussion
Tim Downs - Percussion
Steve Forman - Percussion,Timbali
Bobby Colomby - Background Vocals, Percussion
Francisco Aquabella - Congas
Victor Feldman - Vibes
Michael Brecker - Tenor Sax Solo
Horn Arranged by Randy Brecker
Strings Arranged and Conducted by Dave Grusin
Lani Groves - Vocals, Background Vocals
Philip Bailey, Donna Fien,Mary Hylan and Linda Mallah - Background Vocals

Pages


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Pages - Future Street - 1979 - Epic

Steve George and Richard Page worked together for years around Southern California and had done sessions, and penned songs, for Kenny Loggins, Patti LaBelle, Rick Springfield, and The Pointer Sisters. Their biggest commercial success came with Mr. Mister (Remember "Kyrie", "Broken Wings"?). Richard and Steve made three albums for Epic and Capitol Records under the name Pages. This is their 2nd album, and is expertly executed late '70s West Coast pop-rock. The vocals and lyrics are good. The songs are more intricate than many W.Coast compositions from this period. The album also has great rhythm sections and horn arrangements. Some of the guitar solos are Grade A. A good album, and reminiscent of a "Steely Dan meets Toto sound". (Read that somewhere!). "Future Street" has been called "a west coast classic album", but although it's a very good album, it is not a " west coast classic". "Chemistry" is a great track, in the jazz/prog.rock mould, and a few more tracks like would have made this a better album. Pages third album, the 1981 s/t one, IS a "a west coast classic album", full of great original, funky pop jazz/fusion tracks, and is well worth hearing.

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1. I do believe in you - R. Page / S. George / J. Lang / J. Manfredi
2. The sailor's song - R. Page / S. George / J. Lang / J. Manfredi
3. Take my heart away - R. Page / J. Lang
4. Future Street - R. Page / S. George / J. Lang / J. Manfredi
5. Who's right, who's wrong - R. Page / Kenny Loggins
6. Chemistry - R. Page / S. George / J. Lang / J. Manfredi
7. Two people - R. Page / S. George / J. Lang
8. Keep on movin' - Page / George / Lang / Manfredi / Johnson

MUSICIANS

Lead Vocals, Keyboards, Synthesizer, Backing Vocals - Richard Page
Guitar - Tim May
Guitar [Rhythm] - Joey Trujillo on "The Sailors Song", and "Chemistry" : Acoustic Guitar on "Take My Heart Away"
Bass [Fretless Bass] - Jerry Manfredi
Acoustic Guitar, Guitar [Electric] - Charles "Icarus" Johnson
Keyboards, Synthesizer, Vocals: Lead Vocals on "Two People" - Steve George
Keyboards, Electric Piano [Fender Rhodes] - Jai Winding on "Who's Right, Who's Wrong"
Drums - George Lawrence : Russell Battelene on "The Sailors Song", & "Take My Heart Away"
Saxophone [Tenor Solo] - Michael Brecker on "Who's Right, Who's Wrong"
Horns - Bill Reichenbach, Chuck Findley, Jerry Hey, Larry Williams, Lew McCreary
Vocals - George Hawkins : Kenny Loggins on "Who's Right, Who's Wrong"

21.4.10

Robert Wyatt


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Robert Wyatt - Shleep - 1997 - Hannibal Records

Robert Wyatt continues to follow his singular musical path with the lovely Shleep, delivering another album of considerable quirky charm and understated beauty; a less melancholy affair than much of his recent work, the record is informed by a hazy, dreamlike quality perfectly in keeping with the elements of subconsciousness implicit in the title. © Jason Ankeny © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:wzfexqqjldte~T1

Representing another career high, 1997's Shleep stands as one of Robert Wyatt's most elaborate yet accessible albums, featuring a stellar cast of players (Brian Eno, Phil Manzanera, Paul Weller, Evan Parker and Annie Whitehead among others) and some truly beautiful arrangements, dampening down some of the quirks that tend to characterise Wyatt albums. This is probably attributable to the extremely collaborative nature of Shleep, meaning that initial spark of weirdness and off-kilter creativity diminishes somewhat as it passes through the hands of Wyatt's accompanists. The heightened sense of organization and structure has its benefits though, lending a real sense of warmth and consistency to the album's flow. Even the stranger moments - such as 'The Duchess', with its wailing, articulate soloing from Parker, and Wyatt's mumbled surreal lyrics - seem to be framed within the realms of comparative normality, with a swinging rhythm section and sturdily repetitious piano chord sequence. Recommended. © http://www.boomkat.com/item.cfm?id=144101

"How anyone can have been around as long as Robert Wyatt and end up putting out an album this good - easily the best of the best records he has ever made is completely beyond me. There could be no smoother blend of folk, pop, mingus style jazz meandering, and even at times almost a musique concrete feel. My hero!" - a brilliantly descriptive comment on this album sent to http://www.amazon.com/Shleep-Robert-Wyatt/dp/B0000057OK by "A Customer".

Really original and upbeat progressive rock in the Canterbury style from the great drummer of Soft Machine, Robert Wyatt. There is a wonderful percussive base to the music. The very English Robert Wyatt's typical quirky lyrics and eccentric rhymes abound. Musicians include Brian Eno, Paul Weller, and Annie Whitehead. Listen to Robert Wyatt's great "Rock Bottom" album, and Soft Machine's "Fourth" album. For music in a similar vein, it is worth checking out band's like Hatfield And The North, Caravan, Gong, Matching Mole, and other bands from the giant "Canterbury Scene" family tree of British progressive rock artists

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1 Heaps of Sheeps (Benge/Wyatt/arr. Eno) (4:56)
2 The Duchess (Wyatt) (4:18)
3 Maryan (Wyatt/Catherine) (6:11)
4 Was a Friend (Wyatt/Hopper) (6:09) [Track 4 - Intro: sample from 'The Music of Robert Wyatt' by the Austrian group, The More Extended Versions]
5 Free Will and Testament (Wyatt/Kramer) (4:13)
6 September the Ninth (Benge/Wyatt) (6:41)
7 Alien (Benge/Wyatt) (6:47)
8 Out Of Season (Benge/Wyatt) (2:32)
9 A Sunday in Madrid (Benge/Wyatt) (4:41)
10 Blues in Bob Minor (Wyatt) (5:46)
11 The Whole Point of No Return (Wyatt) (1:25)

N.B: Tracks 6, & 10 may be repeated twice on this post. Please ignore the 2nd versions @ 192 Kbps
MUSICIANS

Robert Wyatt: Percussion, Trumpet, Guitar (Bass), Keyboards, Vocals, Voices, Choir, Chorus, Polish Fiddle
Brian Eno: Synthesizer, Vocals, Synthesizer Bass
Philip Catherine, Phil Manzanera: Guitar
Jamie Johnson: Guitar, Choir, Chorus
Paul Weller: Guitar, Harmony Vocals
Chucho Merchan: Percussion, Drums (Bass), Guitar (Bass), Double Bass
Evan Parker: Saxophone, Sax (Soprano), Sax (Tenor)
Annie Whitehead: Trombone
Chikako Sato: Violin
Gary Azukx: Djembe
Alfreda Benge: Vocals, Voices, Choir, Chorus
Charles Rees: Choir, Chorus

BIO

An enduring figure who came to prominence in the early days of the English art rock scene, Robert Wyatt has produced a significant body of work, both as the original drummer for art rockers Soft Machine and as a radical political singer/songwriter. Born in Bristol, England, Wyatt came to Soft Machine during the exciting, slightly post-psychedelic Canterbury Scene of the mid-'60s that produced bands like Gong and Pink Floyd. Unlike many of the art rock bands that would come later (Jethro Tull, Yes, King Crimson), Soft Machine eschewed bloated theatrical excess, preferring a standard rock format that interpolated jazz riffing, extended soloing, and some forays into experimental noise. Wyatt, then Soft Machine's drummer, left the band during its initial wave of popularity. His solo career was built less around his abilities as a percussionist and more around his frail tenor voice, capable of breaking hearts with its falsetto range. It was not long after his first solo release, End of an Ear, that Wyatt fell from an open window during a party, fracturing his back and permanently paralyzing him from the waist down. After months of painful recuperation, Wyatt reemerged with the harrowing Rock Bottom (1974) and the bizarre Ruth Is Stranger Than Richard (1975), the former dealing explicitly with his post-accident life, the latter a series of surreal fables. And while the music on these records is trance-like and experimental, Wyatt shockingly recorded a straight version of the Monkees' "I'm a Believer" in 1974 that became a big British hit. Controversy ensued when the BBC's long-running weekly pop music program Top of the Pops refused to allow Wyatt to perform the song in his wheelchair. After a significant protest played out in the music trade papers, Wyatt did perform. Despite his success, Wyatt remained quiet for much of the rest of the decade, breaking his silence during the punk era with a handful of singles recorded for the great English indie label Rough Trade. Again, going against audience expectations, he recorded a beautiful version of Chic's "At Last I Am Free." This signaled the start of a full-fledged career renaissance that included numerous albums and artists such as Elvis Costello writing songs for him. His albums were lush, at times almost meditative, and Wyatt's voice — clear, emotionally charged, and always on the verge of breaking — brought great depth and soul to songs that, if recorded by a lesser artist, would have sounded terse and tired. Always on the political left, Wyatt's radicalism increased exponentially during Margaret Thatcher's years as Prime Minister, as he maintained an unwavering support for Communism even as glasnost was nigh. The resulting music he recorded during this period reflects his strong, bordering on strident, political beliefs. As of the mid-2000s, Wyatt has comfortably worked in and out of the music business. He records when he feels like it, paints, writes, devotes time to political work, and continues to show no interest in the machinations of the music industry. But, despite his occasionally strident political posture, he has recorded some stunning music, full of wonder, possibility, and pure emotion, that remains undiscovered by many. © John Dougan © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:3ifixqr5ldfe~T1

20.4.10

Climax Blues Band


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Climax Blues Band - Drastic Steps - 1988 - Clay

The album includes a new version and a bonus remixed version of "Couldn't Get It Right". "California Sunshine", and "The Deceiver" are good tracks, and the album includes an old reworked CBB favourite, "Fool For The Bright Lights". Great guitar work from Les Hunt, but the album is more typical of a commercial late 80's West Coast sound. If you are not too familiar with this great band's history, you may enjoy this album, but if you are looking for the more authentic "John Mayall" CBB sound, then listen to the band's great "Rich Man" album. Check out the band's "FM Live" album @ CBB/FMLIVE for the "real" CBB sound. N.B: This album has been released with different track sequences. Some 1988 vinyl releases did not include the track "Couldn't Get It Right (extended '88 mix)". The album has also been released as "Drastic Steps Plus". The album posted here is the 1988 UK Clay label CD issue, which includes the "Couldn't Get It Right (extended '88 mix)" track. It has been said that this album was recorded as a three piece band with session musicians. Wikipedia states that Lester Hunt played on this album, and not Pete Haycock. Can anybody pinpoint the drummer on this release? Did Derek Holt and John Edwards both play bass on the album? Who are the session musicians? All info appreciated

TRACKS / COMPOSERS

1 California Sunshine - Cooper, Glover
2 Lonely Avenue - Cooper, Glover
3 The Deceiver - Cooper, Glover
4 Ordinary People - Cooper, Glover
5 The Winner - Cooper, Glover
6 Couldn't Get It Right - Cooper, Cuffley, Haycock, Holt, Jones
7 Fool for the Bright Lights - Cooper, Glover
8 Good Times - Cooper, Glover
9 Trouble - Cooper, Glover
10 Couldn't Get It Right (extended '88 mix) - Cooper, Cuffley, Haycock, Holt, Jones

BAND [Not definitive]

Pete Haycock - Guitar, Vocals [N.B: Wikipedia states that Pete Haycock was not on this album]
Lester Hunt - Guitar, Lead Vocals, Backing Vocals
John Edwards - Bass, Vocals
Derek Holt - Bass
Peter Filleul - Keyboards, Vocals
Colin Cooper - Sax

It has been said that this album was recorded as a three piece band with session musicians. Wikipedia states that Lester Hunt played on this album, and not Pete Haycock. Can anybody pinpoint the drummer on this release? Did Derek Holt and John Edwards both play bass on the album? Who are the session musicians? All info appreciated

SHORT BIO

Led by Colin Cooper, the former frontman of the R&B unit The Hipster Image, the Stafford, England-based Climax Chicago Blues Band was one of the leading lights of the late-1960s blues boom. A sextet also comprised of guitarists Derek Holt and Peter Haycock, keyboardist Arthur Wood, bassist Richard Jones and drummer George Newsome, the group debuted in 1969 with a self-titled effort recalling the work of John Mayall. Prior to the release of 1969's Plays On, Jones left the group, prompting Holt to move to bass. In 1970 the Climax Chicago Blues Band moved to the Harvest label, at the same time shifting towards a more rock-oriented sound on the LP A Lot Of Bottle. Around the release of 1971's Tightly Knit, Newsome was replaced by drummer John Holt; upon Wood's exit in the wake of 1972's Rich Man, the unit decided to continue on as a quartet, also dropping the "Chicago" portion of their name to avoid confusion with the American band of the same name. In 1974 The Climax Blues Band issued Fm Live, a document of a New York radio concert. 1975's Stamp was their commercial breakthrough, and 1976's Gold Plated fared even better, spurred on by the success of the hit "Couldn't Get It Right." However, the rise of punk effectively stopped the group in their tracks, although they continued recording prolifically well into the 1980s; after 1988's Drastic Steps, The Climax Blues Band was silent for a number of years, but resurfaced in 1994 with Blues From The Attic. © Jason Ankeny, All Music Guide

19.4.10

Crack The Sky


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Crack The Sky - Live Sky - 1978 - Lifesong Records

This album is a must-have for any fan of aggressive, prog rock, if only for the guitar solo of the William Tell Overture that finishes "Surf City." Crack the Sky were famous as a live outfit, and on Live Sky, they pulled out all the stops. Though the band had the chops and precision to do note-perfect replications of the cuts on their albums, the versions here are extended and include all sorts of musical excursions. Extending "Ice" past 12 minutes may have been a bit of a stretch, but on the whole the album is a success. Several different cuts from Live Sky managed airplay in various parts of the U.S., and broadened the band's audience while encouraging the faithful. © Richard Foss © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:difuxqe5ldse

Even without John Palumbo, "Live Sky" demonstrated Crack The Sky's dynamic prog. rock sound. There is a twelve minute version of "Ice" with outstanding vocals by Gary Chappell and superb keyboard work from Vince DePaul. "I Am the Walrus" is a great cover of the Beatles' classic song, and proved the intelligent and clever musicianship of the band. Crack The Sky could have been a huge band, but in the music business you're only as good as your last album. Although the band have reformed at various intervals since 1975, arguably, they never bettered their classic mid seventies s/t release which received Rolling Stone magazine's 'album of the year' award, or their 1976 "Animal Notes" album.

TRACKS

1."Hold On" – 2:48
2."Maybe I Can Fool Everybody (Tonight)" – 6:30
3."Lighten Up McGraw" – 5:06 - Rob Stevens, Rick Witkowski, Joe Macre
4."She's a Dancer" – 9:08
5."Ice" – 12:18
6."Surf City" – 7:42
7."I Am the Walrus" – 5:36 - John Lennon, Paul McCartney

All songs composed by John Palumbo, except where stated

N.B: In 1988, four of the tracks on this album ("Maybe I Can Fool Everybody (Tonight)", "Lighten Up McGraw", "She's a Dancer", and "I Am the Walrus") were included on the CD release of "Live on WBAB". In 2006, six of the tracks, remixed and remastered were included on "Alive and Kickin' Ass", a CD compiled from the same 1978 shows as Live Sky. "She's a Dancer" on Live Sky is an edited version; The full original track is on the "Alive and Kickin' Ass" album. The album posted here was recorded at Tower Theatre-Philadelphia, PA w/ Record Plant Truck And Agora Theatre-Cleveland, OH.

BAND

Rick Witkowski - Lead Guitar
Jim Griffiths - Lead Guitar, Vocals
Joe Macre - Bass Guitar, Vocals
Vince DePaul - Keyboards
Joey D'Amico - Drums, Vocals
Gary Lee Chappell - Lead Vocals

SHORT BIO

Progressive rock group Crack the Sky was formed in the Ohio River Valley region (Steubenville, OH) in 1975 by frontman John Palumbo, guitarists Jim Griffiths and Rick Witkowski, bassist Joe Macre, and drummer Joey D'Amico. According to the website at www.crackthesky.com, the band was originally dubbed ArcAngel, building a loyal following on the Cleveland and Baltimore club circuits before signing to the Lifesong label to issue their self-titled debut LP, which earned critical acclaim for Palumbo's acerbic lyrics and the songs' complex structures and time changes. Commercial reward was minimal, however, and after completing Crack the Sky's second LP, 1976's Animal Notes, Palumbo exited to pursue a solo career. D'Amico assumed lead vocal duties on 1978's Safety in Numbers, with singer Gary Lee Chappell featured on the Live Sky release. Crack the Sky then disbanded, but in 1980 Palumbo, Witkowski, and keyboardist Vince DePaul briefly reformed the group to record the White Music album before again dissolving. Palumbo then formed another new lineup for a series of albums including Photoflamingo, World in Motion I, and Raw before reuniting with Witkowski, D'Amico, and DePaul for a series of 1986 live dates at the Baltimore club Hammerjacks and eventually a new 1989 studio LP, From the Greenhouse. Dog City followed in 1990, and Crack the Sky infrequently reunited throughout the decade to come. © Jason Ankeny © 2010 Rovi Corporation. All Rights Reserved http://allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:0ifuxqw5ldte~T1